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New 3-Hour CE Course – Codependency: Causes, Consequences and Cures

16 Oct
Codependency: Causes, Consequences and Cures – New 3-Hour Online CE Course from PDResources

By Deborah Day Poor LCSW

It’s highly unusual for a client to come to a therapy session and request to be treated for codependency. Instead, they will likely report symptoms of anxiety, depression, addictions, or talk about their relationship problems.

Codependence Causes, Consequences and CuresIf we scratch the surface of someone suffering from any of these ailments, we will most likely find a codependent. Consequently, we are actually treating codependency much of the time.

Codependency: Causes, Consequences and Cures is a new 3-hour online CEU course that offers strategies for therapists to use in working with clients who present with the characteristic behavior patterns of codependency. Starting with emphasis on the delicate process of building a caring therapeutic relationship with these clients, the author guides readers through the early shame-inducing parenting styles that inhibit the development of healthy self-esteem. Through personal stories and case studies, the author goes on to describe healing interventions that can help clients identify dysfunctional patterns in relationships, start leading balanced lives and connecting with others on a new and meaningful level. Evaluative questionnaires, journaling assignments and other exercises are included to help you help your clients to overcome codependency. Course #30-83 | 2015 | 40 pages | 21 posttest questions | $39  Click Here to Learn More…

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Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2015 in General

 

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