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Mental Health Month: Get Connected

Mental Health America first celebrated Mental Health Month in May 1949 to “raise awareness of mental health conditions and mental wellness for all.” Since then, a strong focus on mental health advocacy, awareness, and education in May is tradition.

To keep with tradition, Professional Development Resources is offering 25% off the following online mental health continuing education courses during May:

Visit www.pdresources.org for more details.

This year, Mental Health America is addressing these important issues through two themes:

Do More for 1 in 4 is a call to action to help the 1 in 4 American adults who live with a diagnosable, treatable mental health condition and the fact that they can go on to live full and productive lives. Download the Do More For 1in4 Toolkit.

The second theme, Healing Trauma’s Invisible Wounds, focuses on the impact of traumatic events on individuals and communities.  It centers around asking the person-based question: “What happened to you?” Download the Healing Trauma’s Invisible Wounds Toolkit.

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2012 in General

 

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Helping Children Thrive with LD/ADHD

By Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD

Helping Children Thrive with LD/ADHDAccording to the U.S. Department of Education, almost 1 million children have some form of learning disability for which they receive special educationParents report that over 5.4 million children have been diagnosed with ADHD, a figure that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) claims are continuing to increase annually. Millions more have varying diagnoses that affect learning and life success, including autism spectrum disorders.

For those of us who have parented children with learning disabilities, ADHD, and associated mental health issues, these figures not only represent challenges for our educational and health systems, they are deeply personal matters that affect the core of our families and our children’s happiness.

Beyond the logistics of educational assessments, tutoring, and daily homework challenges lies the responsibility of all adults—parents, teachers, and counselors—to foster a positive mindset that helps kids overcome the many obstacles they face.

Like millions of other students, my daughter’s story is unique. Among her many hurdles was learning to compensate for a reading speed in the lowest one percentile, a challenge that continues today as a 29-year-old.

But with acceptance and encouragement, children and young adults are surprisingly resilient and learn to embrace their differences. Recently, my daughter wrote about five ideas that fueled her success from middle school through law school as a student with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorder. She presented these ideas as part of an article, To Parents & Educators: From an Attorney with LD/ADHD and gave me permission to reprint them here.

Needless to say, I am very proud of how my daughter developed a path to accomplish goals she set for herself. But more importantly, what she outlines below as critical steps in her journey to understand and embrace her differences supports much of the research on positive youth development. All children must learn to overcome obstacles in order to believe in themselves!

In her own words, here are the five steps that were critical to my daughter’s success, ideas she now tries to instill in other young people.

Understand your Disabilities

Every student has strengths and weaknesses. But kids with diagnosed disabilities need to understand their academic and emotional assets and liabilities really well. By middle school, educational testing can help students look inside themselves and understand how their disabilities impact their studies and social lives. Knowing what they need from teachers, tutors, counselors, peers, and parents is a foundation for future growth.

Ask for Help 

It’s okay to be different; embrace it. I can’t emphasize this enough. I have friends who were told to hide their disabilities from teachers. As a result, they felt unhappy and defeated. It wasn’t until they got tested, shared their disabilities, and requested accommodations that they were able to finally get into a college and get the degree they wanted. The earlier students learn to work with their disability and understand it as part of their identities the better. Embracing our disabilities give us the confidence to talk with teachers, administrators, and trusted friends about what we like, what we are good at, and what we need help with. We often can’t, and don’t have to do it alone.

Never Use your Disability as an Excuse

It can be easy to say to a teacher, “I need an extension on this paper because I am slow at writing.” While this may be okay early on in school, it doesn’t work in college or the real world. So why get used to it? Rather than using a disability as an excuse, students must find ways to compensate. Figure out how to work efficiently and effectively, rather than longer and harder. Most kids with learning disabilities need help developing efficient work habits. Ask for help!

Use Compensatory Strategies

Working longer hours is necessary at times. But it can also lead to burnout. There are lots of compensatory strategies for learning, and many books on the topic. You’ve likely heard of many, including, making lists, getting organized, using memory tricks, etc. The key is finding the strategies that work and altering others to make them your own.

For example, I’m a very slow reader and got frustrated when I couldn’t finish reading assignments. But I’m a good listener and I understand high-level concepts. My strategy was to listen in class, research the topic, and then boil down the minimum reading necessary. Finding strategies that worked for me helped me set limits on my school work, gave me time to socialize, and helped me have time for myself.

Taking time away from stressful school work is essential for students with learning disabilities and contributes to better mental health. It also allows students to focus on bigger dreams, careers that might take 4-8 years of secondary education!

Know you can Achieve your Goals

Setting goals is important for all of us. And most importantly, we have to develop the determination to achieve them! I encourage students with LD/ADHD to find adults who give them positive messages of encouragement, who listen to them when they express self-doubt. With the right support and strategies, we can do anything we set our minds to!

Having learning disabilities and/or ADHD is not easy. And it doesn’t end when we finish school. With every change, come new challenges and strategy adjustments. I always remember what the famous educator, Booker T. Washington said more than 100 years ago, “I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles overcome while trying to succeed.” Challenges are what make life exciting—they are what define who we are and who we become. Embrace the challenges!

Source: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-moment-youth/201204/helping-children-thrive-ldadhd

Related Online Continuing Education Courses:

 
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Posted by on April 3, 2012 in General

 

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ADHD Awareness – Are You Up to Date?

September is ADHD Awareness MonthOver the past fifty years the childhood cognitive and behavioral problems categorized as disorders of attention, impulsivity and hyperactivity have presented a clinical challenge for physicians, educators, and mental health professionals. This symptom constellation referred to as Attention Deficit Disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD has become one of the most widely researched areas in childhood, adolescence and increasingly throughout the adult life span. For over thirty years problems arising from this constellation of symptoms have constituted the most chronic childhood behavior disorders and the largest single source of referrals to mental health centers.

Symptoms of ADHD constitute one of the most complex disorders of childhood. Despite efforts to reach a consensus definition and agreement that inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity are the hallmark for the diagnosis, debate continues concerning core deficits, associated problems and consequences. Increasingly it has been recognized that problems with faulty impulse control and self-regulation may lie at the core of problems for those with ADHD. Children with ADHD typically experience difficulty with home, school and community behavior involving family, peers, academics and emotional adjustment. The uneven, unpredictable behavior they demonstrate appears to be a function of knowing what to do but not always doing it. Their problems are one of inconsistency rather than inability. ADHD causes significant and pervasive impairment in day-to-day functioning.

Learn more about ADHD and earning continuing education credits @ www.pdresources.org:

Additional resources are available @ ADHDcentral.com

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Posted by on September 6, 2011 in General

 

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Go Green for Earth Week!

Earth Day 2011

“If one person takes one course online rather than traveling to a conference, he or she can achieve savings in energy, fuel costs, greenhouse gasses, paper and ink waste associated with printed reading and registration materials, water usage for hotel stays, waste from disposable food service products, and landfill disposal of used exhibition hall materials,” says Leo Christie, PhD, CEO of Professional Development Resources. “Multiply this times 100 or 1,000, and the environmental impact is enormous. Best of all, this is one place where environmental responsibility and user convenience intersect. Everybody wins.”

In celebration of Earth Week 2011, Professional Development Resources is contributing to the Billion Acts of Green movement by spotlighting the environmental benefits of a green education and offering special pricing on a number of its online courses. We invite our customers to join in by taking courses online instead of traveling to seminars and downloading and viewing on screen instead of consuming paper goods. Downloading is 90% more Earth-friendly than shipping packaged courses. If downloading our courses seems daunting, don’t worry! We’ve got the information and instructions to take you through downloading, completing and earning credit for courses:

Online Courses give you instant access to course reading materials and CE test (nothing is mailed). Course fee includes the downloadable reading materials (PDF document) and CE test (HTML format). Click here for more info!

The following online courses are being offered at 50% off regular price in honor of Earth Week:

Alcohol and Intimate Partner Violence | 2-Hour Online Course | Reg $24 | Go Green Promotion $12! | This course, which was developed by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), is focused on the definitions, profiles, detection and treatment of intimate partner violence (IPV) that is associated with alcohol abuse. It explores the complex relationship between alcohol and intimate partner violence for both victims and perpetrators, addressing various models that attempt to explain this relationship. The course describes the signs of alcohol-related intimate partner violence and a number of techniques for assessing and intervening with individuals who might be affected by or engaging in alcohol-related intimate partner violence. Appendices include the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST), a danger assessment protocol, and a beginning dialogue for an interviewing technique that clinicians can use to initiate a discussion about alcohol and IPV. NIAAA | 2005 | 24 pages | Course #20-23

Diagnosing ADHD in Adults | 3-Hour Online Course | Reg $42 | Go Green Promotion $21!This course will describe the unique ways in which the symptoms of ADHD manifest in adults, including the distinction between attention deficit and attention regulation. It also includes a discussion about the difficulties of accurately diagnosing ADHD in adults and the reasons the disorder is simultaneously over- and under-diagnosed. The DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for ADHD – as they apply to adult functioning – are placed into a context of the actual “soft signs” that can help clinicians identify areas of functional weakness for clients with ADHD. The author lists and details the components of a comprehensive diagnostic interview and emphasizes the value of collateral sources of historical information needed to establish an accurate diagnosis. Various formal assessment instruments are described, along with commentary about their utility in the diagnosis of adult ADHD. Finally, there is a section on the important area of comorbid conditions like depression and anxiety that frequently obscure and/or accompany ADHD. 2007 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions | Course #30-38

Dysphagia: Guide to Establishing a Restorative Mealtime Program | 2-Hour Online Course | Reg $28 | Go Green Promotion $14!This course will enable therapists in long-term care or post-acute rehabilitation facilities to present staff training that offers strategies and techniques for implementing a Restorative Mealtime Program for the purpose of making dining safe and enjoyable, increasing resident independence at mealtimes, and managing decreases in ability as disease processes progress. Also included are descriptions of dysphagic indicators, lists of aspiration precautions, methods for ascertaining needed levels of assistance, case studies, and a method for monitoring adherence to swallow safety standards. The author includes useful forms, checklists, and diagrams with limited permission for course participants to reproduce handouts for their own use in daily practice. Course #20-26 | 2010 | 34 pages | 20 posttest questions

PTSD – What is It? | 1-Hour Online Course | Reg $12 | Go Green Promotion $6! | This course provides an overview of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It describes the diagnostic criteria, prevalence of PTSD in veteran and civilian samples, comorbid conditions, longitudinal course, and risk factors. Empirically validated treatment options are briefly discussed. The course is based on one of a series of activities from the Department of Veterans Affairs – National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – PTSD 101 curriculum. PTSD 101 is a web-based curriculum of diverse topics focusing on issues related to combat stress/PTSD. This course consists of the speaker’s original lecture and selected slides transcribed verbatim without editorial modifications. 2007 | 16 pages | 15 posttest questions | Course #10-24

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Posted by on April 20, 2011 in General

 

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ASHA CEU Sale!

Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) are required to earn continuing education units (CEUs) to maintain their state licensure, and for their certification with ASHA.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology.

The following ONLINE COURSES are ON SALE until October 15, 2010:

The following MAIL ORDER COURSES are ON SALE until October 15, 2010:

 
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Posted by on August 12, 2010 in General

 

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