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What is Your Sense of Purpose?

 

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Course excerpt from Motivation: Igniting the Process of Change

Tony Robbins often refers to himself as “The Why Guy.” The point Robbins makes, and has made a fortune promoting, is that why we do something matters more than how we do it. As Robbins says, There is a powerful driving force inside every human being that, once unleashed, can make any vision, dream, or desire a reality” (Robbins, 2017).

Sense of Purpose

Motivation relies on this driving force, and more specifically, the purpose behind it. Having a strong sense of purpose, as one study shows, doesn’t just drive motivation; it also drives health and longevity.

Looking to expand upon previous research that have suggested that finding a purpose in life lowers risk of mortality above and beyond other factors that are known to predict longevity, Patrick Hill of Carleton University in Canada and Nicholas Turiano of the University of Rochester Medical Center used nationally representative data available from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study to explore whether the benefits of purpose vary over time, such as across different developmental periods or after important life transitions.

The data included self-reported purpose in life (e.g., “Some people wander aimlessly through life, but I am not one of them”) and other psychosocial variables that gauged their positive relations with others and their experience of positive and negative emotions from over 6,000 participants.

At the 14-year follow-up period, a strong connection emerged: those participants who had died (569 in total) had reported lower purpose in life and fewer positive relations than did survivors. Conversely, greater purpose in life consistently predicted lower mortality risk across the lifespan, showing the same benefit for younger, middle-aged, and older participants across the follow-up period (Hill & Turiano, 2014).

“Our findings point to the fact that finding a direction for life, and setting overarching goals for what you want to achieve can help you actually live longer….So the earlier someone comes to a direction for life, the earlier these protective effects may be able to occur” (Hill, 2014).

While Hill and Turiano noted that there are many reasons to believe that a sense of purpose would have protective health effects in older adults, a surprising outcome was that it was just as important for younger and middles aged adults. Moreover, purpose had similar benefits for adults regardless of retirement status – a known mortality risk factor – and the longevity benefits of purpose in life held even after other indicators of psychological well-being, such as positive relations and positive emotions, were taken into account (Hill & Turiano, 2014). “These findings suggest that there’s something unique about finding a purpose that seems to be leading to greater longevity,” summarizes Hill (2014).

As a sense of purpose seems to act so salubriously in our lives, it makes sense that without it, we suffer.

For information on  factors that affect motivation, follow the link below:

Click here to learn more

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Learning Level: Intermediate

Course Type: Online

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

 
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Posted by on August 24, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Back To School Sale

Just $10 Per Credit!

Offers valid on future orders only. Have a coupon? Apply it at checkout for additional savings! Hurry, sale ends August 26, 2018.

      
Posted by Beth
CE Sale @pdresources.org

Let us help you with all of your Back To School CE Needs! With many courses to choose from, you are sure to find one ( or several) topics that will help you prepare for the upcoming year.

Don’t forget to look at our closeout courses too!

         

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

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Posted by on August 15, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Ohio Psychologists CE & Renewal Info

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Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Ohio psychologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of September 30, 2018.
23 hours of continuing education (CE) are required to renew, and must be completed by August 31, 2018.

Ohio Board of Psychology  
CE Required: 23 hours every 2 years
Online CE Allowed: No limit
License Expiration: 9/30, even years – CE due 8/31
National Accreditation Accepted: APA
Notes: 4 hours in ethics or cultural competency required each renewal
Date of Info: 8/10/2018

Ohio Psychologists Save 20% on CE

Ohio psychologists can earn all 23 hours required for renewal through online courses offered @pdresources.org. Over 100 courses available.

Click here to view APA-sponsored online CE courses.

PLEASE NOTE: ALL CE COURSES must be sent to OPA or OSPA for certification before the associations send the hours to the Board. This includes APA-approved courses. Unless you send CE certificates to OPA or OSPA, they will have no way of knowing that the course was completed! The Ohio State Board of Psychology does not accept CE certificates directly.

Course Directions

Our online courses provide instant access to the course materials and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Georgia OTs & CE Broker

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Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

Georgia-licensed Occupational Therapists (OTs) have a biennial license renewal deadline of March 31st of even-numbered years. Twenty four (24) hours of continuing education (CE) are required to renew, and effective April 1, 2018, all courses must be reported to CE Broker.

CE Broker

CE Broker is a continuing education tracking and management system used by accrediting organizations to electronically track CE compliance of licensees. The purpose is to ensure 100% compliance without having to perform audits. Licensees are unable to renew their licenses until they have met their CE requirements and posted the credits to CE Broker.

Georgia Board of OT 
CE Required: 24 hours every 2 years
Online CE Allowed: 12 hours (12 must be live)
License Expiration: 3/31, even years
National Accreditation Accepted: AOTA
Notes: 2 hrs in ethics of OT practice req’d each renewal. 14 hrs must relate to “hands on” patient care.
Date of Info: 7/26/2018

If a GA OT has not registered earned CE credits with CE Broker, the licensee must include all CE certificates of completion with the license renewal application or application for reinstatement.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation approved to sponsor online continuing education (CE) for GA OTs by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and reports all course completions to CE Broker.

Georgia OTs can earn up to 12 hours per renewal through online courses offered @pdresources.org. Over 90 online courses to choose from. Click here to view AOTA-approved online CEU courses.

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Posted by on August 10, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Christmas in July!

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CE Sale @pdresources.org

Enjoy $5 off every $25

With only a few hours to go, now is the time to stock up on any CE courses you need! Earn CE wherever YOU love to be and save $5 on every $25 you spend.

Have a coupon? Apply it at checkout for even greater savings.

Your instant savings will automatically apply at checkout based on your order total (after coupons). Max discount is $50 on orders $250 or more. Offer valid on future orders only. Sale ends tonight, Tuesday, July 31st at midnight!

APA Approved Courses:

APA-Approved Online CE for Psychologists
NBCC-Approved CE for Counselors & MFTs
ASHA-Approved Online CEUs for SLPs
AOTA-Approved Online CEUs for OTs
ASWB-Approved Online CE for Social Workers

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

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Posted by on July 31, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Personality and Temperament in Young Clients

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Course excerpt from Personality and Temperament: Connecting with Young Clients

The traits and tendencies that comprise one’s personality and temperament are inborn and enduring aspects of our functioning. Therefore, we can never alter or select an individual’s temperament or personality. However, we can strive to learn as much as possible about them so that we can deal with their behavior realistically. We may serve as guides for our clients by assisting them in understanding their attributes and traits. We should highlight their strengths and teach them the skills that they require to appropriately manage themselves.

The exercise below illustrates the importance of working with a child’s dominant traits (Sheedy Kurcinka, 2003, p. 36).

  • Write your name with your dominant hand.
  • Would you write a letter with this hand?
  • Now write your name with your non-dominant hand.
  • When you write your name with your dominant hand, how does it feel?
  • Would you write a letter with this hand?

When you use your dominant hand, you are more confident and willing to a complete a task. When you are asked to complete this exercise with your non-dominant hand, you are less confident or willing to write a letter or will not even consider trying.

It is the same with personality and temperament. When our clients are asked to perform activities in their non-preferred style (e.g., a child with high energy being asked to sit still all day, or a child with low energy being asked to be on the go the entire day), they will become frustrated, refuse to cooperate, or even throw tantrums.

As clinicians, we should strive to find ways to work with children’s preferred temperaments and personalities, to ensure the highest chance of success, cooperation, and motivation to learn.

A useful way of comprehending personality types is outlined in David Keirsey’s book Please Understand Me, written and published originally with Marilyn Bates in 1984 and reprinted in a number of iterations since that time. Keirsey based his work on that of several writers, including Carl Jung and Isabel Myers, with particular attention to the sixteen types described in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).

Keirsey (1998) condensed the sixteen MBTI types into four primary groups, which he equated with the following classical temperaments: Artisans, Guardians, Idealists, and Thinkers.

Let’s look at the first classical temperament:

Artisan

This type comprises 38% of the U.S. population (Keirsey, 1998, pp. 32-33).

Artisans have tremendous stamina and energy and don’t like being tied down. They are very creative with tools, can be artistic, they like to work with their hands. They have a hard time with authority and being told what to do. They are also fun-loving like to take risks and enjoy adventure and excitement. They constantly need variety, new projects to engage in, and can be impulsive and passionate. They often like to perform.

Children who are artisans will have a difficult time with authority and difficulty sitting quietly in school. They like to rock the boat. They will usually lead the merrymaking and pranks.

At school, they are motivated to work through fun activities, new adventures and working with their hands.

To help them understand themselves and manage their needs, we need to help them get in touch with their feelings:

  • “You wish there weren’t so many rules.”
  • “Sitting for a long time is hard for you.”

Motivators: In order to engage their cooperation in therapy, it is best to refrain from direct commands. Children with this personality type need to assert their independence. They are not afraid of authority and will actually enjoy a heated power struggle. These children like to know the rules so they can find ways to get around them. It is helpful to encourage them to help set the rules. This may increase their willingness to comply. These children love humor and fun and will respond well to imaginative activities. Therapy sessions with these children can be high energy with fun playground activities, contests and arts and crafts (Sheedy Kurcinka, 2015).

  • “Let’s pretend we are airplanes and fly back to the waiting room.”

These children need to be praised for their enthusiasm and creativity because they value that within themselves. They do not respond well to praise that highlights that they complied with the rules. That can actually backfire. Instead, we can say:

  • “I enjoyed our session today; I have fun being with you.”
  • “Thank you. Therapy was lively and exciting today.”

We can give them a new perspective of themselves, and let them know:

  • “You know how to make things fun while still making sure you are safe.”
  • “I have heard your jokes, but I also like your opinions on serious matters.  (Faber & Mazlish, 2012, p. 223)

Artisans might be cast into negative roles of’ ‘troublemaker’, or ‘rabble-rouser’.  It is helpful for us to view them in more positive ways, i.e., fun loving or as organizers and leaders (Faber & Mazlish, 2012, p. 223).

The Therapist Who is an Artisan:

  • May employ innovative, hands-on, and creative techniques.
  • Project a high-energy environment; hence, they should be mindful of children who are low energy.

The course Personality and Temperament: Connecting with Young Clients continues by describing the remaining major personality traits of Guardian, Idealist, and Thinker. The author goes on to look at each trait or tendency individually, discussing:

Triggers – Conflicts that arise when the client’s personality and temperament are being compromised

Skills to develop effective strategies to enhance therapy sessions

Vocabulary – Teach specific vocabulary to clients so they may “describe their emotional states” and request assistance or comfort. This will enable clients to manage their feelings and assist them to maintain their equilibrium in all situations (Bloomquist, 2013, pp.74-75).

For information on all of the personality types and tendencies, follow the link below:

Click here to learn more

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Learning Level: Introductory

Course Type: Online

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

 
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Posted by on July 17, 2018 in Mental Health

 

What are Executive Functioning Skills?

 

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Course excerpt from Executive Functioning in Adults

Adults are often relieved when they are told that they have difficulties with “executive functions.” It finally gives name to the frustrations associated with their perceived disorganization. It explains why they might always be late, unprepared, or in a perpetual search for their items such as keys, coat, and more serious things like important paperwork.

Executive functions relate to self-regulating skills that we employ every day in order to accomplish a task (e.g., getting dressed, eating breakfast, loading a backpack, and scheduling social engagements). They help us to plan, organize, make decisions, dynamically shift between situations or thoughts, control our emotions and impulsivity, and learn from past mistakes.

Dawson and Guare (2010) describe executive functioning skills as follows:

“Human beings have a built-in capacity to meet challenges and accomplish goals through the use of high-level cognitive functions called executive skills. These are the skills that help us to decide what activities or tasks we will pay attention to and which ones we will choose to do. Executive skills allow us to organize our behavior over time and override immediate demands in favor of longer-term goals. Through the use of these skills we can plan and organize activities, sustain attention, and persist to complete a task. Executive skills enable us to manage our emotions and our thoughts in order to work more efficiently and effectively. Simply stated, these skills help us to regulate our behavior. “(p.1)

Occasionally in this course, mention will be made of executive functioning deficits in children as well as in adults. The reason for this is that most adults with executive functioning deficits were once children with executive functioning deficits. In order to understand the etiology of these deficits in any individual, it is important to appreciate that:

  1. The skills needed for adult functioning were not learned in childhood.
  2. Adults with these deficits have been struggling for a long time.

A corollary of the second point is that many adults with executive functioning deficits may also suffer from other conditions that need therapeutic attention and which go beyond the strategies discussed in this course. Conditions, such as depression, anxiety, and ADHD, may be either the cause or the effect of the executive functioning difficulties.

Executive functioning difficulties cause young children and teens to struggle with many academic learning tasks. According to Howland (2010), executive functioning skills tend to predict academic success more effectively than any academic accomplishment or cognitive ability tests. Children with poor executive functioning skills are at high risk for dropping out of school and developing social and behavioral problems (Lindsay & Dockrell, 2012). They often lack listening skills and have difficulties with following directions, which can compromise familial relationships, and impede academic and social engagement. As a continuation of these same dynamics, adults with executive functioning difficulties may have trouble holding down jobs and experience poor relationships with friends, spouses, and children.

Difficulty with executive functioning is not necessarily considered a disability, yet it comprises a weakness in a key set of mental skills that assists with connecting past experiences with present actions. People use executive functions to perform activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to/remembering details, and managing time and space.

We use the executive functions in our brains to:

  • Make plans.
  • Keep track of time and finish work punctually.
  • Multitask and keep track of more than one thing simultaneously.
  • Meaningfully include past knowledge in discussions.
  • Evaluate ideas and reflect on our work.
  • Change our minds and make mid-course corrections while thinking, reading and writing.
  • Ask for help or seek more information when required.
  • Engage in group dynamics.
  • Wait our turn to speak.
  • Apply previously learned information to solve problem.
  • Analyze ideas.

Deficits in this area can impact any task, ranging from completing a homework assignment or getting dressed in the morning, to doing the laundry or grocery shopping.

Another way to understand executive functioning difficulties is to observe how the process is supposed to work in an individual with good executive functioning skills. Below is an example, which is segmented into six steps, as derived from Bhandari (2015):

  1. Consider a task to assess what needs to be done.
  2. Plan how to accomplish the task.
  3. Organize the task into a series of steps.
  4. Estimate the time that will be required to achieve the task, and set aside sufficient time.
  5. Adjust as required.
  6. Complete the task within the allotted time.

If one’s executive functions are working well, the brain may go through these steps in a matter of seconds. If one has weak executive skills, however, performing even a simple task can be quite challenging.

To read more about Executive Functioning Skills and to learn strategies and resources that can help, follow the link:

Click here to learn more

Executive Functioning in Adults is a 3-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that provides strategies to help adults overcome executive functioning deficits.

As human beings, we have a built-in capacity to accomplish goals and meet challenges through the use of high-level cognitive functions called “executive functioning” skills. These are the skills that help us to decide which activities and tasks we will pay attention to and which ones we will choose to ignore or postpone.

Executive skills allow us to organize our thinking and behavior over extended periods of time and override immediate demands in favor of longer-term goals. These skills are critical in planning and organizing activities, sustaining attention, and persisting until a task is completed. Individuals who do not have well developed executive functioning skills tend to have difficulty starting and attending to tasks, redirecting themselves when a plan is not working, and exercising emotional control and flexibility. This course offers a wide variety of strategies to help adults overcome such difficulties and function more effectively.

Course #31-08 | 2018 | 61 pages | 20 posttest questions

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Speech-Language Pathology CEUs | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE

Learning Level: Introductory

Course Type: Online

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Speech-Language Pathology CEUs | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2018 in Mental Health

 
 
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