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Category Archives: General

Depression and The Emotion Processing Networks in the Brain

 

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From the University of Illinois at Chicago

Parts of the brain that work together to process emotion are different in people who have suffered from multiple bouts of depression. Researchers say that by identifying risk factors, mental health professions can begin to understand and treat this condition more effectively for the long term.
 
The study, led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, is published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

“Half of people who have a first depressive episode will go on to have another within two years,” says Scott Langenecker, associate professor of psychiatry and psychology at UIC and corresponding author on the study.

Disruptions in the network of areas of the brain that are simultaneously active during problem-solving and emotional processing have been implicated in several mental illnesses, including depression. But in addition, “hyperconnectivity,” or too much connection, within the “resting network,” or areas active during rest and self-reflection, has also been linked to depression.

“If we can identify different network connectivity patterns that are associated with depression, then we may be able to determine which are risk factors for poorer outcomes down the line, such as having multiple episodes, and we can keep those patients on preventive or maintenance medication,” Langenecker explained. “We can also start to see what medications work best for people with different connectivity patterns, to develop more personalized treatment plans.”

In previous research, Langenecker found that the emotional and cognitive brain networks were hyperconnected in young adults who had depression. Areas of the brain related to rumination — thinking about the same thing over and over again — a known risk factor for depression, were also overly connected in adolescents who had experienced depression.

In the new study, Langenecker said he and his coworkers wanted to see if different patterns of network-disruption would show up in young adults who had experienced only one episode of depression versus several episodes.

The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, to scan the brains of 77 young adults (average age: 21.) Seventeen of the participants were experiencing major depression at the time of the scan, while 34 were currently well. Of these 51 patients, 36 had experienced at least one episode of depression in the past, and these individuals were compared to 26 participants who had never experienced a major depressive episode. None were taking psychiatric medication at the time they were scanned.

All fMRI scans were done in a resting state — to show which areas of the brain are most synchronously active as one relaxes and lets their mind wander.

The researchers found that the amygdala, a region involved in detecting emotion, is decoupled from the emotional network in people who have had multiple episodes of depression. This may cause emotional-information processing to be less accurate, Langenecker said, and could explain “negative processing-bias” in which depression sufferers perceive even neutral information as negative.

The researchers also saw that participants who had had at least one prior depressive episode — whether or not they were depressed at the time of the scan — exhibited increased connectivity between the resting and cognitive networks.

“This may be an adaptation the brain makes to help regulate emotional biases or rumination,” Langenecker said.

“Since this study provides just a snapshot of the brain at one point in time, longer-term studies are needed, to determine whether the patterns we saw may be predictive of a future of multiple episodes for some patients and might help us identify who should have maintenance treatments and targets for new preventive treatments,” he said.
 
Original: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160120143007.htm

Related Continuing Education Courses

Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression.Some types of depression tend to run in families. However, depression can occur in people without family histories of depression too. Scientists are studying certain genes that may make some people more prone to depression. Some genetics research indicates that risk for depression results from the influence of several genes acting together with environmental or other factors. In addition, trauma, loss of a loved one, a difficult relationship, or any stressful situation may trigger a depressive episode. Other depressive episodes may occur with or without an obvious trigger.This introductory course provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.

 

This CE test is based on the book “The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction: A Guide to Coping with the Grief, Stress and Anger that Trigger Addictive Behaviors” (2012, 232 pages). This workbook presents a comprehensive approach to working with clients in recovery from addictive behaviors and is unique in that it addresses the underlying loss that clients have experienced that may be fueling addictive behaviors. Counseling skills from the field of mindfulness therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and dialectical behavioral therapy are outlined in a clear and easy-to-implement style. Healthy strategies for coping with grief, depression, anxiety, and anger are provided along with ways to improve interpersonal relationships.

 

This is a test only course (book not included). The book can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.This CE test is based on the book “Suicide & Psychological Pain: Prevention that Works” (2012, 147 pages). Jack Klott, using case studies taken from his 45-year-career as a suicidologist, brings to life the ideas, theories and concepts surrounding suicide and self-mutilation including risk factors, assessment, and treatment components. He presents information about which personality types are most vulnerable to acts of suicide and self-mutilation, as well as the essential link between these behaviors and addiction disorders. Jack Klott’s work focuses on the treatment relationship between therapist and client and the hope for both the suicidal and self-harm client in achieving treatment goals. This narrative is interwoven with case histories and treatment outcomes which yield a personal and fascinating look into the work of treating suicidal clients.

 

Nearly every client who walks through a health professional’s door is experiencing some form of anxiety. Even if they are not seeking treatment for a specific anxiety disorder, they are likely experiencing anxiety as a side effect of other clinical issues. For this reason, a solid knowledge of anxiety management skills should be a basic component of every therapist’s repertoire. Clinicians who can teach practical anxiety management techniques have tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses. Anxiety management benefits the clinician as well, helping to maintain energy, focus, and inner peace both during and between sessions. The purpose of this course is to offer a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) to offer home study continuing education for NCCs (#5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

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Minimalizing the Mental Health Impact on Kids of Divorce

By Michael O. Schroeder 

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New research shows how resilient kids can be when impacted by divorce. This article notes strategies for helping kids to cope when their parents divorce. 

With up to half of marriages in the U.S. ending in divorce – and rates of divorce higher for subsequent marriages – many children face challenges from their parents’ split that can follow them for a lifetime, including into their own relationships as adults.

However, recent research evaluating the family breakdown and the impact of dads leaving the home after parents part ways finds that while adolescent children are more likely to face short-term mental health challenges – from stress and anxiety to symptoms of depression following the split – these issues tend to relent after four to nine months. The researchers say parents and their kids can be encouraged by the findings, while also calling for increased vigilance by parents to ensure their children don’t face longer-term psychological issues. “They may need informal support or therapy to prevent further progression of depressive symptoms and the development of more serious mental health problems,” Jennifer O’Loughlin, the principal researcher for the study and a professor at the University of Montreal, ​ said in a statement.

Though nothing is simple about dissolving a marriage, experts say there are some straightforward steps parents can take to help children cope with divorce, including adolescents who already face everyday disruptive changes on their way to becoming adults. “One of the things that we know about divorce is that it interrupts the normal developmental sequence of a kid’s life,” says Steven Harris,​ a professor of family social science at the University of Minnesota. For example, it may distract from a child’s studies or peer relationships and make it hard to focus on the challenges of simply being a kid.

“Most kids that aren’t exposed to high conflict marriages are not worried about their parents’ marriage at all. There’s food on the table, there’s the natural stressors of the day, there’s my homework,” Harris says. “But then you add in your parents’ possible divorce transition, and now you’re wondering about a host of different things you’ve never had to think about before.” For some, that upheaval can lead to depression and anxiety, he says.

Experts stress that the experience for every child is unique to that individual – and the circumstances of the divorce. “The research is pretty solid that suggests that this is a difficult transition and there are impacts for kids. But nailing down what the specific impacts are going to be – that gets a little tougher,” Harris says. He notes that gender seems to play a role in how a child responds to their parents’ split. “Some of the things we know is that young girls tend to get more depressed and insulated and turn inward,” he says. “Young boys tend to turn outward – they express their anger in different ways than younger women.”

Carl Pickhardt​, a psychologist in Austin, Texas, who has written extensively on parenting – including advice for divorced parents – breaks down the impact of that change in a child’s life into what he describes as four, normal mental health challenges: “Obviously kids have a certain amount of despondency because of the loss – they’ve lost the intact family,” he says. That’s one. “​There is anxiety, because now the world has changed and all of a sudden the family system is being reorganized and there’s a lot that is unknown.” Add to that: “There’s usually some anger, because there’s been a violation … Kids assumed that their parents would always be together, and the family would always be intact. Now all of a sudden what’s happening is the parents are deciding to separate the family.” And, of course, there’s stress – so much to let go, so much change to adjust to.

He says it’s important during the transition to understand that these are normal healthy responses to the upheaval of divorce. “It definitely is a watershed event in the life of a family,” he says. “So the issue is, how does the kid manage their despondency, their anxiety, their anger and their stress? That’s what you look at – can the kid manage to talk about it and work through it, or do they get stuck in some way?”  Read More Here…

Original: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/health-wellness/articles/2016-01-19/minding-the-kids-in-divorce-minimizing-the-mental-health-impact

Courses of Interest: 

Parents who have chosen not to remain together as a couple are still responsible for the healthy upbringing of their mutual children. They must face not only the typical challenges of parenting, but also those unique tasks that come from living in separate homes. While therapists and other professionals have long worked with intact couples on parenting skills, they must now also be versed in teaching parents who live in separate homes how to establish healthy “co-parenting” abilities as well. This course will provide a basic understanding of the significant issues unique to children of split couples, and how to help co-parents address these issues while at the same time overcoming the common blocks that prevent them from working together in a healthy way.

 

This is a test only course (book not included). The book can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.This CE test is based on the book “Separation Anxiety in Children & Adolescents” (2005, 298 pages). The book presents a research-based approach to understanding the challenges of separation anxiety and helping children, adolescents, and their parents build the skills they need to overcome it. The authors provide step-by-step guidelines for implementing the entire process of therapy-from intake and assessment through coping skills training, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and relapse prevention. Featuring in-depth case examples, the book is written for maximum accessibility for all clinicians, including those with limited cognitive-behavioral therapy experience, who treat separation anxiety and other childhood anxiety disorders. Useful reproducible handouts include the Separation Anxiety Assessment Scales, which facilitate individualized case formulation and treatment planning.

 

It has long been observed that there are certain children who experience better outcomes than others who are subjected to similar adversities, and a significant amount of literature has been devoted to the question of why this disparity exists. Research has largely focused on what has been termed “resilience.” Health professionals are treating an increasing number of children who have difficulty coping with 21st century everyday life. Issues that are hard to deal with include excessive pressure to succeed in school, bullying, divorce, or even abuse at home. This course provides a working definition of resilience and descriptions of the characteristics that may be associated with better outcomes for children who confront adversity in their lives. It also identifies particular groups of children – most notably those with developmental challenges and learning disabilities – who are most likely to benefit from resilience training. The bulk of the course – presented in two sections – offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590);  the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

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Why 2016 Should Be Your Year for Yoga

By

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Yoga can be beneficial for numerous health and mental health issues. Here are some great reasons to get started with yoga fitness this year.

Each year, many people fall short of their goals. But it’s not necessarily their fault. Too often, they get pulled into gimmicky exercise trends that do not deliver the results they promise. Yoga, by contrast, is here to stay – because it works. Here’s why:

  1. It’s convenient.

Nobody has the time to spend hours working out. If you do spend more than an hour exercising, you’re not optimizing your productivity. In other words, your time could be better spent elsewhere. Many yoga sequences are short and powerful and only take 15 to 20 minutes to complete. Yoga does not require any equipment; just your willingness to get it done. You can practice yoga anywhere, anytime. The luxury of being able to work out at home increases the probability that you will do it and stick with it for the long haul.

  1. It’s safe.

I am all for mixing up your workouts. But if you have a history of injuries, it can be dangerous to adhere to hyper-competitive, high-impact, over-complicated types of training. Yoga demands that you slow down and move with your breath. The biggest rule in yoga is: If it hurts, don’t do it. While yoga flows will challenge you to your edge, the practice asks you to err on the side of caution rather than push past what is safe.

  1. It’s fun.

If you don’t enjoy your training program, you’ll likely feel burnt out and either jump from one routine to the next without anything to show for it or quit altogether. Yoga offers a light-heartedness that is unlike any other workout. Learning new poses and different flows will help you take a more youthful perspective on your physical practice. That, in turn, translates to the way you see the world around you.

  1. It’s encouraging.

While some other training philosophies provoke you to do more and suggest that you are not good enough by demanding you to try harder, yoga’s philosophy suggests that you should be content as you are while you challenge yourself completely. Yoga builds you up with positive reinforcement and prioritizes self-care. We are already saturated with enough pressure-packed situations in life; your workout should not feel degrading or negative. The underlying sentiment in yoga is to see the good in yourself first while you strive to be better each time you practice.

  1. It’s effective.

The most important quality of a strong yoga practice is that it works. Yoga can build strength, flexibility and endurance in the same workout. If your goal is to burn fat and lose weight, yoga can do the trick. Some body weight exercises, for example, can be performed in a circuit (meaning you do one after the other), so they pack a punch and will rev up your metabolism. This technique will help you become surprisingly strong without bulking up.

Read More…

Related CE Courses for Mental Health

This CE test is based on the book “Yoga as Medicine: the Yogic Prescription for Health and Healing” (2007, 592 pages). This course is intended to correct common misconceptions about yoga and to provide a framework for understanding the conditions under which yoga may be beneficial for a variety of health and mental health issues. The general health benefits of yoga are discussed, followed by a discussion of yoga’s role in treating anxiety and panic attacks, arthritis, asthma, back pain, cancer, carpal tunnel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, diabetes, fibromyalgia, headaches, heart disease, high blood pressure, HIV/AIDS, infertility, insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, menopause, multiple sclerosis, and obesity. This course is intended for health and mental health professionals who have an interest in integrative and alternative medicine.

 

Rebecca E. Williams, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist, clinical supervisor, and award-winning author.  She specializes in recovery from mental illness, addictions, and life’s challenges.  Dr. Williams received her master’s degree in Counseling and Consulting Psychology from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  She is currently a clinic director at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System.  Dr. Williams is Associate Clinical Professor of Psyc…

 

The breath is intrinsically linked to the nervous system and has a powerful effect on both the mind and body, yet has been largely overlooked as a mechanism of change within medicine and mental health. This course is based on an audio book by Andrew Weil, MD, Breathing: The Master Key to Self-Healing (1999), in which he describes the physiological mechanisms by which the breath affects the mind and body. After an introductory lecture, he teaches several calming, relaxing breathing techniques, as well as an energizing breathing technique. This audio book is a valuable resource for therapists and medical professionals to learn these techniques and to use with clients.

 

This course will give you the mindfulness skills necessary to work directly, effectively and courageously, with your own and your client’s life struggles. Compassion towards others starts with compassion towards self. Practicing mindfulness cultivates our ability to pay intentional attention to our experience from moment to moment. Mindfulness teaches us to become patiently and spaciously aware of what is going on in our mind and body without judgment, reaction, and distraction, thus inviting into the clinical process, the inner strengths and resources that help achieve healing results not otherwise possible. Bringing the power of mindful presence to your clinical practice produces considerable clinical impact in the treatment of anxiety, depression, PTSD, chronic pain, high blood pressure, fibromyalgia, colitis/IBS, and migraines/tension headaches. The emphasis of this course is largely experiential and will offer you the benefit of having a direct experience of the mindfulness experience in a safe and supportive fashion. You will utilize the power of “taking the client there” as an effective technique of introducing the mindful experience in your practice setting. As you will learn, the mindfulness practice has to be experienced rather than talked about. This course will provide you with an excellent understanding of exactly what mindfulness is, why it works, and how to use it. You will also develop the tools that help you introduce mindful experiences in your practice, and how to deal with possible client resistance.

 

Nearly every client who walks through a health professional’s door is experiencing some form of anxiety. Even if they are not seeking treatment for a specific anxiety disorder, they are likely experiencing anxiety as a side effect of other clinical issues. For this reason, a solid knowledge of anxiety management skills should be a basic component of every therapist’s repertoire. Clinicians who can teach practical anxiety management techniques have tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses. Anxiety management benefits the clinician as well, helping to maintain energy, focus, and inner peace both during and between sessions. The purpose of this course is to offer a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 
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Posted by on January 14, 2016 in General

 

Cyberbullying Myths You Need to Know

By Tamekia Reece

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Here are some very real myths about cyberbullying you will want to know to protect your children and yourself.

MYTHS and TRUTHS about bullying and technology

Suppose you were asked: What is cyberbullying?

Could someone get in trouble for it? Is it as bad as face-to-face bullying? What should or shouldn’t you do if you’re being cyberbullied?

Could you answer each of those questions? If not, you’re definitely not alone. Although cyberbullying is talked about often in real life, magazines, movies, and on the Internet, a lot of misinformation still exists. To help keep you safe (and out of trouble), here’s the real deal on cyberbullying.

MYTH: Everyone experiences online bullying — cyberbullying

TRUTH: Anyone who spends time in the digital world will come across negativity. It might mean being called a hater because you disagree with someone on an online message board, receiving a mean text message from a friend you’re having a disagreement with, or getting a “that’s dumb” comment about your YouTube video. Those things aren’t cyberbullying. “Cyberbullying is when someone repeatedly targets you in a negative manner using electronic media: texting, instant messaging, calls, e-mails, online forums, or social networks,” says Dr. Gwenn O’Keeffe, author of CyberSafe.

MYTH: Cyberbullying isn’t as bad as face-to-face bullying

TRUTH: It’s possibly worse. When someone bullies you in person, the bullying stops when you’re no longer around that person. With cyberbullying, even if you turn off your computer or cell phone, the hurtful messages will be waiting when you turn the device back on. That constant harassment can have damaging effects. “Cyberbullying victims may experience anxiety, fear, self-esteem issues, or physical symptoms like headaches, stomachaches, or trouble sleeping,” O’Keeffe says. Some teens, she adds, feel so hopeless they think they have to take drastic steps to end their pain.

That almost happened with Pennsylvania teen Heather.* After a classmate noticed she and Heather had identical pencil cases, the girl told her friends Heather had copied. “They contacted me on Face-book chat asking what my problem was and saying I was stupid,” Heather says. Because it was about something so simple, Heather thought it would be a one-time thing. But they repeatedly sent messages for more than a month, calling Heather names, saying she had problems, and telling her everyone disliked her.

“I was depressed, felt really bad about myself, and (believed] no one liked me,” Heather says. “I even thought about hurting myself physically.” Fortunately, Heather didn’t act on her thoughts and instead got counseling. However, the many news reports of teens committing suicide or harming others because of cyberbullying show some teens aren’t as lucky.

MYTH: Only known troublemakers are likely to cyberbully

TRUTH: The anonymous nature of the Internet makes it easy to say and do things you wouldn’t in person, O’Keeffe says. Anyone could be behind the screen: the swim team captain, the most popular guy at school, the quiet girl from science class.

Plus, people sometimes get caught up in cyberbullying without intentionally meaning harm, says Thomas Jacobs, a retired judge and the author of Teen Cyberbullying Investigated. Think about it: When a celeb is a trending topic on Twitter, people tweet insults and jokes because they’re bored, they think it’s fun, or they don’t want to be left out. The same can happen with teens. “If the bully is popular, other teens may feel pressured to join in because ‘everyone else is doing it,'” Jacobs explains.

MYTH: Cyberbullies are never caught

TRUTH: With a little investigative work, law enforcement officials can trace just about anything you do online or through a cell phone back to you, says Jacobs. And cyberbullying, depending on the circumstances, can have severe consequences. “Not only may there be punishments at home, bullies may face suspension, expulsion, or other disciplinary action at school, and there can also be legal consequences — like your parents being sued or criminal charges being filed against you,” Jacobs says.

MYTH: Fighting back online will stop the cyberbullying

TRUTH: Doctoring your bully’s online photos or creating a slam book probably won’t make him or her leave you alone. It will most likely start a cyber war. “Instead of trying to retaliate against the bully, it’s best to save copies of harassing messages or online posts [in case you need them as proof later], and then ignore the person,” Jacobs says. Many bullies like the attention they get from bothering others, so if you ignore a bully by not responding and blocking the person from contacting you by phone, IM, e-mail, or your social networking profiles, he or she may get bored and leave you alone.

If you have a bully who just won’t quit (or you’re being threatened), it’s time to call in some adult help. Don’t worry about losing your phone or Internet privileges if you tell your parents. You most likely won’t: Being cyberbullied isn’t your fault, and parents usually understand that, Jacobs says. Notifying your parents or other trusted adults, such as your school principal or counselor, is a good idea because they may be able to do things you can’t — such as talking with the bully’s parents, reporting the bully’s behavior to an Internet service provider, or if it’s really bad, contacting law enforcement officials. Whatever you do, don’t think you have to deal with it on your own. The important thing to remember, Jacobs says, is no one has to suffer from cyberbullying, because help is available. CH

31 percent of teens admit they have said something online that they would not have said face-to-face.

Source: GFI Software 2011 Parent-Teen Internet Safety Report

Need Cyberbullying Help?

www.stopcyberbullying.org. This Web site by the group WiredSafety includes information on identifying cyberbullying, preventing it, and how to handle it if it happens to you.

www.stopbullying.gov. This government Web site has a ton of information on both bullying and cyberbullying.

www.athinline.org. Get facts on digital abuse and cyberbullying and learn how to deal with those things and help others at this Web site from MTV.

Bully Block app. Block unwanted text messages, pictures, and calls with this app for Android phones. You can also record to a secret file and send the information to your parents.

Think About It…

Why, do you think, is it so easy for cyberbullying to take hold and continue? What are some ways teens who are bystanders can help stop cyberbullying?

Source: Reece, T. (2012). Cyberbullying 411. Current Health Teens, 38(5), 7-9.

Related Continuing Education Course for Mental Health Professionals

Bullies have moved from the playground and workplace to the online world, where anonymity can facilitate bullying behavior. Cyberbullying is intentional, repeated harm to another person using communication technology. It is not accidental or random. It is targeted to a person with less perceived power. This may be someone younger, weaker, or less knowledgeable about technology. Any communication device may be used to harass or intimidate a victim, such as a cell phone, tablet, or computer. Any communication platform may host cyberbullying: social media sites (Facebook, Twitter), applications (Snapchat, AIM), websites (forums or blogs), and any place where one person can communicate with – or at – another person electronically. The short and long-term effects of bullying are considered as significant as neglect or maltreatment as a type of child abuse. This course reviews evidenced-based research for identification, management and prevention of cyberbullying in children, adolescents and adults. It will describe specific cyberbullying behaviors, review theories that attempt to explain why bullying happens, list the damaging effects that befall its victims, and discuss strategies professionals can use to prevent or manage identified cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a fast-growing area of concern and all healthcare professionals should be equipped to spot the signs and provide support for our patients and clients, as well as keep up with the technology that drives cyberbullying.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

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PDResources Customer Rewards – Save 25% on All CEUs Now

We hope 2016 is off to a great start for you! Now that the holidays are over and we’ve survived the first week back to work, it’s a great time to get a head start on our upcoming CE needs.

In case you missed the postcard we sent last month, I wanted to remind you that as a loyal customer you are entitled to Save 25% on ALL CEUs ALL Year @ PDR:

Customer-Rewards-2016

Enter promotion code PDRPC253 at checkout and click ‘update’ to redeem. Valid on future orders only. Coupon expires 12/31/2016.

Gina Stella

Just our way of saying thank you for your business. We look forward to another great year together.

Best wishes for an amazing 2016,
Gina Ulery, MS, RD, LD/N
Director of Operations & Marketing
Professional Development Resources

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

Popular CE Courses from Professional Development Resources

 

Caffeine is a rapidly absorbed organic compound that acts as a stimulant in the human body. The average amount of caffeine consumed in the US is approximately 300 mg per person per day – the equivalent to between two and four cups of coffee – with coffee accounting for about three-fourths of the caffeine that is consumed in the American diet. This is considered to be a moderate caffeine intake, which, according to many studies, can promote a variety of health benefits.But some studies claim otherwise, even suggesting that one or two cups of coffee a day may negatively impact our health. So, what are we to believe?This course will analyze the potential health benefits, as well as the negative side effects, of caffeine consumption on a variety of health conditions, including: dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, headache, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, gallstones, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, fibrocystic breast conditions, premenstrual syndrome, pregnancy and lactation, osteoporosis, athletic performance, and weight control.

 

This is the first course in a three part series and includes the story of Deirdre Rand’s journey with her animal companions and the lessons learned from the challenges and rewards of those relationships. Also discussed are temperament, socialization and training; the role of the neurohormone oxytocin in strengthening the human-companion animal bond; the founding of the three major organizations which register volunteer handler/therapy teams, along with the contributions of key historic figures in developing animal-assisted therapy as we know it today; examples of animal-assisted interventions with dogs, cats and other animals; and attributes of a great therapy animal and a great handler.

 

In spite of the fact that nearly half of the states in this country have enacted legislation legalizing marijuana in some fashion, the reality is that neither the intended “medical” benefits of marijuana nor its known (and as yet unknown) adverse effects have been adequately examined using controlled studies. Conclusive literature remains sparse, and opinion remains divided and contentious. This course is intended to present a summary of the current literature on the various medical, legal, educational, occupational, and ethical aspects of marijuana. It will address the major questions about marijuana that are as yet unanswered by scientific evidence. What are the known medical uses for marijuana? What is the legal status of marijuana in state and federal legislation? What are the interactions with mental health conditions like anxiety, depression, and suicidal behavior? Is marijuana addictive? Is marijuana a gateway drug? What are the adverse consequences of marijuana use? Do state medical marijuana laws increase the use of marijuana and other drugs? The course will conclude with a list of implications for healthcare and mental health practitioners.
 
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Posted by on January 9, 2016 in Continuing Education, General

 

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MDMA Used to Treat PTSD in Vets

By Suzi Gage

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A study in Great Britain shows that MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy reduces symptoms of PTSD. Interestingly, the study also shows that the drug does not harm memory or concentration in veterans. Researchers also found that the drug does not induce drug abuse. 

MDMA (the illegal drug ecstasy) may provide long term benefits as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a study which looked at its use alongside psychotherapy.

The research was a follow up to an earlier study published last year in which a group of 12 patients with chronic treatment resistant PTSD were given MDMA, and compared with another group of eight patients who were not, during and after psychotherapeutic treatment for their PTSD.

The new paper, which is published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, has followed up all but one of the original participants, up to six years after they were treated with MDMA. The researchers found that their PTSD symptoms remained reduced, they didn’t go on to abuse drugs, and there was no harm to memory and concentration after the treatment.

PTSD can be debilitating to those who suffer from it and there is a need for more effective treatment options. Some people vividly relive traumatic events in their past via uncontrollable flashbacks or nightmares; often those suffering from it will avoid anything linked to the traumatic event, which can lead to difficulties in daily life (if a person was assaulted while shopping for example, they may be unable to cope in crowded places afterwards).

In the original study, people were given MDMA up to a maximum of three times, and in a therapeutic setting (including extended therapy sessions involving overnight stays), so short term effects of the drug could be monitored, and long term harms would be unlikely. The people recruited for the study were those who had already received conventional treatment for PTSD, which had been unsuccessful. Although the number of people in the study was very small, they found that both groups’ symptoms improved over time – those who received MDMA as well as psychotherapy showed a greater improvement up to two months after the end of treatment. Read More…

 

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Holiday CEU Sale – Only 5 Days Left to Save

Time is running out to save up 30% on CE and stock up on Year-End savings:

Holiday-Sale

Your holiday savings will automatically apply at checkout:

20% off orders totaling $1 – $49

25% off orders totaling $50 – $99

30% off orders totaling $100 or more!

Sale ends December 31, 2015. Valid on future orders only. Shop now!

Discount will automatically apply at checkout based on order total (after coupons). Separate orders cannot be combined to receive greater discount.

Here’s to ringing in a prosperous, healthy and happy New Year!

Your friends @ PDR,
Gina, Carmen, Leo & Cathy

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Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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