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New Study Finds Marijuana Effective in Treating Depression

medical marijuana and depressionNew Study Finds Marijuana To Be Effective Against Depression

The Huffington Post  |  By Carolyn Gregoire

Research has suggested that cannabis may be a promising treatment option for a number of different physical and mental health conditions, from post-traumatic stress disorder to chronic pain. A study released this week suggests that depression can be added to that list.

Neuroscientists from the University of Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions found that endocannabinoids — chemical compounds in the brain that activate the same receptors as THC, an active compound in marijuana — may be helpful in treating depression that results from chronic stress.

In studies on rats, the researchers found that chronic stress reduced the production of endocannabinoids, which affect our cognition, emotion and behavior, and have been linked to reduced feelings of pain and anxiety, increases in appetite and overall feelings of well-being. The body naturally produces these compounds, which are similar to the chemicals in cannabis. Reduction of endocannabinoid production may be one reason that chronic stress is a major risk factor in the development of depression.

Then, the research team administered marijuana cannabinoids to the rats, finding it to be an effective way to restore endocannabinoid levels in their brains — possibly, thereby, alleviating some symptoms of depression.

“Using compounds derived from cannabis — marijuana — to restore normal endocannabinoid function could potentially help stabilize moods and ease depression,” lead researcher Dr. Samir Haj-Dahmane said in a university press release.

Recent research around marijuana’s effect on symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder further bolsters the Buffalo neuroscientists’ findings, since both disorders involve the way the brain responds to stress. A study published last year in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, for instance, found synthetic cannabinoids triggered changes in brain centers associated with traumatic memories in rats, preventing some of the behavioral and physiological symptoms of PTSD. Another study published last year found that patients who smoked cannabis experienced a 75 percent reduction in PTSD symptoms.

However, it’s important to note that the relationship between marijuana and depression is complex. Some research has suggested that regular and heavy marijuana smokers are at a higher risk for depression, although a causal link between cannabis use and depression has not been established. More studies are needed in order to determine whether, and how, marijuana might be used in a clinical context for patients with depression.

Read the full study here.

Original: 
New Study Finds Marijuana To Be Effective Against Depression

Continuing Education Courses on Depression and Anxiety

Rebecca E. Williams, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist, clinical supervisor, and award-winning author.  She specializes in recovery from mental illness, addictions, and life’s challenges.  Dr. Williams received her master’s degree in Counseling and Consulting Psychology from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  She is currently a clinic director at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System.  Dr. Williams is Associate Clinical Professor of Psyc…
Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression.Some types of depression tend to run in families. However, depression can occur in people without family histories of depression too. Scientists are studying certain genes that may make some people more prone to depression. Some genetics research indicates that risk for depression results from the influence of several genes acting together with environmental or other factors. In addition, trauma, loss of a loved one, a difficult relationship, or any stressful situation may trigger a depressive episode. Other depressive episodes may occur with or without an obvious trigger.This introductory course provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options.Course #10-72 | 2014 | 14 pages | 10 posttest questions
This is a test only course (book not included). The book can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.This CE test is based on the book “Suicide & Psychological Pain: Prevention that Works” (2012, 147 pages). Jack Klott, using case studies taken from his 45-year-career as a suicidologist, brings to life the ideas, theories and concepts surrounding suicide and self-mutilation including risk factors, assessment, and treatment components. He presents information about which personality types are most vulnerable to acts of suicide and self-mutilation, as well as the essential link between these behaviors and addiction disorders. Jack Klott’s work focuses on the treatment relationship between therapist and client and the hope for both the suicidal and self-harm client in achieving treatment goals. This narrative is interwoven with case histories and treatment outcomes which yield a personal and fascinating look into the work of treating suicidal clients.Course #30-70 | 21 posttest questions
Nearly every client who walks through a health professional’s door is experiencing some form of anxiety. Even if they are not seeking treatment for a specific anxiety disorder, they are likely experiencing anxiety as a side effect of other clinical issues. For this reason, a solid knowledge of anxiety management skills should be a basic component of every therapist’s repertoire. Clinicians who can teach practical anxiety management techniques have tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses. Anxiety management benefits the clinician as well, helping to maintain energy, focus, and inner peace both during and between sessions. The purpose of this course is to offer a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools. Course #40-12 | 2007 | 41 pages | 30 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC Provider #5590); by the American Psychological Association (APA); by the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (Provider #50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion); by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (Approval #PCE1625); by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (Provider #114); by the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors and Marriage & Family Therapists (Provider #193); and by the *Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage & Family Therapist Board (Provider #RCST100501). *Ohio MFTs: check CE accreditation statement for specific course approval – if Ohio is not listed, the course is not approved.

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2015 in General

 

Catch the Dog Days of Summer Sale at PDResources – Last Chance to Save 30%

​Check Out the Dog Days of Summer Sale at PDResources and Save 30% – Hurry Today is the Last Day!

I hope you had a fantastic weekend and are enjoying the Dog Days of Summer Sale!
Don’t forget, today is the last day to enjoy 30% Off ALL Online CE Courses

 PDResources Dog Days of Summer Sale

Save 30% on any and/or all of our online, video or book-based CE courses – order now and complete when you need the credit. Click here to stock up!

Your 30% discount should automatically apply at checkout. But if for any reason it doesn’t, just enter coupon code DogDays2015 and click ‘update’ to apply.

Gina-Ulery

Have a great week, and please let me know if you have any questions. We’re here to help.

Your friend in CE,

Gina Ulery, MS, RDN, LDN
Director of Operations
Professional Development Resources

Sale ends @ midnight tonight!

Offer valid on future orders only. One coupon may be used per order.

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Professional Development Resources allows you the flexibility to earn CEU credits at your own pace and according to your own schedule, wherever you are. You can explore courses, register, study, take exams and earn your accredited continuing education units all online. Over 100 online, video and book-based courses are available. Read what our customers are saying.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners. Professional Development Resources is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

Source: Last Chance to Save 30% – Dog Days of Summer Sale Ends Tonight

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2015 in General

 

PDResources Sale – Save 30% on All Online CEUs

30% Off ALL Online CEUs

Dog Days of Summer CEU Sale @ pdresources

Enjoy 30% Off ALL Online CEUs, now through Monday in our Dog Days of Summer CEU Sale!

Dog Days of Summer CEU Sale

Your 30% discount should automatically apply at checkout. But if for any reason it doesn’t, just enter coupon code DogDays2015 and click ‘update’ to apply.

That’s right – you can save 30% on any and/or all of our online, video or book-based CE courses, now through Monday! Click here to stock up!

You can buy now and save – and then complete when you need the credit (or have the time!).

Sale ends Monday, August 10, 2015.

Offer valid on future orders only. One coupon may be used per order.

Professional Development ResourcesProfessional Development Resources allows you the flexibility to earn CEU credits at your own pace and according to your own schedule, wherever you are. You can explore courses, register, study, take exams and earn your accredited continuing education units all online. Over 100 online, video and book-based courses are available. Read what our customers are saying.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners. Professional Development Resources is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

Professional Development Resources, Inc. is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are located in Jacksonville, Florida. Federal Tax ID 59-3138625.

Source: http://www.pdresources.org/blog_data/30-off-all-online-ceus

 
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Posted by on August 6, 2015 in General

 

7 Things That Are Good to Know in People with Anxiety

7 Things To Know About People with Anxiety7 things people with anxiety want their loved ones to know

Written by Sammy Nickall

I have anxiety, and I believe I can speak for everyone with anxiety when I say this: it’s gotta be hard to be close to us. But there are seven things we want you to know that we don’t always know how to tell you.

1. It doesn’t have to do with you.

It can be pretty exhausting ruminating about everything we possibly have done wrong, are doing wrong, or could do wrong. We may want to sit and cry sometimes. We may be uninterested in our activities. We may snap at you, even though you absolutely don’t deserve it. We may even get nervous that you don’t love us anymore, even if you’ve given us no indication of this.

We want you to know above all else that it doesn’t have to do with you. It’s not your fault. We love you, and we’re so, so sorry if we ever give the impression that we don’t. We just don’t love our brain right now, and we don’t know how to deal with it.

2. Never try to talk us out of our emotions.

Trying to relieve us of our fear or sadness might seem like a good idea. And sometimes, it is. In fact, we might even ask you if we have any reason to be worried, so that we can try to combat that irrational part of us that is constantly afraid.

But there’s a fine line between trying to help us and trying to talk us out of it. Never tell us that our worries don’t exist, or that we can get over it if we just stop thinking about it. All that does is make us feel like we’re broken—that there’s something wrong with us that even our closest loved ones don’t understand.

3. Part of us knows that our fears aren’t rational, but we can’t shake the part that doesn’t.

Sure, we know that the embarrassing thing we said wasn’t really all that embarrassing, and it probably didn’t influence anyone’s opinions of us whatsoever, and that the entire group we were with today probably isn’t talking about how terrible we are behind our backs. We know how ridiculous that sounds, and it sounds even more ridiculous saying it out loud.

But that other part of us. . .that’s where anxiety lives. That’s where it can stay, feeding on us, popping out its head occasionally to remind us that it’s still there. That’s the part that always reminds us, “What if thistime, my worries are correct?”

4. We are grateful for what we have—and for you.

Often, anxious people are labeled as pessimists. And that’s actually quite understandable. We’re pretty talented at coming to the worst possible conclusion almost instantaneously.

But that’s not always who we are. In fact, many of us are pretty optimistic between anxiety bouts. We do love our life, and we are grateful for what we have, and we are especially grateful for you. We don’t mean to focus on the negative, but sometimes, we can’t help it. Know we always appreciate you. You are the light at the end of our tunnel. You are the one who tries your hardest to understand, who knows us in and out and still is willing to stay.

5. We know you can’t always see things from our perspective, but we appreciate you trying.

As someone who doesn’t suffer from anxiety, we know you won’t be able to fully understand. We know that we might sometimes sound crazy, and we’re sure it can be frustrating to have to drop everything and calm us down.

But every time you answer our fearful texts with reassurance and kindness, or pull us into another room to ask us what we’re worrying about, or are simply there, steady, supportive, without questioning the way we operate. . .we can’t even express how much that means, because it’s rare to find.

6. We wish we could turn it off, but we can’t.

Though it might seem otherwise, we don’t want to focus on what could go wrong. We don’t want to be negative, or bring the mood down, or nitpick about things that may seem little to an outsider. We’re not trying to get attention.

We know how we sound sometimes, and we wish we could turn it off. But it’s just a part of who we are.

7. It doesn’t define us.

We may have anxiety, and it may be a part of us. But so are our passions, our quirks, our personalities. Anxiety is one of countless parts. We still laugh. We still feel the wind in our hair. We still appreciate a steaming mug of coffee early in the morning, or the sun warming our skin in the summer.

We still love you. We always will.

Source: http://hellogiggles.com/7-things-people-anxiety-want-loved-ones-know/

Related Continuing Education Courses for Mental Health Professionals

Anxiety: Practical Management Techniques is a 4-hour online CE course. Nearly every client who walks through a health professional’s door is experiencing some form of anxiety. Even if they are not seeking treatment for a specific anxiety disorder, they are likely experiencing anxiety as a side effect of other clinical issues. For this reason, a solid knowledge of anxiety management skills should be a basic component of every therapist’s repertoire. Clinicians who can teach practical anxiety management techniques have tools that can be used in nearly all clinical settings and client diagnoses. Anxiety management benefits the clinician as well, helping to maintain energy, focus, and inner peace both during and between sessions. The purpose of this course is to offer a collection of ready-to-use anxiety management tools. Course #40-12 | 2007 | 41 pages | 30 posttest questions

Separation Anxiety in Children & Adolescents is a 6-hour online CE course. This CE test is based on the book “Separation Anxiety in Children & Adolescents” (2005, 298 pages). The book presents a research-based approach to understanding the challenges of separation anxiety and helping children, adolescents, and their parents build the skills they need to overcome it. The authors provide step-by-step guidelines for implementing the entire process of therapy-from intake and assessment through coping skills training, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and relapse prevention. Featuring in-depth case examples, the book is written for maximum accessibility for all clinicians, including those with limited cognitive-behavioral therapy experience, who treat separation anxiety and other childhood anxiety disorders. Useful reproducible handouts include the Separation Anxiety Assessment Scales, which facilitate individualized case formulation and treatment planning. Closeout Course #60-70 | 30 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) to offer home study continuing education for NCCs (#5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 
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Posted by on August 6, 2015 in Continuing Education, General

 

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Spend More Time Outside to Improve Your Mental Health

walking outside in natureA Stroll in Nature Improves Mental Health

We spend less time in natural settings, including parks.

Post published by Constance Scharff Ph.D. on Jul 31, 2015 in Ending Addiction for Good

Before I earned my graduate degrees and changed my career to focus on addiction treatment and recovery, I worked for the Girl Scouts. I absolutely loved my work, especially in my last years with the organization, during which among other things, I oversaw Girl Scout camp. As a girl, I regularly attended camps, begging my parents to let me go several times during the summer. I felt at my best in the forest. So it was no surprise to me that a new study out of Stanford University suggests that time spent in natural settings may improve brain health.

As more and more of us live in cities, we spend less time in natural settings, including parks. Studies also show that people in urban settings without access to green spaces have higher levels of psychological problems than those with access to green spaces. Is there a definitive connection between time spent in green spaces and mental health? The answer is yes. In a series of two studies, Stanford researchers believe there is a connection between time spent in green spaces and a decrease in “morbid rumination,” what is more commonly thought of as brooding over the negative aspects of our lives. While the study pool was small and more studies need to be done, there is no real downside to a walk in the park….

What does this mean for us?

Spend Time in Natural Settings – What can it hurt to take a daily walk in the park or spend time sitting on your back porch looking at the creek (if you’re lucky enough to have that situation)? Take your lunch to a natural setting and spend vacation time at least partially in the outdoors. Doing so will immediately improve your mental health.

Move – Movement is good for us. No doctor in the world says that it’s healthy to sit at home and do nothing. But instead of going to the gym, find a nature trail to hike or bike, golf, or take a stroll in the green belt. Even if you don’t get your heart rate up to aerobic activity levels, you’ll still mentally benefit from the movement.

Think About How You Live and Work – I was supremely unhappy in the place I found myself living for the last five years, an urban area with a lot of green space but with weather so hot and buggy most of the year that I could not regularly enjoy it. I made the decision to leave and put myself in a situation that was better for my physical and emotional health. While moving may not be an option available to everyone, we do have a lot of choices about our lifestyles. Living and working in a place that adds to your health is one choice we can make.
Original: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ending-addiction-good/201507/stroll-in-nature-improves-mental-health

Courses of Interest:

Depression is a 1-hour online CE course by the National Institute of Mental Health. Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression. This introductory course provides an overview to the various forms of depression, including signs and symptoms, co-existing conditions, causes, gender and age differences, and diagnosis and treatment options. Course #10-72 | 2014 | 14 pages | 10 posttest questions

Animal Assisted Therapy is a 2-hour online CE course by Lois Jean Brady, MA, CCC-SLP, CAS. In Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) the human-animal bond is utilized to help meet therapeutic goals and reach individuals who are otherwise difficult to engage in verbal therapies. AAT is considered an emerging therapy at this time, and more research is needed to determine the effects and confirm the benefits. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of research and case studies that illustrate the considerable therapeutic potential of using animals in therapy. AAT has been associated with improving outcomes in four areas: autism-spectrum symptoms, medical difficulties, behavioral challenges, and emotional well-being. This course is designed to provide therapists, educators, and caregivers with the information and techniques needed to begin using the human-animal bond successfully to meet individual therapeutic goals. This presentation will focus exclusively on Animal Assisted Therapy and will not include information on other similar or related therapy. Course #21-05 | 2015 | 36 pages | 16 posttest questions

Therapeutic Aspects of Running is a 1-hour online CE course by Dana Denissel, MOT. Physical inactivity is among the most critical public health concerns in America today. For healthcare professionals, the creation and implementation of sustainable fitness solutions is a relevant cause. This course will help you become familiar with the physical and psychological rewards involved in the activity of running, identify risks and the most common running injuries – along with their symptoms and most probable causes – and describe strategies that can be used in preventing running injuries and developing a healthy individualized running regimen. Course #10-70 | 2014 | 16 pages | 10 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM); by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); by the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); by the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2015 in General

 

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Dog Days of Summer Sale at PDResources – Save 30% Now

Dog Days of Summer Sale at PDResources – Save 30% Now

hot dog

Whether you’re staying cool by the pool or blasting the AC indoors, there’s no denying the dog days of summer are here! So why not get caught up (or a head start!) on your CE requirements?

To help, we are offering 30% Off ALL CE Courses during these sultry days of summer.

Click-Here-To-Shop-Now

Your 30% discount should automatically apply at checkout. But if for any reason it doesn’t, just enter coupon code DogDays2015 and click ‘update’ to apply.

me

Have a great week, and please let me know if I can help with anything. We’re always happy to lend a hand.

Your friend in CE,

Gina Ulery, MS, RDN, LDN
Director of Operations
Professional Development Resources

Sale effective Tuesday, August 3 through Monday, August 10, 2015.

Offer valid on future orders only.

PDR-Logo-1

Professional Development Resources allows you the flexibility to earn CEU credits at your own pace and according to your own schedule, wherever you are. You can explore courses, register, study, take exams and earn your accredited continuing education units all online. Over 100 online, video and book-based courses are available. Read what our customers are saying.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners. Professional Development Resources is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

Professional Development Resources, Inc. is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are located in Jacksonville, Florida. Federal Tax ID 59-3138625.

 
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Posted by on August 4, 2015 in General

 

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The Curious Link between Borderline Personality and Chronic Pain

Borderline Personality and PainBy Traci Stein, PhD, MPH, Complementary and Alternative Medicine

 

Borderline personality (BP) is estimated to affect between 1.5% and 6% of people in the United States. Core features of BP include black-and-white, all-or-nothing thinking, intense, rapidly shifting emotions and difficulties with emotion regulation, challenges in relationships and with self-image, and a tendency toward impulsivity.

All of these can exacerbate distress, decrease coping, and make it harder to function socially, at work, and in general. Furthermore, the prevalence of BP in people with chronic pain is significantly greater than in the general population (30%) and is linked to increased pain severity and poorer coping with pain.

Non-suicidal self-injury is a tool frequently used by those with borderline personality in an effort to decrease emotional pain and induce calm. Those who have BP often report both the absence of pain and an increase in well-being or feelings of euphoria when engaging in self-harm, both of which may reinforce the tendency to continue self-harming as a way of coping.

The Pain Paradox

The relationship between pain, self-injury, and BP is complex. Between 70% and 80% of those diagnosed with BP engage in self-injury to distance themselves from painful emotions and distressing thoughts. On the surface, it is perplexing that BP predisposes individuals to not only higher pain tolerance in the face of acute (short-duration) and self-inflicted pain, but lower pain tolerance, as well as greater pain severity and poorer coping, in response to chronic (ongoing) pain.

The Overlap of Emotional and Physical Pain

Contrary to popular belief, there is no one “pain center” in the brain; multiple brain structures are responsible for the experience of pain. A complex and multifaceted experience, “pain” refers to sensing the location of discomfort, assessing pain severity, registering the quality of pain (e.g., piercing, hot, throbbing, intermittent, etc.), linking to memories related to pain, the emotional response to pain, beliefs one has about the potential for coping with pain, and the ability to devise and follow through with a plan for pain management, among others.

The current and rapidly growing body of research on pain has found that distressing cognitive responses, such as catastrophizing (“I can’t handle this pain; I’m never going to get better!”) and emotional responses, such as depression and anxiety, can worsen both pain severity and coping, as well as challenge one’s ability to stick with a pain management plan that may require patience, persistence, and possibly a temporary increase in pain severity (such as with physical therapy).

Why Is Borderline Personality Common in People with Chronic Pain?

There is no definitive answer for why borderline personality would be so much more prevalent in people with chronic pain than in the general population. Because pain is a complex, mind-brain-body phenomenon, one hypothesis is that pain that feels random or beyond one’s control may induce feelings of depression, hopelessness, helplessness, anger, and anxiety—all of which amp up pain. Invalidation by ill-informed providers is more likely to elicit poor coping, particularly in those who may struggle with coping already.
Reports of increased severity of pain and other bodily symptoms in those with BP are correlated with greater levels of anxiety and depression. When researchers have statistically controlled for anxiety and depression in those who have both BP and pain, symptom severity has been similar to that of those without BP.

Read More: http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/borderline-personality-and-chronic-pain-the-curious-link-0727155

Related Courses of Interest: 

Living a Better Life with Chronic Pain: Eliminating Self-Defeating Behaviors is a 5-hour online CE course by Robert E. Hardy, EdD. Certainly no one would choose a pain-filled body over a healthy, pain-free body. Yet every day, people unwittingly choose actions and attitudes that contribute to pain or lead to other less-than-desirable consequences on their health, relationships or ability to function. These actions and attitudes are what are called self-defeating behaviors (SDBs) and they keep us from living life to the fullest—if we let them. This course is a self-instructional module that “walks” readers through the process of replacing their self-defeating chronic pain issues with healthy, positive, and productive life-style behaviors. It progresses from an analysis of the emotional aspects of living with chronic pain to specific strategies for dealing more productively with it. Through 16 guided exercises, readers will learn how to identify their self-defeating behaviors (SDBs), analyze and understand them, and then replace them with life-giving actions that lead to permanent behavioral change. Course #50-12 | 2014 | 49 pages | 35 posttest questions

Managing Chronic Pain in Adults With or in Recovery from Substance Use Disorders is a 5-hour online CE course by the US Department of Health and Human Services. Medication for chronic pain is addictive; therefore, the treatment of individuals with both substance abuse disorders and pain presents particular challenges. This course is based on a document from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Managing Chronic Pain in Adults With or in Recovery from Substances Use Disorders: A Treatment Improvement Protocol (SAMHSA Tip 54). Intended for all healthcare providers, this document explains the close connections between the neurobiology of pain and addiction, assessments for both pain and addiction, procedures for treatment of chronic pain management (both pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical), side effects and symptoms of tolerance and withdrawal from pain medication, managing risk of addiction to pain medication and nonadherence to treatment protocols, maintaining patient relationships, documentation, and safety issues. Written by panel consensus, SAMHSA TIP 54 provides a good introduction to pain management issues and also a good review for experienced clinicians. Course #50-06 | 2012 | 120 pages | 34 posttest questions

Assessing Substance Abuse in Patients with Chronic Pain is a 3-hour online CE course by Ellen Lavin, PhD. This course will demystify the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain, the role and limitations of pain medications, and how to identify when pain relieving drugs may be harmful to clients. Participants will understand how to conduct a complete evaluation of clients with a pain disorder, chronic pain syndrome and co-morbid psychiatric diagnoses. Although the majority of chronic pain patients do not abuse pain medications, mental health practitioners need skills to assess when active substance abuse is present and develop appropriate treatment objectives. This course will also give special attention to specific clinical challenges for mental health professionals who treat clients with chronic pain, including suicide assessment and treatment non-adherence. Closeout Course #30-35 | 2006 | 34 pages | 20 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) to offer home study continuing education for NCCs (#5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB #1046, ACE Program); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling (#BAP346) and Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 
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Posted by on July 29, 2015 in General

 

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