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Tag Archives: National Institute on Aging

The Dementias: Hope through Research is Now Approved for ASHA Credit

The Dementias - Hope Through ResearchA diagnosis of dementia can be frightening for those affected by the syndrome, their family members, and caretakers. Learning more about dementia can help.

The Dementias: Hope through Research is a new 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) that provides a general overview of dementia and specific types of dementia along with their signs and symptoms; lists risk factors that can increase a person’s chance of developing one or more kinds of dementia; describes how the disorders are diagnosed and treated, including drug therapy; and offers highlights of research that is supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute on Aging, both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Course #10-75 | 2012 | 20 pages | 10 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology.

This course is offered for .1 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level, Professional area).

ASHA credit expires 5/31/2017. ASHA CEUs are awarded by the ASHA CE Registry upon receipt of the quarterly completion report from the ASHA Approved CE Provider. Please note that the completion date that appears on ASHA transcripts is the last day of the quarter regardless of when the course was completed.

Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and is CE Broker compliant (courses are reported within one week of completion).

Source: The Dementias: Hope through Research Approved for ASHA Credit

 

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Latest Alzheimer’s Research Progress Report Released

2010 Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: A Deeper Understanding2010 Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: A Deeper Understanding, the latest annual Alzheimer’s research report from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is now available online. Prepared by the National Institute on Aging, which leads the NIH effort conducting and supporting research on age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, the report highlights important developments and directions in NIH-funded research, including:

  • risk for developing Alzheimer’s
  • genes that play a role in the disease
  • neuroimaging and biomarkers that detect and track the disease
  • research into new treatments
  • lifestyle factors that may worsen or protect against the disease
  • help for caregivers

Special features include animation showing the progression of Alzheimer’s in the brain and video interviews highlighting new insights into the disease.

Read online or download @ http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/2010-alzheimers-disease-progress-report-deeper-understanding.

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Posted by on February 24, 2012 in General

 

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New Alzheimer’s Criteria Would Change Diagnosis for Millions

By: Rachael Rettner, MyHealthNewsDaily Staff Writer

New Alzheimer's Criteria Would Change Diagnosis for MillionsAlmost everyone currently diagnosed with a mild form of Alzheimer’s disease would be downgraded to not having the condition, if new proposed criteria for the diagnosis of cognitive problems were applied, a new study shows.

Instead, people diagnosed as having “very mild” and “mild” Alzheimer’s disease would be reclassified as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is currently recognized as an intermittent stage between the normal loss of mental function that comes with age and the development of dementia.

The new criteria broaden the definition of mild cognitive impairment, and this will cause confusion when doctors try to diagnose MCI and Alzheimer’s, said study researcher Dr. John Morris, a professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Moreover, the new criteria highlight the fallacy of thinking about MCI and Alzheimer’s as different entities, Morris said.

“[The] idea that there is an MCI stage, distinct from very early Alzheimer’s disease, is artificial,” Morris said. “It really is the same disease process.”

Instead of widening the criteria so more people are diagnosed with MCI, researchers should do the opposite — try to figure how to winnow down the group of patients with MCI to find those who will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, Morris said. In fact, if a patient’s memory and thinking troubles are due to early Alzheimer’s, and not due to depression or medication use, “We can just call it very early Alzheimer’s disease. There’s no need to have this distinction,” Morris said.

The report is published online today (Feb. 6) in the Archives of Neurology.

Alzheimer’s Continuum

Previously, mild cognitive impairment was defined as a decline in cognitive function — which could include memory and language problems — that do not interfere with everyday activities.

But the new criteria, proposed by the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association, state that people with MCI have “independence in functional activities.”

This could mean that, as long as a person can do everyday activities by themselves, they would be classified as having MCI, even if they had mild problems with activities such as shopping, paying bills and cooking, Morris said. (In fact, having mild problems with such activities is a criterion for dementia, Morris said.)

To assess what the impact of the new criteria would be on patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, Morris analyzed information from 17,535 people who had been classified as having normal cognition, MCI or Alzheimer’s disease. Participants were classified based on how well they could function performing a variety of activities, including preparing meals and taking mediation.

The results showed 99.8 percent of patients currently diagnosed with very mild Alzheimer’s disease, and 92.7 percent of those diagnosed with mild Alzheimer’s disease, would be reclassified as having MCI based on the revised criteria.

Considering about 2.5 million people have very mild Alzheimer’s disease, the findings suggest that, very roughly, about 2.2 million people could be reclassified as having MCI (although this calculation is speculative), Morris said.

Need for Biomarkers

William Thies, chief medical and scientific officer at the Alzheimer’s Association, said the proposed criteria for MCI are less than a year old, and experts will likely continue to discuss and tweak them in the years to come.

“We are really now working on trying to identify exactly where people will fit in the continuum of Alzheimer’s disease,” Thies said.

Thies agreed the disease is a continuous process, and said you could likely not tell the difference between someone with the most severe case of MCI and someone with the mildest case of Alzheimer’s disease.

But Thies said he does not think the new criteria will create much confusion. They are intended to be used by experts in the field, some of whom have already been thinking of MCI in the manner described by the new criteria. And others who are very conservative when it comes to diagnosing people with Alzheimer’s disease likely won’t change their ways, he said.

Thies also said the field should move toward identifying which patients with MCI are actually in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. This could be done once there are well defined biomarkers for the condition, Thies said.

While the field is moving toward this goal, it will likely be a while before biomarkers are routinely used by doctors to diagnose patients, he said.

Pass it on: Identification of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease will make it easier to diagnosis the condition in its early stages.

Source: http://www.myhealthnewsdaily.com/2204-alzhimers-disease-criteria-mild-cognitive-impairment.html

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Posted by on February 6, 2012 in General

 

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End of Life: Helping with Comfort and Care

At the end of life, each story is different. Death comes suddenly, or a person lingers, gradually failing. For some older people, the body weakens while the mind stays alert. Others remain physically strong, and cognitive losses take a huge toll. But for everyone, death is inevitable, and each loss is personally felt by those close to the one who has died.

End-of-life care is the term used to describe the support and medical care given during the time surrounding death. Such care does not happen just in the moments before breathing finally stops and a heart ceases to beat. An older person is often living, and dying, with one or more chronic illnesses and needs a lot of care for days, weeks, and sometimes even months.

End of LIfe - Online CE Course

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End of Life: Helping With Comfort and Care, a 1-hour continuing education course for healthcare professionals, hopes to make the unfamiliar territory of death slightly more comfortable for everyone involved. This publication is based on research, such as that supported by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. This research base is augmented with suggestions from practitioners with expertise in helping individuals and families through this difficult time. Throughout the booklet, the terms comfort care, supportive care, and palliative care are used to describe individualized care that can provide a dying person the best quality of life until the end. Most of the stories in this booklet are fictitious, but they depict situations that reflect common experiences at the end of life.

When a doctor says something like, “I’m afraid the news is not good. There are no other treatments for us to try. I’m sorry,” it may close the door to the possibility of a cure, but it does not end the need for medical support. Nor does it end the involvement of family and friends. There are many places and a variety of ways to provide care for an older person who is dying. Such care often involves a team. If you are reading this, then you might be part of such a team.

Helping With Comfort and Care provides an overview of issues commonly facing people caring for someone nearing the end of life. It can help you to work with health care providers to complement their medical and caregiving efforts. The booklet does not replace the personal and specific advice of the doctor, but it can help you make sense of what is happening and give you a framework for making care decisions.

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Posted by on September 12, 2011 in General

 

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Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease

Via Scoop.itHealthcare Continuing Education
Understanding Alzheimer's Disease
Free resource from the National Institute on Aging

Many older people forget someone’s name or misplace things from time to time. This kind of forgetfulness is normal. But, forgetting how to get home, getting confused in places a person knows well, or asking questions over and over can be signs of a more serious problem. The person may have Alzheimer’s disease, a disease of the brain that begins slowly and gets worse over time.

This colorful, easy-to-read booklet helps readers learn about Alzheimer’s disease:

  • What it is
  • Signs of the disease
  • When it is important to see a doctor
  • Treatment
  • Research studies
  • How to get help caring for a person with the disease

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Posted by on August 25, 2011 in General

 

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Alzheimer’s Continuing Education

Alzheimer's Continuing Education

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Alzheimer’s currently affects one in 10 people over age 65 and nearly half of those individuals over 85. With such an outlook, it’s imperative that healthcare professionals stay current on the research and best practices for treatment and caregiving.

Professional Development Resources offers online continuing education courses to address this growing topic:

Alzheimer’s Disease & Related Disorders (ADRD) – This course provides an in-depth discussion of the management of Alzheimer’s Disease or Related Disorders (ADRD), including disease progression and strategies for care. It considers all aspects of ADRD, including the various stages of the disease, problem behaviors, communication issues, ethical considerations and appropriate activities. In addition, strategies are presented for working with families and caregivers of ADRD patients. 2006 | 47 pages | 27 posttest questions | 3 hours CE

Alzheimer’s Disease: Nutrition Intervention Strategies – Alzheimer’s disease is a disorder of forgetfulness that eventually impacts a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living. It takes a devastating toll on both patients and those who care for them. Those with Alzheimer’s disease experience immense fear and frustration as they struggle with simple tasks. Family, friends, and caregivers experience pain and stress as they watch Alzheimer’s disease slowly take their loved ones away from them. Many individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are cared for in institutional settings. Nutrition plays an important role in meeting the needs of such persons. This course will familiarize readers with the early warning signs of dementia, discuss the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease, identify pharmacological, environmental, and behavioral interventions used at various stages of the disease, and describe nutrition-related complications and intervention strategies. 2002 | 15 pages | 12 posttest questions | 2 hours CE

Alzheimer’s Disease – Overview – Alzheimer’s disease is an increasing concern for the aging American population. It is important for healthcare providers to have a basic familiarity with the disease, in order to provide adequate diagnosis, treatment, and referrals. This course, based on documents from the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association, provides an overview of the prevalence, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and progression of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as information about caregiving and caregiver support. As such, this course is relevant to all clinicians who work with elderly individuals, their families, and their caretakers. Course #10-39 | 2010 | 34 pages | 7 posttest questions | 1 hour CE

Alzheimer’s – Unraveling the Mystery – Alzheimer’s dementia is a growing concern among the aging Baby Boomers; yet, modern science points the way to reducing the risks through maintaining a healthy lifestyle. This course is based on a publication from the National Institute on Aging, which describes healthy brain functioning during the aging process and then contrasts it to the processes of Alzheimer’s disease. Full of colorful, detailed diagrams, this educational booklet describes the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, effective steps for prevention, strategies for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease, and the search for new treatments. Strategies for caregivers and reducing caregiver stress are also discussed briefly. Course #30-54 | 2008 | 43 pages | 21 posttest questions | 3 hours CE

Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease – This course is based on the public-access publication, Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease: Your Easy-to-Use Guide from the National Institute on Aging. The booklet discusses practical issues concerning caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, including a description of common challenges and coping strategies. Advice is provided regarding keeping the person safe, providing everyday care, adapting activities to suit their needs, and planning ahead for health, legal, and financial issues. Chapters also discuss self-care for caregivers, sources of assistance for caregivers in need, residential options for care, common medical issues, and end-of-life care. This course is relevant to clinicians who work with elderly individuals, their families, and their caretakers. Course #30-59 | 2010 | 146 pages | 22 posttest questions | 3 hours CE

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASHA: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (AAUM)
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)
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Posted by on August 11, 2011 in General

 

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