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A Short Course on Encryption and Cloud Storage

Course excerpt from Ethics & Risk Management: Expert Tips 8

Encryption and cloud storage is a complicated area because it requires an analysis of the interplay of several variables, including confidentiality, encryption, cloud storage and HIPAA. Each of these variables is complex, but there are ways to make the situation more manageable.

Cloud storageEncryption and cloud storage. Let’s consider a few common questions:

“For the purposes of HIPAA, if you have adequately encrypted your data, does your cloud storage provider need to sign a Business Associate Agreement (BAA)?”

The bottom line is that there is no crystal-clear answer to this question. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) hasn’t specifically addressed this issue, so we are faced with the question of how to interpret the security rule.

There are two basic interpretations: “no,” and “yes.” Both have some support, and if you proceed with one interpretation you should consider the countervailing position.

First, the basics: HIPAA Covered Entities (CEs) who work with vendors are required to have their vendors sign BAAs. This is required because it allows the federal government to enforce the provisions of HIPAA on these third-party vendors.

The public policy at work is that CEs shouldn’t be allowed to offload their legal responsibilities to a third party that isn’t subject to regulatory oversight. BAAs are required whenever a third-party vendor has access to Protected Health Information (PHI).

Here’s where it gets complicated. PHI is identifiable data, but if the data are encrypted they are not identifiable. In such a case, why is a BAA necessary?

The interpretation against requiring a BAA for encrypted data finds some support in one of HIPAA’s safe harbor provisions, which states that losses of encrypted data do not trigger a breach notification (the letter CEs send out that apologetically admits to the disclosure of protected health information).

The reason why breach notifications is not required for encrypted data are that the data remain inaccessible if encrypted. The covered entity has essentially lost gibberish.

Thus, this interpretation goes, BAAs are also not required because the vendor does not have access to protected health information. That makes sense. However, it should be noted that this is a fairly permissive interpretation and HHS has declined to endorse this position.

The competing interpretation, which appears to be strongly supported by the official commentary on related regulations (especially the 2013 HITECH amendments to the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules), is that BAAs are required even when the data are encrypted.

Support for this position includes: HHS has not made the criteria for breach notifications the same as the criteria for needing a BAA.

The statutory exceptions for BAAs, such as those with incidental access (e.g., a janitor or electrician) or those who are mere “conduits,” do not apply to cloud storage providers. HHS has indicated that a data storage company is not a conduit because of the “persistent nature” of its contact with the data. Thus, it is persistency, and not the degree of access, that HHS has specifically indicated warrants consideration for the purposes of BAAs.

Commentary prior to the adoption of the security rule asked whether or not BAAs could be something that CEs could address, and thus render unnecessary. In other words, the question was asked, “if we as CEs take adequate security measures to ensure the protection of PHI, can we make BAAs unnecessary?” HHS specifically declined to make BAAs an “addressable” requirement.

Besides the issue of protecting PHI, BAs have additional responsibilities. These responsibilities include accessibility, data integrity, etc. If encryption enabled vendors to escape “business associate” (BA) status, HHS would have no jurisdiction. (From a risk management perspective, the execution of a BAA is something that many CEs do to “distribute” the risk.)

The definition of BA isn’t explicitly restricted to those who have access to PHI. The definition also includes those who perform “any other function or activity regulated by this subchapter.” (See 45 CFR 160.103(1)(i)(B)) The amount of functions and activities that are regulated under HIPAA is huge.

I want to emphasize that I understand the argument that where vendors have absolutely no access to PHI because the data are encrypted, the vendor doesn’t have encryption keys, etc., then HIPAA is (theoretically) a non-issue. It makes a lot of sense. However, we just don’t know at this time if HHS agrees with that position and we have some strong evidence that casts this position as too narrow.

However, the ambiguity also applies to the other interpretation: We don’t know if HHS agrees with the position that the storage of encrypted PHI (where the vendor has zero access to the PHI) still requires a BAA.

I hope this helps or at least provides some things to consider.


By Adam Alban, PhD, JD

Adam Alban, PhD, JD, hosts a website of general information for mental health professionals in California. He has an M.A. and PhD in clinical psychology from Michigan State University and a JD from American University in Washington, D.C. He operates a law practice specializing in legal assistance to mental health practitioners and also has a clinical psychology practice, the Alban Psychology Group. He may be reached at: alban@clinicallawyer.com.


Ethics & Risk Management: Expert Tips 8 is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE) course that addresses a wide variety of ethics and risk management topics, written by experts in the field.

This online course provides instant access to the course materials (PDF download) and CE test. After enrolling, click on My Account and scroll down to My Active Courses. From here you’ll see links to download/print the course materials and take the CE test (you can print the test to mark your answers on it while reading the course document). Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion.

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 

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Legal, Clinical, and Ethical Implications of Legalized Marijuana

By Stephen Behnke, JD, PhD, MDiv, from Ethics & Risk Management: Expert Tips VII

Implications of Legalized MarijuanaRecently the APA Ethics Office was approached with a question: What implications does the legalization of marijuana in two jurisdictions have on psychology ethics? The question has no immediate or obvious answer.

Issues will undoubtedly emerge over time as psychologists work within these jurisdictions and between jurisdictions that have different legal approaches to the use of marijuana. Nonetheless, the question offers an opportunity to begin thinking about the implications of evolving jurisdictional laws that govern the use of substances.

A useful framework is to consider the question from three closely related perspectives: legal, clinical and ethical. This analysis first isolates a specific kind of question, and then examines how the different kinds of questions interact. Thus, the analysis offers a two-step process.

From the perspective of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (2002, amended 2010), a central standard is 2.01(a), Boundaries of Competence: “(a) Psychologists provide services, teach and conduct research with populations and in areas only within the boundaries of their competence, based on their education, training, supervised experience, consultation, study or professional experience.”

The issue raised by standard 2.01(a) is whether it is within the boundaries of the treating psychologist’s competence to work with an individual who is using this particular substance. From the perspective of the Ethics Code, there is no distinction among substances – for example between marijuana and alcohol.

The psychologist must have the appropriate knowledge and skill to treat an individual with the particular individual’s pattern of use or gain the requisite knowledge and skills in the ways that standard 2.01(a) identifies. For this reason, there is an inextricable nexus between the ethical and the clinical, insofar as the Ethics Code says that the psychologist must have the appropriate clinical competence. New laws on the use of a particular substance do not seem directly relevant to this aspect of the analysis.

Ethical standard 2.01(f) may bring in the law in a manner that standard 2.01(a) does not: “(f) When assuming forensic roles, psychologists are or become reasonably familiar with the judicial or administrative rules governing their roles.”

Standard 2.01(f) places the ethical mandate for competence into forensic contexts. In a forensic context, the legal status of a substance that a client is using may be highly relevant to a forensic assessment.

Consider a psychologist who is conducting a child custody evaluation. Two parents live in separate jurisdictions, one of which has legalized the use of marijuana, the other has not. Both parents use marijuana in similar ways regarding the amount and frequency. The evaluator may find it appropriate to take into consideration that in one jurisdiction, the parent is using a substance that is illegal.

In this scenario, clinical considerations regarding substance use may be less relevant – if relevant at all – in comparison with the legal considerations of a parent who is engaging in an illegal activity. The clinical perspective may enter the analysis when the psychologist poses the question: Why would an individual engage in a behavior that may be directly contrary to that individual’s stated goal, i.e., maximizing access to his or her children? In this instance, the legal, ethical and clinical questions converge.

One can easily imagine other types of assessments where the legal status of an activity could be relevant. Ethical Standard 9.01(a), Bases for Assessments, states: “Psychologists base the opinions contained in their recommendations, reports and diagnostic or evaluative statements, including forensic testimony, on information and techniques sufficient to substantiate their findings. (See also Standard 2.04, Bases for Scientific and Professional Judgments.)”

Standard 9.01(a) is not limited to forensic contexts. For certain jobs, knowingly engaging in activities that are illegal can be perceived as a reflection of one’s judgment. This consideration may be especially important for assessing individuals for leadership positions. Again, the legal, ethical and clinical converge, insofar as ethical standard 9.01(a) states that it is appropriate to take the legal status of an activity into consideration when such information substantiates a psychologist’s recommendation, report or diagnostic or evaluative statement. Likewise, evaluations in a criminal context may depend to a substantial degree on whether an individual is abiding by the law or engaging in illegal behaviors.

How the evolving legal status of marijuana will affect psychologists’ work is an interesting and important question that has no immediate or obvious answer. The nuances and contours of the question will necessarily emerge over time, and the APA Ethics Office will follow the issue with interest.

social stigmaOne especially intriguing area will be that of social stigma. Although social attitudes toward marijuana are changing, it is still viewed with suspicion – much more so than is alcohol – by a substantial segment of our society. It will be important to examine how such attitudes “seep” over into evaluations of marijuana use even in jurisdictions where it has been legalized.

Ethical Standard 2.04, Bases for Scientific and Professional Judgments, states: “Psychologists’ work is based upon established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline. (See also Standards 2.01a, Boundaries of Competence, and 10.01b, Informed Consent to Therapy.)”

Part of the challenge for psychologists in jurisdictions that have recently legalized marijuana will be to examine the extent to which their work – grounded in research, data and clinical experience – is interpreted and applied by decision makers whose attitudes may be influenced by factors that do not have a basis in the “established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline” of psychology.

When psychologists have a reaction of “Wait, that’s not what I was saying about the research,” they may consider ethical standard 1.01, Misuse of Psychologists’ Work:

“If psychologists learn of misuse or misrepresentation of their work, they take reasonable steps to correct or minimize the misuse or misrepresentation.”

Psychologists may look to the research regarding marijuana to see where and how social attitudes deviate from the data. Although it is much too early to know exactly how evolving marijuana laws will affect the application of the Ethics Code, it is reasonable to assume that ethics educators across jurisdictions will have ample opportunity to think about this interesting ethical question as time goes on.

Ethics and Risk Management: Expert Tips VII is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that addresses a variety of ethics and risk management topics in psychotherapy practice in the form of 22 archived articles from The National Psychologist and is intended for psychotherapists of all specialties.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; theOhio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Celebrating our 20th Birthday!

Professional Development Resources has now been providing accredited continuing education courses to psychologists, social workers, counselors, speech-language pathologists, registered dietitians and occupational therapists is celebrating it's 20th birthdayWe have now been providing accredited continuing education courses to psychologists, social workers, counselors, speech-language pathologists, registered dietitians and occupational therapists for 20 continuous years! Our company, which started as one person presenting a single live seminar to small groups in selected Florida cities, is now an established entity in the world of continuing education featuring over 170 CE courses that are available online 24/7 anywhere in the world.

We have earned formal recognition as a provider of continuing education by major professional boards, including the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). In addition, we are recognized by professional boards in Florida, California, Ohio, Illinois, South Carolina, and Texas.

“It is really hard to believe we have been doing this for 20 years,” says Leo Christie, PhD, licensed marriage and family therapist and president of Professional Development Resources. “It is gratifying to look around us today and see where we are now, as compared with the early years. We are squarely in the digital world, with all of our continuing education courses available via the Internet and nearly all of our procedures completely paperless. As opposed to offering live seminars to small select audiences as we did when we started, we can now make our CE curriculum available to professionals anywhere in the world.”

It has not always been easy according to Christie. There were hard times, as one would expect in any business that has persisted for 20 years. “There were times I was not at all sure we were going to make it. When we transitioned from presenting live seminars to offering home study courses, it was a major transformation that required re-purposing our entire curriculum. Presenting material in written format is fundamentally different from doing so in live settings. Suddenly we had an urgent need for more topics and more courses. We had gotten along well with five or six topics in live seminars, but that was far too few to offer for self-study. Our most pressing and challenging task was curriculum development.”

Today, we have over 170 online continuing education courses covering a very wide variety of clinical topics such as domestic violence, professional ethics and boundaries, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), autism, Alzheimer’s, alternative therapies, mindfulness, multicultural issues, substance abuse and addiction, gender identity, preventing medical errors, ADHD, psychopharmacology, brain injury, eliminating self-defeating behaviors, overeating and obesity, treating chronic pain, and anxiety management. There are even a few unexpected and non-traditional courses, like Animal Assisted Therapy and Electronic Media and Youth Violence (Cyber-Bullying).

As a 20th birthday present to ourselves and all of our loyal customers, we are poised to launch a  new and revolutionary website platform, which will feature a wide array of user engagement tools we hope will propel us into the next 20 years.

About Professional Development Resources, Inc.

Professional Development Resources is a Florida nonprofit educational corporation founded in 1992 by licensed marriage and family therapist Leo Christie, PhD. The company, which is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) – as well as many other national and state boards – has focused its efforts on making continuing education courses more cost-effective and widely accessible to health professionals by offering online home study coursework. Its current expanded curriculum includes a wide variety of clinical topics intended to equip health professionals to offer state-of-the art services to their clients.

 

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License Renewal & Continuing Education for Massachusetts Psychologists

License Renewal & Continuing Education for Massachusetts PsychologistsMassachusetts-licensed psychologists have a biennial license renewal deadline of June 30, even years. 20 hours of board-approved continuing education are required to renew. The board recognizes The American Psychological Association as a provider of continuing education courses for Massachusetts psychologists.

The purpose of continuing education is to assure high standards for the practice of psychology by requiring licensees to participate in on-going educational activities. Through these experiences, licensees may increase their competence and enhance the knowledge obtained during prior education and training.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Massachusetts psychologists may earn all 20 of their required hours through online coursework offered @ http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Psychology/Online/CourseID/1/

Continuing Education Requirements

All licensees are required, as a condition of license renewal, to complete a minimum of 20 hours of continuing education activities per licensure/renewal period (every two years).

All 20 hours may be earned in formal learning programs with specific learning objectives sponsored by Board-recognized entities.

Continuing education activities in the form of publication of books, chapters of books, and/or articles in refereed journals, relevant to the science or practice of psychology may be substituted for not more than ten of the total 20 hours of continuing education activities required per licensure/renewal period.

Evaluation and Verification of Continuing Education Hours and Programs

At the time of renewal, each licensee will be required to submit a signed, notarized statement, on a form provided by the Board, attesting to completion of the continuing education requirements.

All continuing education activities required for licensure renewal must be clearly psychological in content and/or directly relevant to the science or practice of psychology.

For each continuing education hour earned by participation in formal learning programs, the licensee must be able to document the following information:

  • the title of the program
  • the number of hours spent in the program
  • the name of the Board-recognized entity which sponsored the program
  • the date the program was given

For each continuing education activity hour earned by publication of books, chapters of books, and/or articles in refereed journals, the licensee must be able to document the following information:

  • the title of the book, chapter or article and, in the case of a chapter or article, the title of the book or name of the journal in which it appears
  • the date of publication
  • the names of any co-authors

The Board may require the licensee to provide a copy of the book, chapter or article that he/she is relying on as a continuing education activity.

Failure to comply with the continuing education requirements will result in the non-renewal of the license.

The Board of Registration of Psychologists: http://www.mass.gov/ocabr/licensee/dpl-boards/py/

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2012 in General

 

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Course Spotlight: Improving Communication with Your Young Clients

Improving Communication with Your Young Clients is one of our most top-rated online continuing education courses, receiving rave reviews from SLPs, OTs, social workers and psychologists.

Course Abstract:

Improving Communication with Your Young ClientsHealthy professional and personal relationships rely heavily on effective communication techniques and respectful conversational skills. Clinicians and other professionals who work with children and their families can benefit from adding to their repertoire by learning communication techniques that improve the quality of these relationships. The correct use of language can increase your young clients’ self-esteem, motivate children to learn, engage their willing cooperation, defuse power struggles, and teach conflict resolution skills. With this information, you will also be better prepared to manage difficult conversations. The purpose of this course is to teach clinicians effective and practical communication and conversational skills to use in the classroom and in one-on-one situations with young clients and their families. Course #30-33 | 2009 | 62 pages | 20 posttest questions

Customer Reviews:

“This course was great! I loved the examples provided for review and they highlighted the information for learning. Great for all therapists, families, medical and education supporters for our young clients.” – P.C. (SLP)

“I enjoyed this course and would recommend it to others.” R.L. (OT)

“I loved this one..my favorite so far! As a parent and professional, I will be using it immediately!” – J.S. (SLP)

“This was a very good course. I will definitely use this knowledge every day as a school-based COTA. I would highly recommend this course to fellow therapists. Actually, I wish I had taken this course before having had children of my own!” – A.B. (SLP)

“Interesting, a good way to review and think about current caseload of children.” – J.H. (SLP)

“This was by far the best course I’ve completed out of 15+. The materials were informative, clear and concise without being too vague.  Great course.” – K.L. (Social Worker)

“Best course ever! My favorite! Very informative and extremely well written. This is a course that everyone could use in teaching them effective ways to communicate with others at any level.” – L.M. (Psychologist)

“I appreciate the large number of references. Thank you!” – M.R. (SLP)

“Loved all the examples…helped to clarify.” – D.D. (SLP)

“Very good course, with pertinent learning and tools for use with clients, their parents, and teachers/other people involved in client’s care and education.” – J.A.H. (OT)

“This is an excellent course. The topic and ideas are very practical, and since they are written from a therapist viewpoint, they are very applicable to my situation (school OT). The text was straightforward and easy to read, not bogged down in endless reporting of “studies” and “research” (though this was certainly evidence based).” – K.C. (OT)

“Excellent course and reference material-will definitely improve my behavior management during tx. This course will also help me to address consultations with my students’ classroom teachers as the time available to them to understand and manage behavioral differences within the school day is small – this material carries very easy, fast and effective ways to assist these teachers within a small window of time.” – P.S. (SLP)

Learning Objectives:

1. Identify six skills for responding empathically to children’s negative feelings
2. Name ten techniques that help engage children’s cooperation
3. List six skills adults can use to avoid punishment and deliver discipline effectively
4. Identify seven techniques for encouraging children’s autonomy
5. Discriminate between evaluative praise and descriptive praise
6. Name nine temperamental traits that affect therapist/client communication

About the Author:

Adina Soclof, MS, CCC-SLP, a certified Speech Pathologist, received her master’s degree from Hunter College in New York in Communication Sciences. She worked as a Speech Pathologist in preschools for the developmentally disabled in the New York school system before staying home full time with her family. She reentered the workforce as a Parent Educator for Bellefaire Jewish Children’s Bureau facilitating “How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids will Talk,” and “Siblings Without Rivalry” workshops and presentations based on “Raising Your Spirited Child.” Adina also runs workshops based on “How to Talk so Kids can Learn: At Home and at School” for teachers and other mental health professionals. She has been featured at numerous non-profit organizations and private schools in Cleveland. Adina developed TEAM Communication Ventures and conducts parenting and teacher training via telephone nation wide. She lives with her husband and four lively children in Cleveland, Ohio.

CE Information:

Professional Development Resources is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the following:
AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association (#3159)
APA: American Psychological Association
ASHA: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (AAUM)
ASWB: Association of Social Work Boards (#1046)
CDR: Commission on Dietetic Registration (#PR001)
NBCC: National Board for Certified Counselors (#5590)
NAADAC: National Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors (#00279)
California: Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625)
Florida: Boards of SW, MFT & MHC (#BAP346); Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635); Occupational Therapy Practice (#34). PDResources is CE Broker compliant.
Illinois: DPR for Social Work (#159-00531)
Ohio: Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501)
South Carolina: Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193)
Texas: Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) & State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678)
 
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Posted by on March 15, 2012 in General

 

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License Renewal & Continuing Education Information for Louisiana Psychologists

Louisiana psychologist licenses expire annually on July 31st.

Louisiana psychologists can earn all 30 hours for renewal online!Each psychologist is required to complete 30 hours of credit of continuing education within the biennial reporting period, with 2 of the 30 in ethics or forensics. [Odd licensees report on odd years, even licensees report in even years (i.e., License #3120 reports in 2012)].

The biennial reporting period is July 1st through June 30th (i.e., July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013).

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Louisiana psychologists can earn all 30 hours for renewal through online (home study) coursework offered @ http://www.pdresources.org/Courses/Psychology/Online/CourseID/1/.

Licensees can accumulate continuing education hours of credit in six primary ways:

  • completion for credit of a graduate level course, sponsored by an acceptable institution of higher education
  • documentation, by the instructor, of the completion of at least 75 percent of any audited graduate level course which is sponsored by an acceptable institution of higher education
  • preparation and teaching of a graduate level psychology course in an accredited institution of higher education;
  • completion of continuing education activities conducted or approved by an acceptable institution or organization
  • preparation and teaching of a seminar or workshop conducted under the sponsorship of an acceptable institution or organization
  • registered attendance at a professional meeting, conference, or convention which lasts one full day or longer

Acceptable continuing education activities are defined as:

  • formally organized and planned instructional experiences
  • programs which have objectives compatible with the post-doctoral educational needs of the licensed psychologist
  • professional meetings, conferences, or conventions lasting one full day or longer which are designed to promote professional development

The board will recognize the following as acceptable sponsors of the continuing education requirements:

  • accredited institutions of higher education
  • hospitals which have approved Regional Medical Continuing Education Centers
  • hospitals which have APA approved doctoral internship training programs
  • national, regional, or state professional associations, or divisions of such associations, which specifically offer or approve graduate or post-doctoral continuing education training
  • American Psychological Association (APA) approved sponsors and activities offered by APA (including home study courses)
  • activities sponsored by the Board of Examiners of Psychologists
  • activities sponsored by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals or its subordinate units and approved by the chief psychologist of the sponsoring state office

Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists: http://www.lsbep.org/

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2012 in General

 

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Florida Psychology License Renewal & Continuing Education

Florida psychologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of May 31, 2012.

Every licensee must complete 40 hours of approved continuing psychological education (CE) within the two year licensure period (biennium) including 2 hours on the prevention of medical errors, 3 hours on ethics and Florida laws, and 2 hours on domestic violence (every third renewal).

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of Psychology and Office of School Psychology (CE Broker Provider #50-1635 – courses are automatically reported to CE Broker). Florida psychologists may earn all 40 required hours @ pdresources.org.

Questions about CE Broker? Click here for answers to FAQs.

Preventing Medical ErrorsPreventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness of the types of errors that can occur within mental health practice, how such errors damage clients, and numerous ways they can be prevented. Its emphasis is on areas within mental health practice that carry the potential for “medical” errors. Examples include improper diagnosis, breach of confidentiality, failure to maintain accurate clinical records, failure to comply with mandatory abuse reporting laws, inadequate assessment of potential for violence, and the failure to detect medical conditions presenting as psychiatric disorders (or vice-versa). It includes detailed plans for error reduction and prevention like root cause analysis, habitual attention to patient safety, and ethical and legal guidelines. The course includes numerous cases illustrations to help demonstrate common and not-so-common behavioral health errors and specific practices that can help clinicians become proactive in preventing them. Course #20-10B | 2010 | 31 pages | 15 posttest questions
Ethics and Law in Florida PsychologyEthics & Law in Florida Psychology ensures that Florida-licensed psychologists are fully aware of the ethical and legal privileges and constraints under which they are licensed to practice in the State of Florida. It provides the opportunity for a comprehensive reading of the APA Code of Ethics and the three sets of statutes and rules governing the practice of psychology in Florida. Completing this course will fulfill the requirement that licensed psychologists in Florida complete each biennial renewal period three hours of continuing education on professional ethics and Florida Statutes and rules affecting the practice of psychology. Course #30-06 | 2012 | 40 pages | 21 posttest questions
domestic violenceDomestic Violence: Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence is intended to help health professionals maintain a high state of vigilance and to be well prepared with immediate and appropriate responses when abuse is disclosed. There is a special section on the complexity of an abuse victim’s decision about if and when to leave an abuser. This course will teach clinicians to detect abuse when they see it, screen for the particulars, and respond with definitive assistance in safety planning, community referrals, and individualized treatment plans. Course #20-61 | 2012 | 31 pages | 18 posttest questions
 
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Posted by on February 21, 2012 in General

 

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