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How Does Cyberbullying Affect the Lives of Young People?

cyberbullyingIn our technologically advanced society, not all bullying is physical. Start a discussion about cyberbullying and how young people can protect themselves and their friends

By Beth Cassidy

In the past, bullying occurred in places such as the school playground.

But these days, some young people fall victim to a more sinister type of abuse: cyberbullying.

Using different types of technology, young people can now be subjected to a world of virtual taunting and harassment.

To help protect young people, the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre has asked social networking site Facebook to install a panic button on every page of its site which would allow users to report abuse immediately.

Start a discussion with young people about cyberbullying. Are young people aware of what it is? Discuss what it might involve. Cyberbullying is defined as a young person bullying another young person using technology such as text messages, social networking sites, chat rooms or emails. Writing nasty comments about someone on their Facebook page, sending threatening or Cybermentors offer support to victims of bullying abusive texts and writing intimidating emails are all forms of cyberbullying. Some cyberbullies have even created online hate groups about a young person and invited their peers to join.

Have young people ever been victims of cyberbullying? How did they feel? Did they talk to anyone about it? Cyberbullying is particularly nasty because the bullies can get to their victim without even being in the same room, making it more difficult to escape or track down the culprits. Discuss why teenagers being cyberbullied may feel worried about going to school. How might they feel? Paranoid? Anxious? Suicidal?

Discuss what measures young people can take to protect themselves from cyberbullying. Do young people think a panic button on sites such as Facebook is a good idea? Will it make young people feel more secure online? Talk about whether cyberbullying should be discussed in school lessons. Do young people think more awareness would help stamp out cyberbullying? What would young people do if they experienced cyberbullying? How would they advise a friend who was being bullied online?

As with any type of bullying, it’s important that young people tell someone they trust Cyberbullying is serious. Young people can do their bit by keeping an eye on friends and talking to them if they see any signs of cyberbullying. Confidential website services such as Beatbullying’s CyberMentors give young people the opportunity to talk to someone their own age, rather than an adult. Consider how this could empower young people to speak out about bullying.

Source: Cassidy, B. (2010, April 27). How does cyberbullying affect the lives of young people? Children & Young People Now, 22.

Cyberbullying prevention

Related Online Continuing Education Courses: 

Bullying Prevention: Raising Strong Kids by Responding to Hurtful & Harmful Behavior is a 3-hour online CE course. This video course starts with a thoughtful definition of “bullying” and goes on to illustrate the functional roles of the three participant groups: the targeted individuals, the bullies, and the bystanders. The speaker discusses the concepts of resiliency, empathy, and growth/fixed mindsets, and considers the pros and cons of alternative responses to harmful behavior. Included also are an examination of the utility of zero tolerance policies and a variety of adult responses when becoming aware of bullying behavior. The speaker utilizes multiple examples and scenarios to propose strategies and techniques intended to offer connection, support and reframing to targeted individuals, motivation to change in the form of progressive, escalating consequences to bullies, and multiple intervention options to bystanders. Further segments discuss ways in which schools can create safe, pro-social climates.

Electronic Media and Youth Violence is a 1-hour online CE course. This course, based on the publication Electronic Media and Youth Violence: A CDC Issue Brief for Educators and Caregivers from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, focuses on the phenomena of electronic aggression. Electronic aggression is defined as any kind of harassment or bullying that occurs through email, chat rooms, instant messaging, websites, blogs, or text messaging. The brief summarizes what is known about young people and electronic aggression, provides strategies for addressing the issue with young people, and discusses the implications for school staff, mental health professionals, parents and caregivers.

Building Resilience in your Young Client is a 3-hour online CE course. It has long been observed that there are certain children who experience better outcomes than others who are subjected to similar adversities, and a significant amount of literature has been devoted to the question of why this disparity exists. Research has largely focused on what has been termed “resilience.” Health professionals are treating an increasing number of children who have difficulty coping with 21st century everyday life. Issues that are hard to deal with include excessive pressure to succeed in school, bullying, divorce, or even abuse at home. This course provides a working definition of resilience and descriptions of the characteristics that may be associated with better outcomes for children who confront adversity in their lives. It also identifies particular groups of children – most notably those with developmental challenges and learning disabilities – who are most likely to benefit from resilience training. The bulk of the course – presented in two sections – offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2015 in General

 

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How to Become More Resilient

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Bouncing Back: Resilience Can Be LearnedWe’ve all had the experience of a dark moment in our lives. Times where the sun didn’t shine, the rain fell in sheets along with our tears, and we wondered how we could possibly bounce back from it all. Yet, we do bounce back and move on — some of us more easily than others.

Good news! You can learn to be more resilient.

I was invited to a fundraiser for women in mental health last month. The speaker was a well-respected psychiatrist of 20 years and associate chief of psychiatry for our local mental health facility. She gave a moving talk on resilience, highlighting all of the scientific research behind it, and I did an inner happy dance for the confirmation it gave me that I have been on the right track for the last few years as I spoke about resilience. Dr. Alison Freeland covered three of my four essential components to strengthening our bounce-back muscles (my fourth being rooted in greater purpose or spirituality), but most importantly she suggested that indeed resilience can be nurtured and enhanced.

Why is resilience so important to me — a woman on a crusade to empower others into self-care? Because resilience is a state of being at choice, and being at choice means you have the power to direct your life as you see fit. Any time a woman is in the perspective of being a victim of her circumstances and is paralyzed by a diagnosis, or a toxic relationship or a dead end job, she is essentially giving up her power. By increasing our resilience, we can all become stronger to make the difficult choices and orchestrate the lives we want and love.

Practice these daily and watch your resilience blossom:

Mindfulness
Mindfulness is not just a buzzword to be bounced around, there’s actually a large body of science that supports its benefits. Mindfulness also doesn’t necessarily mean you need to incorporate a daily morning and evening hour-long meditation into your already over-scheduled life. Small things like taking a deep breath every time you swipe your smart phone to unlock it, or taking a moment to feel the water temperature and soap texture or smell the scent of the soap as you wash your hands, those are mindfulness moments. Being in the present moment is a mental workout so get in a good three sets of 10 reps throughout the day. And by all means, learn to meditate if you can fit that in too.

Healthy Body Habits
According to the World Health Organization a healthy dose of exercise is considered 150 minutes weekly of moderate intensity, which is slightly elevated heart rate that also makes you a bit short of breath. This is really not a lot of walking, running, biking or dancing. (Note this is not the amount of exercise required for weight loss. We’d do ourselves a huge favor to separate exercise for health and exercise for weight loss in our minds.) As for nutrition, in my opinion, if you are focused on getting the fiber intake recommended by the Institute of Medicine (Women need 25 grams of fiber per day, and men need 38 grams per day) you would be hard pressed to be short on any other macro or micro nutrient required for health, and you’d probably crowd out all the junk food from your diet as well.

Reach-out to Your Community
Community support is what human beings thrive on. We are meant to live in tribes, families, and groups with common interest. When we are in our states of despair we often isolate ourselves, which in turn just makes matters worse. Find a trusted few you feel comfortable being vulnerable with and have them be your allies in times of need. Quiet the voice in your head that shames you for needing help, and reach-out.

Do for Others
The quickest way out of a funk is to realize that someone somewhere has it worse than you. Something as simple as writing a note to a person in need, or as complex as volunteering or starting a non-profit, can empower us all. For some people, but not all, this greater purpose and fulfillment is also found in a spiritual practice and a sense of unity with humanity on an energetic or vibrational level. It is important thought that when you are doing for others that it’s from a place of genuine love and caring and not from a place of guilt or obligation. Resentment doesn’t build resilience, but feeling fulfilled and having a sense of purpose does.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tammy-plunkett/bouncing-back-resilience-can-be-learned_b_7342158.html?ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

Related Online Continuing Education Courses:

Mindfulness: The Healing Power of Compassionate Presence is a 6-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides you with an excellent understanding of exactly what mindfulness is, why it works, and how to use it.

Building Resilience in your Young Client is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings.

These online courses provide instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. You can print the test (download test from My Courses tab of your account after purchasing) to mark your answers on it while reading the course document. Then submit online when ready to receive credit.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Continuing Education for School Psychologists

School Psychologists

Click to view CE for School Psychologists

School psychologists work with students in early childhood and elementary and secondary schools. They collaborate with teachers, parents, and school personnel to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments for all students. School psychologists address students’ learning and behavioral problems, suggest improvements to classroom management strategies or parenting techniques, and evaluate students with disabilities and gifted and talented students to help determine the best way to educate them.

They improve teaching, learning, and socialization strategies based on their understanding of the psychology of learning environments. They also may evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs, prevention programs, behavior management procedures, and other services provided in the school setting.

School Psychologists are required to earn continuing education credits to maintain licensure and to stay up-to-date on best practices. State School Psychology CE Requirements

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists and school psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (#50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

Click here to view online CE courses for school psychologists.

Popular course topics for school psychologists include:

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