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Tag Archives: Nutrition for Eating Disorders

Florida Dietitian & Nutritionist License Renewal Information

As a Florida RDN who happens to work in CE, I get lots of questions this time of year about what we need to renew. So here’s a quick recap of our requirements, plus I’ve included a 20% off coupon to help with any remaining CE needs. ūüôā

CE Required: 30 hours every 2 years, of which:
2 hours on Preventing Medical Errors in Nutrition are required each renewal
3 hours on HIV/AIDS are required for your first renewal only
Up to 20 hours may be earned through online (home study) courses
License Renewal Deadline: May 31, 2015

10 of the 30 required hours must be “live.” You can take certain webinars to meet the live hours as long as they allow for interaction between you and the speaker.

Still need CE? You can save 20% on all online CE courses @ PDR (up to 20 hours allowed per renewal) and we report to CE Broker for you.

20% Off Florida RDN CEUs

Enter coupon code PDRPC208 at checkout to redeem.

Here are a few popular online CE courses:

  • Nutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders.
  • Nutrition Education for Diabetes Mellitus is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the rationale and goals for providing medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus.
  • Adult Obesity: Prevention and Treatment is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides Registered Dietitian/Nutritionists (RDNs) with evidence-based, non-biased information on the prevention and treatment of obesity in adults.

Please let me know if you have any other questions. I’m happy to help! And please feel free to share this information with friends and colleagues.

Your friend in CE,
Gina Ulery, MS, RDN, LD/N
Director of Operations & Marketing
Professional Development Resources

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the Florida Council of Dietetics and Nutrition (Provider #50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

 

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Children with ADHD at Higher Risk for Eating Disorder

Story from Medical News Today

A new study has suggested that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely than other children to also have loss of control eating syndrome – a condition similar to binge eating disorder. The finding suggests the two conditions may share a common biological mechanism.

child eatingThe research, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, could potentially lead to the development of treatment that works for both conditions.

Although many children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) lose weight when taking stimulant drugs to treat their condition, experts have found associations between ADHD and overweight and obesity.

Data have also linked ADHD with adult binge eating disorder. However, there are limited data in children with loss of control eating syndrome (LOC-ES) – a condition that shares many of the same diagnostic criteria as binge eating disorder and is typified by an inability to stop eating at certain times.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that, as of 2011, approximately 11% of children in the US aged 4-17 (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD. The common behavioral disorder is characterized by hyperactivity, impulsive behavior and difficulty sustaining attention.

Experts believe that the cause of excessive weight in some children with ADHD may be attributable to a connection between the impulsivity that typifies ADHD and a loss of control over food consumption.

For the study, Dr. Shauna Reinblatt, assistant professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and colleagues assessed 79 children aged 8-14 to see whether such a connection exists.

Each participating child was assessed with a number of tests, interviews and parental reports in order to diagnose or discount ADHD and LOC-ES. Neuropsychological tests were also conducted to measure how well the participants were able to control their impulses.

Read more: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/293236.php

Related Online Continuing Education Courses:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a 1-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that gives a brief update on the various facets of ADHD. It details the core symptoms, including behavioral manifestations of each, notes what is known about its causes, and lists the components of a comprehensive diagnostic protocol. It also describes a multifaceted treatment approach that includes combined medication, psychotherapy, and behavioral therapy. The course includes sections on comorbid disorders, dealing with ADHD at school, and treating it in teens and adults. Course #10-65 | 2012 | 24 pages | 10 posttest questions

The Impact of a Life of ADHD: Understanding for Clinicians and Clients is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that discusses the many ways a lifetime of ADHD can affect a person’s life. This is important information for all clinicians working with adults who have ADHD, partly for their own understanding, but also to help clients understand their own ADHD. It will include descriptions of situations that can obscure ADHD and will highlight the executive, academic, occupational, psychological, and social aspects of adult functioning that are impacted by ADHD. The second section involves educating clients about the many ways that ADHD has affected their life trajectories. This goes beyond the obvious academic difficulties and includes current functioning as well, offering less pejorative explanations for their weaknesses. Included are techniques for involving family members, creating an ADHD-friendly lifestyle, and finding a better fit in the classroom and the workplace. This education is a crucial first step in the treatment of ADHD in adults and builds the foundation for medication, coaching, and therapy. Closeout Course #30-48 | 2009 | 32 pages | 20 posttest questions

Nutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders. Effective treatment of eating disorders requires multidimensional and individualized interventions. Education that addresses the normal nutritional needs and the physiologic effects of starvation and refeeding is a critical component of treatment. Management often requires long-term nutritional counseling of the patient which may extend several years. This course will describe the rationale and use of providing Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) for the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and Binge Eating Disorder. Included are: Criteria for Diagnosing Eating Disorders; Role of Dieting in the Development of Eating Disorders; Symptomology; Treatment Overview; Nutrition Therapy; Reconnecting with Hunger and Satiety; Use of Exercise; Working with a Therapist; Pharmacotherapy; In-Patient versus Out-Patient Treatment; Refeeding; Establishing a Dietary/Eating Pattern; Comparing Traditional and Health at Every Size (HAES) Approaches to Health Enhancement; Recovery from Eating Disorders; Nutrition Care Process; and the Core Minimum Guide. Course #30-80 | 2015 | 24 pages | 21 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Girls with Type 1 Diabetes at High Risk for Eating Disorders

By age 25 years, cumulative probability of onset of eating disorder is 60 percent.

Eating disorders common is girls with Type 1 diabetesFor girls and young women with type 1 diabetes, eating disorders are common and persistent, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care.

Patricia A. Colton, M.D., from the University Health Network in Toronto, and colleagues describe the longitudinal course of disturbed eating behavior (DEB) and eating disorders in 126 girls with type 1 diabetes. The girls participated in a series of seven interview-based assessments of eating disorder behavior and psychopathology over a 14-year period.

The researchers found that the mean age was 11.8 and 23.7 years at time 1 and time 7, respectively. At time 7, 32.4 and 8.5 percent of participants met the criteria for a current eating disorder and had a subthreshold eating disorder, respectively. The mean age at eating disorder onset was 22.6 years, and by age 25 years the cumulative probability of onset was 60 percent. There was an average of 4.3 years between onset of eating disorder and subsequent eating disorder remission; by six years after onset, the cumulative probability of remission was 79 percent. There was an average of 6.5 years between remission of eating disorder and subsequent recurrence; by six years after remission, the cumulative probability of recurrence was 53 percent.

“Future research should focus on the development and testing of strategies for the prevention and treatment of DEB and eating disorders in this high-risk group,” the authors write.

Source: http://www.physiciansbriefing.com/Article.asp?AID=698620

Related Online Continuing Education (CE/CEU) Courses:

Nutrition for Eating DisordersNutrition for Eating Disorders is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the goals of nutrition therapy for the treatment of eating disorders. Effective treatment of eating disorders requires multidimensional and individualized interventions. Education that addresses the normal nutritional needs and the physiologic effects of starvation and refeeding is a critical component of treatment. Management often requires long-term nutritional counseling of the patient which may extend several years. This course will describe the rationale and use of providing Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) for the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and Binge Eating Disorder. Included are: Criteria for Diagnosing Eating Disorders; Role of Dieting in the Development of Eating Disorders; Symptomology; Treatment Overview; Nutrition Therapy; Reconnecting with Hunger and Satiety; Use of Exercise; Working with a Therapist; Pharmacotherapy; In-Patient versus Out-Patient Treatment; Refeeding; Establishing a Dietary/Eating Pattern; Comparing Traditional and Health at Every Size (HAES) Approaches to Health Enhancement; Recovery from Eating Disorders; Nutrition Care Process; and the Core Minimum Guide. Course #30-80 | 2015 | 24 pages | 21 posttest questions

Nutrition Education for Diabetes MellitusNutrition Education for Diabetes Mellitus is a 2-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes the rationale and goals for providing medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus.¬†Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how the body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to health because it’s an important source of energy for the cells that make up the muscles and tissues. It’s also the brain’s main source of fuel. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes ‚ÄĒ when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes ‚ÄĒ and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. This course describes the rationale and goals for providing medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus. Included are: recommendations for specific nutrient modifications; nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring and evaluation; exercise and stress; gastropathy; enteral nutrition; testing and classifications; medications and insulin; blood glucose meters; and methods of meal planning. Nutrition education tools and handouts are provided to assist the dietitian in counseling clients.¬†Course #21-08 | 2015 | ¬†26 pages | 14 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is a CPE Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR #PR001). CPE accreditation does not constitute endorsement by CDR of provider programs or materials. Professional Development Resources is also a provider with the Florida Council of Dietetics and Nutrition (#50-1635) and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within 1 week of completion).

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2015 in Nutrition & Dietetics

 

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