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Alzheimers Caregiver Guide and Tips on Acute Hospitalization – Approved for ASHA CEUs

21 Oct

Alzheimers-Caregiver-GuideAlzheimer’s Caregiver Guide and Tips on Acute Hospitalization is a new online continuing education course approved by ASHA for 0.1 CEUs. This course is presented in two parts.

Part 1 offers strategies for managing the everyday challenges of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease, a difficult task that can quickly become overwhelming.

Research has shown that caregivers themselves often are at increased risk for depression and illness. Each day brings new challenges as the caregiver copes with changing levels of ability and new patterns of behavior. Many caregivers have found it helpful to use the strategies described in this course for dealing with difficult behaviors and stressful situations.

Part 2 includes tips on acute hospitalization, which presents a new environment filled with strange sights, odors and sounds, changes in daily routines, along with new medications and tests.

This section is intended to help professionals and family members meet the needs of hospitalized Alzheimer’s patients by offering facts about Alzheimer’s disease, communication tips, personal care techniques, and suggestions for working with behaviors and environmental factors in both the ER and in the hospital room. Course #10-81 | 2010 | 17 pages | 7 posttest questions

Click here to learn more!

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) and mark your answers on while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

Click here to order now!

Related Online CE Courses for Speech Language Pathologists:

Biology of Aging: Research Today for a Healthier Tomorrow is a 2-hour online course. What is aging? Can we live long and live well—and are they the same thing? Is aging in our genes? How does our metabolism relate to aging? Can your immune system still defend you as you age? Since the National Institute on Aging was established in 1974, scientists asking just such questions have learned a great deal about the processes associated with the biology of aging. Technology today supports research that years ago would have seemed possible only in a science fiction novel. This course introduces some key areas of research into the biology of aging. Each area is a part of a larger field of scientific inquiry. You can look at each topic individually, or you can step back to see how they fit together, interwoven to help us better understand aging processes. Research on aging is dynamic, constantly evolving based on new discoveries, and so this course also looks ahead to the future, as today’s research provides the strongest hints of things to come. Course #20-85 | 2012 | 30 pages | 15 posttest questions

The Dementias: Hope through Research is a 1-hour online course. A diagnosis of dementia can be frightening for those affected by the syndrome, their family members, and caretakers. Learning more about dementia can help. This course provides a general overview of dementia and specific types of dementia along with their signs and symptoms; lists risk factors that can increase a person’s chance of developing one or more kinds of dementia; describes how the disorders are diagnosed and treated, including drug therapy; and offers highlights of research that is supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute on Aging, both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Course #10-75 | 2012 | 20 pages | 10 posttest questions

Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: Intensifying the Research Effort is a 3-hour online course. This course, from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), focuses on research findings reported and projects funded in 2011 and the first half of 2012. These highlights, prepared by NIH’s National Institute on Aging (NIA), the lead institute within NIH for Alzheimer’s research, covers work by an active scientific community. This work aims to elucidate the basic mechanisms and risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease, and then apply this knowledge to the development and testing of new interventions to treat or prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The efforts of researchers and clinicians—made possible by the many people who volunteer for clinical studies and trials—may one day lead to a future free of this devastating disorder. This course details some of the recent progress toward that goal. Course #30-68 | 2012 | 39 pages | 21 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM); by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); by the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); by the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Source: https://www.pdresources.org/blog_data/alzheimers-caregiver-guide-approved-for-asha-ceus/

 

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