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Continuing Education and License Information for Tennessee Psychologists

06 Oct
Tennessee Psychologists Continuing Education and Licensing

Tennessee-licensed psychologists have a biennial license renewal with a birth month deadline. Continuing education is due by December 31st prior to the license renewal year.

Forty continuing education hours are required for license renewal. There are no limits on Type 1 courses (must have post-test), if APA-approved.

Three (3) hours of Tennessee code, rules and ethics are required at each renewal. Three hours of cultural diversity are also required at each renewal.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Continuing Education Courses of Interest to Psychologists

This CE test is based on the content of articles from The National Psychologist, September/October 2015 issue: Course 10-93 | 9 posttest questions Content for this test is available in the September/October 2015 issue of The National Psychologist.
HIV affects people of all ages, from children born to mothers with HIV, to adolescents, to adults, and elders. Unlike other viruses, the body cannot remove HIV completely. Once a person has HIV, it is there for life. The quality – and quantity – of that life will depend on adherence with treatment. People who live with HIV can live almost normal lifespans and have little risk of transmitting the disease if they use antiretroviral therapy appropriately under medical care. However, only 30% of HIV-infected people follow their antiretroviral regimen well enough to achieve viral suppression. This course will discuss adherence issues in populations at high risk for HIV infection and provide strategies for healthcare professionals to encourage people with HIV to seek and maintain medical treatment. Comorbidities with HIV; illicit drug use; medications; crime, punishment and treatment; pregnancy and HIV; sex workers and HIV; older adults and HIV; legal issues; and access to healthcare are also examined.
Self-defeating behaviors are negative on-going patterns of behaviors involving issues such as smoking, weight, inactive lifestyle, depression, anger, perfectionism, etc. This course is designed to teach concepts to eliminate these negative patterns. The course is educational: first you learn the model, then you apply it to a specific self-defeating behavior. A positive behavioral change is the outcome. Following the course, participants will be able to identify, analyze and replace their self-defeating behavior(s) with positive behavior(s). The course also provides an excellent psychological “tool” for clinicians to use with their clients. The author grants limited permission to photocopy forms and exercises included in this course for clinical use.
Clinicians and teachers working with students struggling at grade level are committed to raising their students’ achievement potential by creating opportunities to learn. In order to accomplish this, they need to learn new techniques that can help encourage discouraged students – particularly those who have different ways of learning – by supporting and motivating them without enabling self-defeating habits. This course will provide strategies and techniques for helping students minimize the patterns of “learned helplessness” they have adopted, appreciate and maximize their strengths, develop a growth mindset, value effort and persistence over success, view mistakes as opportunities to learn, and develop a love of learning that will help them take personal responsibility for their school work. The course video is split into 3 parts for your convenience.
Should therapists and counselors use humor as a therapeutic technique? If so, should they be formally trained in those procedures before their implementation? This course will review the risks and benefits of using humor in therapy and the relevant historical controversies of this proposal. The paucity of rigorous empirical research on the effectiveness of this form of clinical intervention is exceeded only by the absence of any training for those practitioners interested in applying humor techniques. In this course a representative sample of its many advocates’ recommendations to incorporate humor in the practice of psychological therapies is reviewed. Therapeutic humor is defined, the role of therapists’ personal qualities is discussed, and possible reasons for the profession’s past resistance to promoting humor in therapy are described. Research perspectives for the evaluation of humor training are presented with illustrative examples of important empirical questions still needing to be answered.
 
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Posted by on October 6, 2015 in CE Requirements, Psychology

 

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