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Are Some Kids More Predisposed to Become Narcissists?

08 Sep

By Aaron L. Pincus

are-some-kids-more-predisposed-to-become-narcissistsSome individuals are indeed more susceptible to developing a narcissistic personality. Narcissism is characterized by self-centeredness (“It’s all about me!”), grandiosity (“I’m better than you!”) and vanity (“Look at me!”).

It involves multifaceted psychological traits, motives and needs that influence how a person thinks, feels and behaves.

Given this complexity, developing this form of extreme self-love is not as simple as inheriting a particular gene or experiencing a specific event. Instead becoming a narcissist likely involves an intricate mix of genetic and psychological or environmental factors.

Currently we know more about the psychological side of the equation. So far researchers have identified two major trajectories that can lead to narcissistic tendencies. The first scenario involves children who receive unconditional positive feedback from a family member, teacher or coach, despite not displaying the attributes deserving of such praise. Social-learning theory, when applied to the development of narcissism, suggests that a person who receives constant admiration, regardless of his or her actual ability, will come to expect such feedback from everyone. Such a child may fail to acquire a realistic self-concept, one that acknowledges both their flaws and their virtues.

The second trajectory involves the opposite scenario. Children who grow up in families that are cold and depriving may also develop narcissistic personalities. Receiving inadequate validation and support can be painful and frustrating. To cope with this dejection, children may protect themselves by repressing negative feelings and replacing them with a distorted, grandiose self-concept. Similar to the first trajectory, the children’s self-concept can then become unrealistically inflated and inconsistent with their true skills and accomplishments. To support this view, they may also come to expect constant admiration from others.

These patterns can be hard to change. Narcissists frequently make good first impressions, but they struggle to maintain long-term relationships—both personal and professional. And although researchers have begun to develop psychotherapy-based interventions to curb narcissistic traits, narcissists often will not acknowledge that they need them.

Source: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/are-some-kids-more-likely-to-become-narcissists/

Related Online Continuing Education Courses

Improving Social Skills in Children & Adolescents is a 4-hour online continuing education course that discusses the social skills children and adolescents will need to develop to be successful in school and beyond. It will demonstrate the challenges and difficulties that arise from a deficit of these crucial skills, as well as the benefits and advantages that can come about with well-developed social skills.This course will also provide practical tools that teachers and therapists can employ to guide children to overcome their difficulties in the social realm and gain social competence. While there are hundreds of important social skills for students to learn, we can organize them into skill areas to make it easier to identify and determine appropriate interventions. This course is divided into 10 chapters, each detailing various aspects of social skills that children, teens, and adults must master to have normative, healthy relationships with the people they encounter every day. This course provides tools and suggestions that, with practice and support, can assist them in managing their social skills deficits to function in society and nurture relationships with the peers and adults in their lives.

 

It has long been observed that there are certain children who experience better outcomes than others who are subjected to similar adversities, and a significant amount of literature has been devoted to the question of why this disparity exists. Research has largely focused on what has been termed “resilience.” Health professionals are treating an increasing number of children who have difficulty coping with 21st century everyday life. Issues that are hard to deal with include excessive pressure to succeed in school, bullying, divorce, or even abuse at home. This course provides a working definition of resilience and descriptions of the characteristics that may be associated with better outcomes for children who confront adversity in their lives. It also identifies particular groups of children – most notably those with developmental challenges and learning disabilities – who are most likely to benefit from resilience training. The bulk of the course – presented in two sections – offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings.

 

Children with difficult temperaments and those with developmental delays may have learned to express their dissatisfaction with challenging and defiant behavior like whining, anger, temper tantrums or bad language. They sometimes engage in negative behavior or “misbehave” because they do not have the necessary skills – communicative or otherwise – to make their needs known. The purpose of this course is to teach clinicians effective and practical strategies to manage challenging and defiant behavior in their young clients. The course will also focus on how clinicians can educate parents on how to manage difficult behavior and avoid power struggles at home. The dynamics and techniques described in this course are intended for use with typically functioning children and those with developmental or language delays. They are not generally adequate or even appropriate for children with serious behavior conditions like oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorders.

 

This is a test only course (book not included). The book (or e-book) can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.  This CE test is based on Rethinking Narcissism (HarperCollins 2015, 256 pp.), which has enjoyed international expert and critical acclaim for its exciting blend of empirical rigor, practical strategies, and compelling narrative style. In it you’ll discover: Throughout, you’ll find easy-to-follow templates and concrete examples for helping people who suffer from either too much—or too little—narcissism.

 

Professional Development Resources is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA): the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners. We are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion.

 

 

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