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Louisiana OT Continuing Education Requirements

11 Jul

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Louisiana-licensed occupational therapists have an annual license renewal with a last day of the birth month deadline. Twelve (12) hours of continuing education are required to renew a license.

There are no limits for online continuing education courses if AOTA-approved. 

Louisiana Board of Medical Examiners 
CE Required: 12 hours per year 
Online CE Allowed: No limit if AOTA-approved 
License Expiration: Last day of birth month, annually 
National Accreditation Accepted: AOTA 
Date of Info: 6/22/2016

Louisiana OTs can earn all 12 hours required for renewal through online courses offered on the occupational therapy page at PDResources.org. 

===>Click here to view AOTA-approved online CEU courses.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Online Continuing Education Courses for Occupational Therapists

Dysphagia: The Team Approach to Best Practice is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE) course that focuses on the interdisciplinary team approach to identifying, treating and managing dysphagia.Dysphagia is a wide spread problem in the elderly, with many going untreated. Older adults are at an increased risk due to having many factors that lead to swallowing difficulties. Some of these are a diagnosis of stroke, dementia, pneumonia and Parkinson’s disease. Many have generalized weakness and comorbidities that also contribute to a reduced swallowing response. The decreased ability to swallow can lead to other complications, but the largest concerns are with dehydration, weight loss and malnutrition.This course was developed to assist the interdisciplinary team [Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP), Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), Occupational Therapist (OT) and Social Worker] in the management of dysphagia. Topics covered include the swallowing process, types of dysphagia, risk factors, signs and symptoms, how dysphagia affects the body, screening and assessment, roles of the interdisciplinary team, nutrition, and treatment options (National Dysphagia Diet, thickened liquids, free water, and rehabilitative strategies).

Caffeine is a rapidly absorbed organic compound that acts as a stimulant in the human body. The average amount of caffeine consumed in the US is approximately 300 mg per person per day – the equivalent to between two and four cups of coffee – with coffee accounting for about three-fourths of the caffeine that is consumed in the American diet. This is considered to be a moderate caffeine intake, which, according to many studies, can promote a variety of health benefits.But some studies claim otherwise, even suggesting that one or two cups of coffee a day may negatively impact our health. So, what are we to believe?This course will analyze the potential health benefits, as well as the negative side effects, of caffeine consumption on a variety of health conditions, including: dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, headache, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, gallstones, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, fibrocystic breast conditions, premenstrual syndrome, pregnancy and lactation, osteoporosis, athletic performance, and weight control. 

Ethics for Occupational Therapists is a 3-hour online continuing education course that teaches OTs how to handle ethical and moral dilemmas in practice. Ethical and moral issues pervade our lives, especially in the healthcare arena. Occupational therapists are frequently confronted with a variety of ethical and moral dilemmas, and their decisions can have long-range effects both professionally and personally. Why does one decision win out over another? What does the decision process involve? How do these decisions impact those involved? This course will address these questions from the framework of ethical decision models and the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Code of Ethics.

Medical Marijuana is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that presents a summary of the current literature on the various medical, legal, educational, occupational, and ethical aspects of marijuana. In spite of the fact that nearly half of the states in this country have enacted legislation legalizing marijuana in some fashion, the reality is that neither the intended “medical” benefits of marijuana nor its known (and as yet unknown) adverse effects have been adequately examined using controlled studies. Conclusive literature remains sparse, and opinion remains divided and contentious.This course will address the major questions about marijuana that are as yet unanswered by scientific evidence. What are the known medical uses for marijuana? What is the legal status of marijuana in state and federal legislation? What are the interactions with mental health conditions like anxiety, depression, and suicidal behavior? Is marijuana addictive? Is marijuana a gateway drug? What are the adverse consequences of marijuana use? Do state medical marijuana laws increase the use of marijuana and other drugs? The course will conclude with a list of implications for healthcare and mental health practitioners.

Cyberbullying is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying.

 

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