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Category Archives: Nutrition & Dietetics

6 Ways To Keep Your Mind Sharp As You Age

By Leslie Kernisan

Want to stay mentally sharp for as long as possible?

6 Ways To Keep Your Mind Sharp As You AgeMyths and Facts About Cognitive Aging:

Myth: Maintaining cognitive health means preserving your memory.
Fact: Cognitive health is far more than having a good memory. It also involves decision-making, attention and problem-solving.

Myth: Cognitive function always declines with age.
Fact: Aging can have positive and negative effects on cognition.

Myth: Brain neurons die as you age, so there is no way to prevent cognitive decline.
Fact: In the absence of disease, neuron death is minimal.

Myth: There is nothing you can do to improve your cognitive health.
Fact: There are actions individuals and families can take to help support their cognitive health and adapt to age-related cognitive changes.

6 Ways to Protect Your Brain as You Age:

In its full report, the IOM devotes 120 pages to reviewing the factors that affect cognitive aging, along with interventions that might improve brain health. It summarizes the most important suggestions for the public in its handy action guide, and I’ve paraphrased them below (the first three are the most important):

  1. Be physically active.
  2. Reduce your cardiovascular risk factors (including hypertension, diabetes and smoking).
  3. Manage your medications by reviewing them with a clinician and learning about their effects on cognitive health.
  4. Be socially and intellectually active.
  5. Get adequate sleep.
  6. Learn to prevent delirium, a decrease in cognitive function that can be triggered by hospitalization, medications or certain illnesses.

Risky Medications and Delirium Prevention

All six of these recommendations are important and useful. But two particularly caught my eye, because they are actions that we especially focus on in geriatrics: medication management and delirium prevention.

Now I hate to say this, but I think you should know the truth: We geriatricians focus on them in part because they are often overlooked by our doctor colleagues. Most clinicians are very busy and usually have not had special training in modifying healthcare to be a better fit for older adults.

The IOM’s “Action Guide for Health Care Providers” spells out what doctors should be doing in those areas. For instance, it mentions that the use of over-the-counter anticholinergics should be assessed. (This is a topic I covered recently in a Next Avenue blog post.)

We hope that many health providers read this IOM action guide and modify their work accordingly.

But here’s an insider tip from me to you: When you find out that expert organizations feel the need to remind doctors to do something, that’s a sign that doctors aren’t doing it reliably. Which means it is smart to be proactive and remind your doctors to help you.

Why Seniors Get Delirium

Delirium is an incredibly common and important health complication that affects seniors.

It’s basically a state of worse-than-usual mental function that can be brought on by some illness or stress on the body or mind. It is the reason older adults are often confused after surgery, but can also be the only outward sign of a potentially serious infection in someone living at home. Delirium is associated with all kinds of bad health outcomes, including longer hospital stays, health complications and even acceleration of cognitive decline. But you can help prevent it, or at least make sure it gets noticed and managed promptly.

The IOM reports that cognitive aging can affect an older adult’s ability to manage complex tasks such as driving and finances. It notes that victims of financial elder abuse lose billions every year. (My guess is that many of those victims are suffering from more than cognitive aging, but yes, this is a serious problem.)

Nutrition and Other Approaches for Brain Health

In preparing this report, the IOM conducted a comprehensive review of different approaches that have been studied in relation to cognitive health. So if you are wondering about a particular approach that’s not mentioned above, chances are it is covered in the full report.

The summary on the effect of various diets, including the Mediterranean diet, is here and the summary regarding vitamins, including antioxidants, starts here.

Basically, for now the IOM has concluded that some of the dietary approaches have promise but we need more research to confirm their effectiveness. The report also concludes that the medical literature doesn’t convincingly support vitamin supplementation to prevent cognitive decline.

If You or a Relative Has Alzheimer’s

Part of the purpose of the IOM report is to draw attention to cognitive aging as a health issue that is distinct from dementia and deserves its own attention from the public, practicing clinicians and researchers.

This is a reasonable position. That said, if you’re concerned about brain health for someone with a dementia diagnosis, you should know this: The cognitive aging recommendations listed above do improve the brain health of people with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia.

Why? Because the recommendations are basically about how you can optimize brain health and brain function; they apply whether a person has experienced brain aging or extra damage from a disease.

If we can all do better in helping people optimize their brain health and in compensating for any cognitive aging, our society will be a better place for aging Americans.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/13/myths-about-brain-health_n_7213754.html?ir=Healthy%20Living&ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

Related Online Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Professionals:

Biology of Aging: Research Today for a Healthier Tomorrow is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that introduces some key areas of research and looks ahead to the future, as today’s research provides the strongest hints of things to come.

Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: Intensifying the Research Effort is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that reviews basic mechanisms and risk factors of AD and details recent research findings.

Aging: The Unraveling Self is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines the biological, social, and psychological aspects of aging.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Florida Dietitian & Nutritionist License Renewal Information

As a Florida RDN who happens to work in CE, I get lots of questions this time of year about what we need to renew. So here’s a quick recap of our requirements, plus I’ve included a 20% off coupon to help with any remaining CE needs. :)

CE Required: 30 hours every 2 years, of which:
2 hours on Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition are required each renewal
3 hours on HIV/AIDS are required for your first renewal only
Up to 20 hours may be earned through online (home study) courses
License Renewal Deadline: May 31, 2015

10 of the 30 required hours must be “live.” You can take certain webinars to meet the live hours as long as they allow for interaction between you and the speaker.

Still need CE? You can save 20% on all online CE courses @ PDR (up to 20 hours allowed per renewal) and we report to CE Broker for you.

20% Off Florida RDN CEUs

Enter coupon code PDRPC208 at checkout to redeem.

Here are a few popular online CE courses:

  • Nutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders.
  • Nutrition Education for Diabetes Mellitus is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the rationale and goals for providing medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus.
  • Adult Obesity: Prevention and Treatment is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides Registered Dietitian/Nutritionists (RDNs) with evidence-based, non-biased information on the prevention and treatment of obesity in adults.

Please let me know if you have any other questions. I’m happy to help! And please feel free to share this information with friends and colleagues.

Your friend in CE,
Gina Ulery, MS, RDN, LD/N
Director of Operations & Marketing
Professional Development Resources

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the Florida Council of Dietetics and Nutrition (Provider #50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

 

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Children with ADHD at Higher Risk for Eating Disorder

Story from Medical News Today

A new study has suggested that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely than other children to also have loss of control eating syndrome – a condition similar to binge eating disorder. The finding suggests the two conditions may share a common biological mechanism.

child eatingThe research, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, could potentially lead to the development of treatment that works for both conditions.

Although many children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) lose weight when taking stimulant drugs to treat their condition, experts have found associations between ADHD and overweight and obesity.

Data have also linked ADHD with adult binge eating disorder. However, there are limited data in children with loss of control eating syndrome (LOC-ES) – a condition that shares many of the same diagnostic criteria as binge eating disorder and is typified by an inability to stop eating at certain times.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that, as of 2011, approximately 11% of children in the US aged 4-17 (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD. The common behavioral disorder is characterized by hyperactivity, impulsive behavior and difficulty sustaining attention.

Experts believe that the cause of excessive weight in some children with ADHD may be attributable to a connection between the impulsivity that typifies ADHD and a loss of control over food consumption.

For the study, Dr. Shauna Reinblatt, assistant professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and colleagues assessed 79 children aged 8-14 to see whether such a connection exists.

Each participating child was assessed with a number of tests, interviews and parental reports in order to diagnose or discount ADHD and LOC-ES. Neuropsychological tests were also conducted to measure how well the participants were able to control their impulses.

Read more: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/293236.php

Related Online Continuing Education Courses:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that gives a brief update on the various facets of ADHD. It details the core symptoms, including behavioral manifestations of each, notes what is known about its causes, and lists the components of a comprehensive diagnostic protocol. It also describes a multifaceted treatment approach that includes combined medication, psychotherapy, and behavioral therapy. The course includes sections on comorbid disorders, dealing with ADHD at school, and treating it in teens and adults. Course #10-65 | 2012 | 24 pages | 10 posttest questions

The Impact of a Life of ADHD: Understanding for Clinicians and Clients is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses the many ways a lifetime of ADHD can affect a person’s life. This is important information for all clinicians working with adults who have ADHD, partly for their own understanding, but also to help clients understand their own ADHD. It will include descriptions of situations that can obscure ADHD and will highlight the executive, academic, occupational, psychological, and social aspects of adult functioning that are impacted by ADHD. The second section involves educating clients about the many ways that ADHD has affected their life trajectories. This goes beyond the obvious academic difficulties and includes current functioning as well, offering less pejorative explanations for their weaknesses. Included are techniques for involving family members, creating an ADHD-friendly lifestyle, and finding a better fit in the classroom and the workplace. This education is a crucial first step in the treatment of ADHD in adults and builds the foundation for medication, coaching, and therapy. Closeout Course #30-48 | 2009 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions

Nutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders. Effective treatment of eating disorders requires multidimensional and individualized interventions. Education that addresses the normal nutritional needs and the physiologic effects of starvation and refeeding is a critical component of treatment. Management often requires long-term nutritional counseling of the patient which may extend several years. This course will describe the rationale and use of providing Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) for the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and Binge Eating Disorder. Included are: Criteria for Diagnosing Eating Disorders; Role of Dieting in the Development of Eating Disorders; Symptomology; Treatment Overview; Nutrition Therapy; Reconnecting with Hunger and Satiety; Use of Exercise; Working with a Therapist; Pharmacotherapy; In-Patient versus Out-Patient Treatment; Refeeding; Establishing a Dietary/Eating Pattern; Comparing Traditional and Health at Every Size (HAES) Approaches to Health Enhancement; Recovery from Eating Disorders; Nutrition Care Process; and the Core Minimum Guide. Course #30-80 | 2015 | 24 pages | 21 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Girls with Type 1 Diabetes at High Risk for Eating Disorders

By age 25 years, cumulative probability of onset of eating disorder is 60 percent.

Eating disorders common is girls with Type 1 diabetesFor girls and young women with type 1 diabetes, eating disorders are common and persistent, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care.

Patricia A. Colton, M.D., from the University Health Network in Toronto, and colleagues describe the longitudinal course of disturbed eating behavior (DEB) and eating disorders in 126 girls with type 1 diabetes. The girls participated in a series of seven interview-based assessments of eating disorder behavior and psychopathology over a 14-year period.

The researchers found that the mean age was 11.8 and 23.7 years at time 1 and time 7, respectively. At time 7, 32.4 and 8.5 percent of participants met the criteria for a current eating disorder and had a subthreshold eating disorder, respectively. The mean age at eating disorder onset was 22.6 years, and by age 25 years the cumulative probability of onset was 60 percent. There was an average of 4.3 years between onset of eating disorder and subsequent eating disorder remission; by six years after onset, the cumulative probability of remission was 79 percent. There was an average of 6.5 years between remission of eating disorder and subsequent recurrence; by six years after remission, the cumulative probability of recurrence was 53 percent.

“Future research should focus on the development and testing of strategies for the prevention and treatment of DEB and eating disorders in this high-risk group,” the authors write.

Source: http://www.physiciansbriefing.com/Article.asp?AID=698620

Related Online Continuing Education (CE/CEU) Courses:

Nutrition for Eating DisordersNutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders. Effective treatment of eating disorders requires multidimensional and individualized interventions. Education that addresses the normal nutritional needs and the physiologic effects of starvation and refeeding is a critical component of treatment. Management often requires long-term nutritional counseling of the patient which may extend several years. This course will describe the rationale and use of providing Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) for the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and Binge Eating Disorder. Included are: Criteria for Diagnosing Eating Disorders; Role of Dieting in the Development of Eating Disorders; Symptomology; Treatment Overview; Nutrition Therapy; Reconnecting with Hunger and Satiety; Use of Exercise; Working with a Therapist; Pharmacotherapy; In-Patient versus Out-Patient Treatment; Refeeding; Establishing a Dietary/Eating Pattern; Comparing Traditional and Health at Every Size (HAES) Approaches to Health Enhancement; Recovery from Eating Disorders; Nutrition Care Process; and the Core Minimum Guide. Course #30-80 | 2015 | 24 pages | 21 posttest questions

Nutrition Education for Diabetes MellitusNutrition Education for Diabetes Mellitus is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the rationale and goals for providing medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how the body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to health because it’s an important source of energy for the cells that make up the muscles and tissues. It’s also the brain’s main source of fuel. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. This course describes the rationale and goals for providing medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus. Included are: recommendations for specific nutrient modifications; nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring and evaluation; exercise and stress; gastropathy; enteral nutrition; testing and classifications; medications and insulin; blood glucose meters; and methods of meal planning. Nutrition education tools and handouts are provided to assist the dietitian in counseling clients. Course #21-08 | 2015 |  26 pages | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the Florida Council of Dietetics and Nutrition (#50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2015 in Nutrition & Dietetics

 

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Gestational Diabetes Linked To Autism Risk

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Gestational Diabetes Linked To Autism Risk

Gestational Diabetes Linked To Autism Risk

A new study of more than 320,000 babies links autism to gestational diabetes.

The longitudinal study, conducted between 1995 and 2009 by researchers at Kaiser Permanente Southern California, found that children born to mothers who developed gestational diabetes before 26 weeks of pregnancy were at a 63 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. But after controlling for maternal age, education, ethnicity, household income, the child’s sex and the mother’s pre-existing conditions, that risk dropped to 42 percent.

While the overall rate of autism among study participants was 1 in 100 (mirroring national averages during the period of study), the rate of autism among children born to mothers with early pregnancy diabetes was 1 in 80.

Because this is a longitudinal association study, researchers were not able to establish a cause for the autism diagnosis. However, the associations were strong enough to warrant at least two health applications for expectant parents, according to study co-author Dr. Edward Curry.

For one, the study’s results emphasize the importance of early prenatal care. The women whose children were most at risk for developing autism were not women with previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes (who were already managing the condition with insulin, medication and diet). Nor were they women who got gestational diabetes after 26 weeks. Instead, the link between early gestational diabetes and an increased likelihood of autism diagnosis could mean that a fetus’ early exposure to uncontrolled high blood sugar may somehow affect brain development.

“We want to get mothers in early to make sure they’re on their vitamins, folic acid and that they check blood sugar to make sure it’s under control early on,” said Curry. “I think that’s the real takeaway message from this study.”

The second application, according to Curry, is for moms who know they were diagnosed with gestational diabetes before 26 weeks. These moms should remain extra vigilant about their baby’s developmental milestones. Are they making eye contact, babbling and pointing? Parents should also tell their child’s pediatrician about the gestational diabetes diagnosis, and ensure that pediatricians screen for autism appropriately at 12, 18 or 24 months old.

“We as pediatricians are supposed to be screening [by at least] 18 and 24 months, but it never hurts for the parents to have increased vigilance,” explained Curry. He also emphasized that his finding needs to be confirmed with more studies, as well as a few that can find out the causal link between gestational diabetes and autism, if there is one.

Dr. Annette Estes, the director of the University of Washington Autism Center, was not involved in Curry’s research but praised it for the large sample size, the length of time covered and the fact that the analysis controlled for multiple factors beyond gestational diabetes. The next step, said Estes, would be to do a prospective study, which looks forward in time by following pregnant moms, collecting data along their fetus’ growth and the child’s development. And, of course, the ultimate goal would be to figure out why there’s such a strong association between early gestational diabetes and the risk of autism diagnosis in children.

While scientists don’t know what exactly causes autism spectrum disorder, research to date suggests that a mix of genetic and environmental factors are at play. It’s known that autism tends to run in families and that having one child with autism increases the risk of subsequent siblings being diagnosed with the condition as well. Autism has also been linked in past studies to factors like air pollution, maternal obesity, periods of prenatal oxygen deprivation, exposure to pesticides and advanced parental age, according to the National Institutes of Health. The amount of preliminary research that’s out there right now can be confusing for parents and lay readers, explained Estes.

“The main factor that we are all in agreement is that genetics plays a major role in autism, but it doesn’t account for everything,” said Estes. “Once we get the genetics of autism a little more clear, then we can understand more about other risk factors; There’s going to be a number of risk factors, as we can see.”

“I think at this point, what parents can take away is that [autism research] is a science that’s in process,” she concluded.

Autism is a lifelong disorder that is characterized by lack of eye contact, communication delays, difficulty forming relationships and a preoccupation with niche subjects or objects. Other behaviors typical in people with autism include rocking one’s body, banging one’s head against a hard surface and flapping one’s hands, although the severity of the condition can vary from person to person, ranging from mild impairment to severe disability.

Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that currently, 1 in 68 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, and that the condition is about five times more common in boys.

Curry’s study was published online April 14 in JAMA.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/16/gestational-diabetes-autism_n_7073578.html?ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

Related Online Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Professionals:

Autism: The New Spectrum of Diagnostics, Treatment & Nutrition is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes DSM-5 diagnostic changes, assessment, intervention models, dietary modifications, nutrition considerations and other theoretical interventions.

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence-Based Screening and Assessment is a 3-hour online CEU course that identifies DSM-5 diagnostic changes in the ASD diagnostic criteria, summarizes the empirically-based screening and assessment methodology in ASD and describes a comprehensive developmental approach for assessing students with ASD.

See more @ https://www.pdresources.org/searchlisting?search_input=autism&search_title=1

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Florida Dietitians and Nutritionists Continuing Education and License Renewals

By Gina Ulery, MS, RD, LD/N

Save on CE!

Florida-licensed dietitians and nutritionists are required to earn 30 hours of continuing education credits during each 2-year licensing cycle in order to renew by May 31st of odd-numbered years. Of the 30 hours:

  • 2 hours on Preventing Medical Errors are required each renewal
  • 3 hours on HIV/AIDS are required for the first renewal only
  • Up to 20 hours may be earned through online (home study) courses
  • No more than 10 hours may be earned in risk management, personal growth, management and educational techniques per biennium
  • All continuing education hours must be reported to CE Broker in order to renew.


Florida RDNs can save 20% on all CE courses @ www.pdresources.org (up to 20 hours allowed per renewal).
Discount will automatically apply at checkout (for Florida Nutrition/Dietetics professionals). Coupon code: PDRPC208

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the FloridaCouncil of Dietetics and Nutrition (Provider #50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

Original: Florida RDN License Renewal and CE Info

 

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St. Patrick’s Day Continuing Education Sale

Enjoy a pint of green beer and 25% off ALL CE courses now thru Tuesday in our 4th annual St. Paddy’s CElebration! (Beer not included :))

St. Paddy's CE Sale

Use coupon code STP2015 at checkout if discount does not automatically apply. Coupon valid on future orders only. Hurry, sale ends @ midnight on 3/17/2015.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

Original: St. Patricks Day CE Sale 

 

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