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Celebrating our 20th Birthday!

Professional Development Resources has now been providing accredited continuing education courses to psychologists, social workers, counselors, speech-language pathologists, registered dietitians and occupational therapists is celebrating it's 20th birthdayWe have now been providing accredited continuing education courses to psychologists, social workers, counselors, speech-language pathologists, registered dietitians and occupational therapists for 20 continuous years! Our company, which started as one person presenting a single live seminar to small groups in selected Florida cities, is now an established entity in the world of continuing education featuring over 170 CE courses that are available online 24/7 anywhere in the world.

We have earned formal recognition as a provider of continuing education by major professional boards, including the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). In addition, we are recognized by professional boards in Florida, California, Ohio, Illinois, South Carolina, and Texas.

“It is really hard to believe we have been doing this for 20 years,” says Leo Christie, PhD, licensed marriage and family therapist and president of Professional Development Resources. “It is gratifying to look around us today and see where we are now, as compared with the early years. We are squarely in the digital world, with all of our continuing education courses available via the Internet and nearly all of our procedures completely paperless. As opposed to offering live seminars to small select audiences as we did when we started, we can now make our CE curriculum available to professionals anywhere in the world.”

It has not always been easy according to Christie. There were hard times, as one would expect in any business that has persisted for 20 years. “There were times I was not at all sure we were going to make it. When we transitioned from presenting live seminars to offering home study courses, it was a major transformation that required re-purposing our entire curriculum. Presenting material in written format is fundamentally different from doing so in live settings. Suddenly we had an urgent need for more topics and more courses. We had gotten along well with five or six topics in live seminars, but that was far too few to offer for self-study. Our most pressing and challenging task was curriculum development.”

Today, we have over 170 online continuing education courses covering a very wide variety of clinical topics such as domestic violence, professional ethics and boundaries, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), autism, Alzheimer’s, alternative therapies, mindfulness, multicultural issues, substance abuse and addiction, gender identity, preventing medical errors, ADHD, psychopharmacology, brain injury, eliminating self-defeating behaviors, overeating and obesity, treating chronic pain, and anxiety management. There are even a few unexpected and non-traditional courses, like Animal Assisted Therapy and Electronic Media and Youth Violence (Cyber-Bullying).

As a 20th birthday present to ourselves and all of our loyal customers, we are poised to launch a  new and revolutionary website platform, which will feature a wide array of user engagement tools we hope will propel us into the next 20 years.

About Professional Development Resources, Inc.

Professional Development Resources is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation founded in 1992 by licensed marriage and family therapist Leo Christie, PhD. The company, which is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) – as well as many other national and state boards – has focused its efforts on making continuing education courses more cost-effective and widely accessible to health professionals by offering online home study coursework. Its current expanded curriculum includes a wide variety of clinical topics intended to equip health professionals to offer state-of-the art services to their clients.

 

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Kids Exposed to Bullying, Violence May Age Faster

By 

The emotional and physical scars from being bullied or exposed to other types of violence as a child may go deeper than imagined.

New research shows that the genetic material, or DNA, of children who experienced violence shows the type of wear and tear that is normally associated with advancing age.

“Children who experience extreme violence at a young age have a biological age that is much older than other children,” says researcher Idan Shalev. He is a post-doctoral researcher in psychology and neuroscience at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy in Durham, N.C.

Youth violence is widespread in the U.S. today. The CDC states that it’s the second leading cause of death among people between the ages of 10 and 24, and that nationwide, about 20% of students in grades 9-12 were bullied in 2009.

Bullied Kids Age Faster Than Others

To see whether youth violence affects vulnerability to aging, the study authors focused on telomeres, or tiny strips of genetic material that look like tails on the ends of our chromosomes; think of a cap on an end of a shoelace. Telomere shortening is an indicator of cell aging.

The researchers analyzed DNA samples from twins at ages 5 and 10 and compared telomere length to three kinds of violence: domestic violence between the mother and her partner, being bullied frequently, and physical maltreatment by an adult. Moms were also interviewed when kids were 5, 7, and 10 to create a cumulative record of exposure to violence.

Children who were exposed to cumulative violence showed accelerated telomere shortening from age 5 to age 10. What’s more, children who were exposed to multiple forms of violence had the fastest telomere shortening rate, the study shows.

“Children who experience violence appear to be aging at a faster rate,” Shalev says.

Whether or not these changes are reversible is not clear. Shalev and colleagues plan to study the children for longer periods of time to see what happens later on in life. Their findings appear in Molecular Psychiatry.

Bullying Scars Run Deep

Bullying and other violence experienced during childhood may cause a physical erosion of DNA, says Paul Thompson, PhD. He is a professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

“We now have a physical record that violence during childhood could be damaging later in life,” he says. This is a “big surprise.”

Victor Fornari, MD, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y., says the new findings make perfect sense. “This article really points to a potential biological [indicator] that helps explain some of the differences in the brains of children who have experienced significant trauma and stress,” he says.

Read more: http://children.webmd.com/news/20120423/kids-exposed-bullying-violence-may-age-faster

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2012 in General

 

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Florida Psychology License Renewal & Continuing Education

Florida psychologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of May 31, 2012.

Every licensee must complete 40 hours of approved continuing psychological education (CE) within the two year licensure period (biennium) including 2 hours on the prevention of medical errors, 3 hours on ethics and Florida laws, and 2 hours on domestic violence (every third renewal).

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (CE Broker Provider #50-1635 – courses are automatically reported to CE Broker). Florida psychologists may earn all 40 required hours @ pdresources.org.

Questions about CE Broker? Click here for answers to FAQs.

Preventing Medical ErrorsPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. Course #20-10B | 2010 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions
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Ethics and Law in Florida PsychologyEthics & Law in Florida Psychology ensures that Florida-licensed psychologists are fully aware of the ethical and legal privileges and constraints under which they are licensed to practice in the State of Florida. It provides the opportunity for a comprehensive reading of the APA Code of Ethics and the three sets of statutes and rules governing the practice of psychology in Florida. Completing this course will fulfill the requirement that licensed psychologists in Florida complete each biennial renewal period three hours of continuing education on professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Course #30-06 | 2012 | 40 pages | 21 posttest questions
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domestic violenceDomestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence is intended to help health professionals maintain a high state of vigilance and to be well prepared with immediate and appropriate responses when abuse is disclosed. There is a special section on the complexity of an abuse victim’s decision about if and when to leave an abuser. This course will teach clinicians to detect abuse when they see it, screen for the particulars, and respond with definitive assistance in safety planning, community referrals, and individualized treatment plans. Course #20-61 | 2012 | 31 pages | 18 posttest questions
 
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Posted by on February 21, 2012 in General

 

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New Domestic Violence Online Course

 

Domestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner ViolenceDomestic violence, in the form of child abuse and intimate partner violence, remains a pervasive part of contemporary life in the U.S. Its effects are deep and far-reaching. This new 2-hour online continuing education course is intended to help health professionals maintain a high state of vigilance and to be well prepared with immediate and appropriate responses when abuse is disclosed. There is a special section on the complexity of an abuse victim’s decision about if and when to leave an abuser. This course will teach clinicians to detect abuse when they see it, screen for the particulars, and respond with definitive assistance in safety planning, community referrals, and individualized treatment plans.

This course is presented in two sections. Part I will deal with the scope, definitional concepts, dynamics, recognition, assessment, and treatment of victims of child abuse. A section on bullying is included, with consideration of a contemporary variant of bullying known as “cyber-bullying.” There is also a section addressing the question of whether abused children grow up to become abusers themselves. A strengths-based model of assessment and intervention is detailed.

Part II will cover similar aspects of intimate partner violence, including women, children, and men. Sections are included on cross cultural considerations and same gender abuse dynamics. Emphasis is on identifying victims of IPV and providing screening and intervention procedures that are intended to empower victims to take control of their own lives. There are sections on the dynamics that influence when/whether abuse victims decide to leave their abusers and how clinicians can prepare for immediate interventions as soon as a client discloses that he/she is being abused.

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Posted by on February 10, 2012 in General

 

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Study: Child Abuse Bigger Threat than SIDS

By Frederik Joelving

Study: Child abuse bigger threat than SIDSNearly 4,600 U.S. children were hospitalized with broken bones, traumatic brain injury and other serious damage caused by physical abuse in 2006, according to a new report.

Babies younger than one were the most common victims, with 58 cases per 100,000 infants. That makes serious abuse a bigger threat to infant safety than SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, researchers say in the report.

“There is a national campaign to prevent SIDS,” said Dr. John Leventhal of Yale University, who led the new study. “We need a national campaign related to child abuse where every parent is reminded that kids can get injured.”

The new study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, is the first broad U.S. estimate of serious injuries due to child abuse.

Based on data from the 2006 Kids’ Inpatient Database, the last such numbers available, Leventhal’s team found that six out of every 100,000 children under 18 were hospitalized with injuries ranging from burns to wounds to brain injuries and bone fractures.

The children spent an average of one week in the hospital; 300 of them died.

The rate of abuse was highest among children under one, particularly if they were covered by Medicaid, the government’s health insurance for the poor. One out of every 752 of those infants landed in the hospital due to maltreatment.

Read more @ http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/46281207/ns/today-today_health/t/study-child-abuse-bigger-threat-sids/#.TzAWxsWJeq8

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Posted by on February 6, 2012 in General

 

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Child Abuse Price Tag for US is $124 Billion

By MyHealthNewsDaily Staff

http://www.pdresources.org/CourseDetail.aspx?Category=AllCourses&PageNumber=1&Profession=Other&Sort=CourseID&Text=child%20abuse&courseid=1060The child abuse that takes place in one year in the United States will cost the nation $124 billion over the victims’ lifetimes, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The findings reveal the financial burden of child abuse is just as high or higher than that of costly health conditions, including Type 2 diabetes.

“No child should ever be the victim of abuse or neglect — nor do they have to be. The human and financial costs can be prevented through prevention of child maltreatment,” said Linda C. Degutis, director of CDC′s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

In 2008, there were 1,740 confirmed cases of fatal child abuse, and 579,000 nonfatal cases of child maltreatment, which include physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological abuse and neglect, according to the report.

The cost of health care, child welfare and other services for each victim who survived their abuse will be $210,012 over the average victim’s lifetime, which is higher than the lifetime cost of stroke ($159,846 per person) and Type 2 diabetes (between $181,000 and $253,000 per person). The costs of each death due to abuse are even higher, according to the report.

Child maltreatment has been shown to have many negative effects on survivors, including poorer health, social and emotional difficulties, and decreased economic productivity. These negative effects over a survivor’s lifetime generate many costs that deleteriously affect the nation’s health care, education, criminal justice and welfare systems. Read more…

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Posted by on February 1, 2012 in General

 

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Renewal Information for Florida Psychologists

Florida Psychologist earning CE credits online

Click to view approved online courses

Florida psychologists have a biennial license renewal deadline of May 31st (of even-numbered years). Every licensee must complete 40 hours of approved continuing psychological education (CE) within the two year licensure period (biennium) including 2 hours on the prevention of medical errors, 3 hours on ethics and Florida laws, and 2 hours on domestic violence (every third renewal).

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Florida psychologists may earn all 40 required hours through coursework @ http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Psychology/AllCourses/CourseID/1/

Continuing Psychological Education Credit

As a condition of biennial licensure renewal, each licensee must complete forty (40) hours of continuing psychological education.

  • Three (3) of the forty (40) hours must be on professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Of those three hours, at least one hour shall be on professional ethics, and at least one hour shall be on Florida laws and rules relevant to the practice of psychology and shall include Chapters 456 and 490, F.S. and Rule Chapter 64B19, F.A.C.
  • Two (2) of the forty (40) hours must relate to prevention of medical errors. In addition to the study of root-cause analysis, error reduction and prevention, and patient safety, the course content shall also be designed to discuss potential errors within a psychological setting, such as inadequate assessment of suicide risk, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, and failure to detect medical conditions presenting as a psychological disorder. If the course is offered by a facility licensed pursuant to Chapter 395, F.S., for its employees, the Board will approve up to one (1) hour of the two (2) hour course to be specifically related to error reduction and prevention methods used in that facility.
  • Every six years, each licensee shall complete two (2) hours of continuing psychological education on domestic violence as defined in Section 741.28, F.S.; these two (2) hours shall be part of the forty (40) hours otherwise required for each biennial licensure renewal. The licensee shall maintain documentation to substantiate timely completion of these two (2) hours and make said documentation available upon request every third biennial licensure renewal period.
  • Passage of the laws and rules examination of the Board constitutes forty (40) hours of continuing education credit, including credit for professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Passage of the laws and rules examination, however, does not satisfy the requirement for the two (2) credit hours of continuing education on domestic violence required every third biennial licensure renewal period, nor the requirement for two (2) hours relating to prevention of medical errors.

Continuing psychological education credit will be granted for:

  • Completion of graduate level courses approved for credit by sponsors approved by the American Psychological Association;
  • Completion of graduate level courses in psychology provided by a university or professional school which is regionally accredited, except that no more than ten (10) hours of continuing psychological education credit may be obtained for each semester hour;
  • Completion of a colloquium, a presentation, a workshop or a symposium offered for continuing education credit by a doctoral psychology program or an internship or residency which is part of a psychology program that is accredited by the American Psychological Association;
  • Full attendance at workshops/seminars offered by providers approved by the American Psychological Association or any of its affiliates, or providers approved by the Board. A list of Board approved providers is available from the Board office upon request;
  • Simple attendance at a state, regional or national psychology convention or conference. Only four (4) credits will be allowed each biennium regardless of how many state, regional or national conventions or conferences are attended during that biennium;
  • Attainment of diplomate status in a specialty area from the American Board of Professional Psychology, for which thirty-seven (37) continuing psychological education credits, not including the two-hour continuing education course on domestic violence required by Section 456.031(1), F.S., and the two-hour continuing education course on the prevention of medical errors required by Section 456.013(7), F.S., will be allowed only during the biennium during which the diplomate is first awarded;
  • Presenting or moderating for the first time only a continuing psychological education program sponsored by a provider approved by the Board, except that credit will be limited to the number of credits allowed by the program;
  • Each hour of attendance at a Board meeting or Board committee meeting. Only one credit will be granted for each hour of full attendance and only ten (10) credits will be allowed each biennium regardless of how many hours are attended during the biennium. Attendance at a Board or committee meeting shall also satisfy, hour by hour, the requirement of professional ethics and legal issues credit set out in subsection (3) of this rule.
  • Continuing education courses approved by any Board within the Division of Medical Quality Assurance of the Department of Health, provided that such courses enhance the psychological skills and/or psychological knowledge of the licensee.
  • The provision of volunteer expert witness opinions for cases being reviewed pursuant to laws and standards relevant to the practice of psychology. Two hours of credit shall be awarded for each case reviewed up to a maximum of ten hours per biennium. In this regard, volunteer expert witnesses are expected to perform a review of the psychological, medical, legal, and/or ethical literature, as appropriate to the case being reviewed.

No continuing psychological education credit may be earned for:

  • Regular work activities as a psychologist;
  • Membership, office in, or participation on boards or committees of professional organizations;
  • Independent, unstructured or self-structured learning;
  • Personal psychotherapy or personal growth experience;
  • Authoring or editing books or articles;
  • Obtaining or providing supervision or consultation from or under a psychologist or other professional who is not a Board approved continuing psychological education provider;
  • Home study except from providers approved by the American Psychological Association or any of its affiliates.

The licensee shall maintain, and make available upon request, documentation to substantiate continuing psychological education credit required by the Board. The licensee shall retain such documentation for two (2) years following the renewal period during which the continuing psychological education credit was required.

Florida Board of Psychology: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/psychology/

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2012 in General

 

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