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Tag Archives: CEU

Introduction to Transgender Issues

transgenderTransgender and gender-variant people have a variety of concerns for which they may seek the assistance of psychologists. In addition to the usual problems that may bring any individual to therapy, transgender and gender-variant people often seek professional help in understanding their gender identities and patterns of gender expression and in addressing the complex social and relational issues that are affected by these. Transgender persons not uncommonly seek medical services to make their bodies more congruent with their gender identities; involvement of mental health professionals is often necessary or desirable in arranging such services. Moreover, many transgender and gender-variant people experience stigmatization and discrimination as a result of living in a gendered culture into which they often do not easily fit. They may not only experience an inner sense of not belonging but also discrimination, harassment, sometimes lethal violence, and denial of basic human rights. These issues, too, often bring transgender people into contact with mental health professionals.

In recent years, transgender people have increasingly been willing to identify themselves openly (such as Bruce Jenner). Public awareness of transgender issues has increased dramatically, in part because of an increasing number of books, motion pictures, and television programs featuring transgender characters and addressing transgender issues. As a result, not only transgender people themselves but also their families and friends, employers, schools, and government agencies are increasingly turning to psychologists for help in addressing these issues on individual and community levels. At the same time, changes in service delivery systems related to transgender issues have resulted in transsexuals and other people with gender identity concerns more frequently turning to community mental health professionals for assessment and treatment. Consequently, it has become increasingly likely that psychologists will encounter people needing assistance with gender identity concerns. This trend underscores the need for psychologists to acquire greater knowledge and competence in addressing transgender issues.

The concerns of transgender and gender-variant persons are inextricably tied to issues of social justice, which have historically been important to APA. The stigmatization and discrimination experienced by transgender people affect virtually all aspects of their lives, including physical safety, psychological well-being, access to services, and basic human rights. This report highlights opportunities for APA to advance social justice as well as to support competent and ethical practice by promoting research, education, and professional development concerning transgender issues among psychologists, by creating a welcoming environment for transgender psychologists and students of psychology, and by supporting the human rights of all transgender citizens.

The most frequently cited estimate is that 700,000 people in the United States, or about 0.2 to 0.3 percent of the population, are transgender, though some experts say the true number is probably greater than that. However, there aren’t reliable statistics on this, because neither the U.S. Census Bureau nor the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ask people in national surveys whether they identify themselves as being a gender different from the one indicated by their physical features at birth.

Related Online Continuing Education Courses:

Gender Identity and Gender Variance is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that presents basic facts about homosexuality, transgendered individuals, and gender identity.

GLB Issues in Psychotherapy is a 6-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that examines psychotherapy with gay, lesbian, and bisexual individuals.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Animal Assisted Therapy Improves Medical, Behavioral and Emotional Health

By Lois Jean Brady, MA, CCC-SLP, CAS

What is Animal Assisted Therapy?

Animal Assisted TherapyAnimal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) practitioners blend guided therapeutic interventions with safe and highly motivating animal-human interactions that are designed to focus and share attention. AAT’s ability to capture and maintain an individual’s focus can encourage and expand joint attention, which, according to Prizant (2008), is a pivotal skill or a fundamental building block that influences the development of emotional regulation, social skills, and communication.

By maintaining interest and attention, AAT works to support language and motor activities, encourage social interaction, provide sensory integration, and motivate students to do their best. This philosophy of engaging an individual’s interest often yields beneficial results for children and adults with special needs. According to noted researcher Barry Prizant, PhD, CCC-SLP (2008), “The most effective approaches [for Autism Spectrum Disorders] infuse developmental, child-centered, and family-centered principles in educational programming for children with ASD.”

“One of the most fundamental advantages of animal-assisted therapy over other therapeutic modalities is that it provides the patient a much-needed opportunity to give affection as well as receive it. It is this reciprocity, rare among medical therapies, that makes AAT a unique and valuable route to healing.” – Dr. Andrew Weil (2011), world-renowned leader and pioneer in the field of integrative medicine.

A Brief History

Although the term Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) is relatively new, the use of animals to help people overcome illness and/or mental disorders is not a new idea. The earliest use of pet animals for therapeutic use was in Belgium in the middle ages, where pets and people were rehabilitated together, with pets providing a part of the natural therapy for the humans. Following this practice, The York Retreat in Germany and Bethel for the mentally ill and the homeless included animals, as a part of the therapeutic milieu reaping the benefits. Later, the Human Animal Bond was conceptualized by a Psychologist, Boris Levinson and Konrad Lorenz, an Austrian Nobel laureate in Physiology. This bond is explained as an intrinsic need in humans to bond with nature, especially in the background of their chaotic lives. The modern movement of using companion animals as a means of therapy had a multidisciplinary origin, involving the fields of veterinary medicine, psychology, sociology, psychiatry funded by pet food industry.

There are references to the fact that the early Greeks used horses to lift severely ill people’s spirits. In the 17th century, physicians reportedly began using horses as treatments to improve both physical and mental health issues in their patients. In the 1940s, the American Red Cross and the Army Air Corps established a farm where recuperating veterans could interact with and take care of animals while they were healing from war injuries and illness. Working with the animals was thought to comfort the recovering veterans, help them forget about the war, and focus on recovery.

How Can I Learn More?

Animal Assisted TherapyLois Jean Brady, MA, CCC-SLP, CAS, developed a 2-hour online continuing education course to provide therapists, educators, and caregivers with the information and techniques needed to begin using the human-animal bond successfully to meet individual therapeutic goals. The online course, Animal Assisted Therapy, is accredited for psychologists, counselors, social workers, marriage and family therapists, occupational therapists and speech-language pathologists. Click here to learn more.

Lois Jean Brady, MA, CCC-SLP, CAS, is passionate about working with the special needs community. She found her calling while in high school, when she spent her summer breaks volunteering in camp programs for children with special needs. Lois has over two decades of experience working as a Speech-Language Pathologist specializing in autism spectrum disorder and is a Certified Autism Specialist. Educational accomplishments include a Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology, Certificate in Assistive Technology, Certificate in Computer Based Intervention and completion of an Animal Assisted Therapy Program.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Important Notice About NBCOT Professional Development Units

For NBCOT PDU ID#8, certificants who have successfully completed education (workshops, seminars, lectures, online courses, or conferences) with an assessment component at the end of the program (scored test, project, paper) provided by AOTA, AOTA Approved Providers, IACET authorized providers, or regionally accredited colleges or universities can convert 0.1 CEU to a 1.25 NBCOT PDU. To learn more, go to www.nbcot.org, and click on the “Certification Review” tab at the top and then “PDU Calculator.”

NBCOT PDU Conversion Calculator

 
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Posted by on January 19, 2012 in General

 

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Multicultural Issues in Counseling – Psychological Treatment of Ethnic Minorities – New 2-Hour Web-Based Online Course

Multicultural Issues in Counseling - Psychological Treatment of Ethnic MinoritiesCourse Abstract: Multicultural Issues in Counseling – Psychological Treatment of Ethnic Minorities is based on thorough reviews of the research literature. The document provides specific cultural information about African-American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and multiracial populations, as well as recommendations for treatment related to each group. This course is appropriate for any mental health professional who would like to learn more about diversity and multicultural counseling. Course #20-56 | 2011 | 15 posttest questions | 4 page course download includes instructions, links to online materials and posttest questions

CE Credit: 2 Hours (0.2 CEUs)
Target Audience: Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, Occupational Therapists, Marriage & Family Therapists
Learning Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

1. Define cultural competence in the treatment of ethnic minority populations
2. List recommendations for the treatment of Asian American/Pacific Islander populations
3. List recommendations for the treatment of African descent populations
4. List recommendations for the treatment of Hispanic/Latino populations
5. List recommendations for the treatment of American Indian populations

 

About the Author(s):

The American Psychological Association (APA), located in Washington, D.C., is a professional organization with more than 150,000 members, including researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students. All the documents on which this course is based were compiled and written by members of the American Psychological Association. Full lists of authors are available in the documents.

 

Accreditation Statement:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)
 
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Posted by on February 15, 2011 in General

 

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Behavioral Health Care Needs of Rural Women – New 1-Hour Web-Based Online CE Course

Behavioral Health Care Needs of Rural WomenCourse Abstract:

This is a web-based course requiring an internet connection to access the required online reading materials. Course instructions provide a direct link to the public-access online document. This report attempts to direct attention to this underrepresented group and presents a review of the literature related to the behavioral health care needs of rural women. With this knowledge, psychologists and other health professionals will be able to more effectively plan and deliver services to this population. Additional goals for this report include identifying those questions, which still remain unanswered, and providing recommendations for future research, action, and advocacy related to addressing the needs of this underserved population. Course #10-40 | 2011 | 7 posttest questions | 3 page course download includes instructions, link to online document, and posttest questions

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify demographic issues that place rural women at risk for various psychological disorders
  2. List psychological disorders and other chronic illnesses commonly identified in rural women
  3. Identify special populations of rural women in need of psychological treatments
  4. List barriers to treatment, including cultural, fiscal, and attitudinal considerations
  5. Identify recommended strategies for psychologists in rural communities

About the Author(s):

The American Psychological Association (APA), located in Washington, D.C., is a professional organization with more than 150,000 members, including researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students. All of the documents on which this course is based were compiled and written by members of the American Psychological Association. Full lists of authors are available in the documents.

Accreditation Statement:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)

 

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2011 in General

 

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New 3-Hour Web-Based Course: Alzheimer’s – Unraveling the Mystery

Alzheimer's - Unraveling the Mystery - New 3-hour online continuing education courseOne person out of eight will get Alzheimer’s by the age of 65 – and nearly half by the age of 85. Such shocking statistics drive the need to know all we can about Alzheimer’s, so we can better help our patients, their families, and ours.

Alzheimer’s dementia is a growing concern among the aging Baby Boomers; yet, modern science points the way to reducing the risks through maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

This new continuing education course, Alzheimer’s – Unraveling the Mystery, is based on a publication from the National Institute on Aging, which describes healthy brain functioning during the aging process and then contrasts it to the processes of Alzheimer’s disease.

Full of colorful, detailed diagrams, this educational booklet describes the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, effective steps for prevention, strategies for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease, and the search for new treatments. Strategies for caregivers and reducing caregiver stress are also discussed briefly.

Course #30-54 | 2011 | 21 posttest questions | 5 page course download includes instructions, link to online document and posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Learning Level: Introductory

Cost: $24.30 (includes 10% off coupon on right)

Learn More & Order Now!

 
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Posted by on January 26, 2011 in General

 

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Emotional Overeating – New 4-Hour Online CE Course

Emotional Overeating - 4 Hour CE CourseWith the current flux of diet resolutions and obesity issues, we are pleased to introduce our newest online CE course, Emotional Overeating: Practical Management Techniques.

Statistics report that Americans are an increasingly overweight population. Among the factors contributing to our struggle to stop tipping the scales is the component of “emotional eating” – or the use of food to attempt to fill emotional needs.

Professionals in both the physical and emotional health fields encounter patients with emotional eating problems on a regular basis. Even clients who do not bring this as their presenting problem often have it on their list of unhealthy behaviors that contribute to or are intertwined with their priority concerns.

While not an easy task, it is possible to learn methods for dismantling emotional eating habits. The goals of this course are to present information about the causes of emotional eating, and provide a body of cognitive and behavioral exercises that can help to eliminate the addictive pattern. Course #40-26 | 2011 | 44 pages | 30 posttest questions

CE Credit: 4 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate
Cost: $56 (includes online course materials & CE test)

Learn More & Order Now!

 
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Posted by on January 12, 2011 in General

 

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