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The Way We Talk About Mental Illness Needs To Change

By Erin Schumaker

Rethink Mental IllnessResearch by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy shows the loaded words used to describe drug addiction, such as “clean” vs. “dirty,” can actually drive people away from getting help, The Huffington Post reported in March.

The same is true of terminology used to describe mental illness, where phrases such as “unsuccessful suicide” can exacerbate rather than improve the dialogue surrounding suicide and depression.

Mental illness cuts across a wide swath of society. One in five Americans will experience a mental health issue in their lives, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and many say they feel stigmatized for their illness by friends, family, strangers and the media.

Because media reporting has a large impact on the public’s perception of mental illness and can be fraught with tough language choices, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) put together a rubric to help journalists write responsibility about mental illness and suicide. Click here to view.

“Words are very important,” Michelle Riba, MD, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Michigan Health System, told HuffPost. (Riba is also a former president of the APA, but did not have a hand in compiling the organization’s mental illness reporting guidelines.) “Let me just say that this is not just for reporters. I think this helps us all think about ways to talk about these issues and communicate.”

One of the most important changes that can be made when talking about mental illness is to stop labeling people as diseases. Instead of saying someone is a cancer patient or a schizophrenic, for example, the language should be “This is a person who has breast cancer” or “This person has schizophrenia.”

There’s a phrase for this type of humanizing sentence construction: people-first language, which Mental Health America describes as “speaking and writing in a way that acknowledges the person first, then the condition or disability.”

“It helps people understand that the person isn’t the disease, the person has the illness,” said Riba. “It doesn’t stigmatize the person — it gets to the point that the person has something that needs to be evaluated and treated.”

Riba also noted that the term “substance abuse” was dropped from the latest addition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which mental health professionals use to determine common language across the profession. The new terminology will be “substance use disorder.”

“Use of terms more in keeping with this medical malfunction, such as describing an affected person as an individual with, or suffering from, a ‘substance use disorder’ — as opposed to a ‘substance abuser’ — may decrease stigma and increase perceptions of a need for treatment,” John F. Kelly, associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, told HuffPost in March.

One way to frame conversations and reports about mental illness is to think critically about the goal of the conversation or report.

“The message that you’re trying to convey is often very important,” Riba said. “Then the words will follow.”

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/17/mental-illness-vocabulary_n_7078984.html?ir=Healthy%20Living&utm_campaign=041715&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Alert-healthy-living&utm_content=Title&ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

Professional Development Resources offers a variety of online continuing education (CE/CEU) courses for healthcare and mental health professionals that address the mental health needs of our communities. Click here to view.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Texas Psychologist Continuing Education Information

texas psychologists continuing education and license renewalsTexas Psychologists Continuing Education Requirements and License Renewals

Psychologist licensees in the state of Texas are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of professional development during each year they hold a license. The hours must be directly related to the practice of psychology.

 

There are no home study limits if APA approved. There is an annual birth month deadline for licensees.

 

Of these 20 hours, a minimum of 3 hours must be in the area(s) of ethics, Board Rules of Conduct, or professional responsibility. The Board’s policy on ethics hours may be accessed by clicking on the following link:Ethics Course Guidelines. Also, out of the 20 required hours, another 3 hours must be in the area of cultural diversity.

 

Psychology 
Texas Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Phone: 512-305-7700
CE Required: 20 hours per year
Home Study Allowed: No limit
License Expiration: Birthmonth, annually
National Accreditation Accepted: APA
Notes: CE hours must be directly related to the practice of psychology, 3 hrs ethics, board rules of conduct or professional responsibility req’d each renewal

Information obtained from the Texas Board of Examiners of Psychologists on April 16, 2015.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Continuing Education Courses for Psychologists: 

Constructive Clinical Supervision in Counseling and Psychotherapy is a 6-hour test-only CE course. This CE test is based on the book “Constructive Clinical Supervision in Counseling and Psychotherapy” (2015, 145 pages). The text articulates a practical, theoretical approach to supervision that integrates salient elements of a number of diverse but complementary theoretical perspectives from the fields of human development, psychotherapy, and clinical supervision to assist in facilitating supervisee growth and change from a constructivist framework. Constructive Clinical Supervision is written in a way that is highly accessible and inviting to supervisors who are new to constructivist ideas, while also offering sufficient theoretical depth and practical utility for those already well versed in constructivism. It is written for supervisors from all backgrounds, from beginning graduate students who are learning about supervision for the first time, to seasoned veterans who are exploring ways to deepen their clinical practice.

Helping Your Young Client Persevere in the Face of Learning Differences is a 3-hour online video CE course. Clinicians and teachers working with students struggling at grade level are committed to raising their students’ achievement potential by creating opportunities to learn. In order to accomplish this, they need to learn new techniques that can help encourage discouraged students – particularly those who have different ways of learning – by supporting and motivating them without enabling self-defeating habits. This course will provide strategies and techniques for helping students minimize the patterns of “learned helplessness” they have adopted, appreciate and maximize their strengths, develop a growth mindset, value effort and persistence over success, view mistakes as opportunities to learn, and develop a love of learning that will help them take personal responsibility for their school work. The course video is split into 3 parts for your convenience.

The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction is a 5-hour test-only CE course. This CE test is based on the book “The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction: A Guide to Coping with the Grief, Stress and Anger that Trigger Addictive Behaviors” (2012, 232 pages). This workbook presents a comprehensive approach to working with clients in recovery from addictive behaviors and is unique in that it addresses the underlying loss that clients have experienced that may be fueling addictive behaviors.  Counseling skills from the field of mindfulness therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and dialectical behavioral therapy are outlined in a clear and easy-to-implement style. Healthy strategies for coping with grief, depression, anxiety, and anger are provided along with ways to improve interpersonal relationships.
 
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Posted by on April 16, 2015 in CE Requirements, Psychology

 

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Gestational Diabetes Linked To Autism Risk

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Gestational Diabetes Linked To Autism Risk

Gestational Diabetes Linked To Autism Risk

A new study of more than 320,000 babies links autism to gestational diabetes.

The longitudinal study, conducted between 1995 and 2009 by researchers at Kaiser Permanente Southern California, found that children born to mothers who developed gestational diabetes before 26 weeks of pregnancy were at a 63 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. But after controlling for maternal age, education, ethnicity, household income, the child’s sex and the mother’s pre-existing conditions, that risk dropped to 42 percent.

While the overall rate of autism among study participants was 1 in 100 (mirroring national averages during the period of study), the rate of autism among children born to mothers with early pregnancy diabetes was 1 in 80.

Because this is a longitudinal association study, researchers were not able to establish a cause for the autism diagnosis. However, the associations were strong enough to warrant at least two health applications for expectant parents, according to study co-author Dr. Edward Curry.

For one, the study’s results emphasize the importance of early prenatal care. The women whose children were most at risk for developing autism were not women with previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes (who were already managing the condition with insulin, medication and diet). Nor were they women who got gestational diabetes after 26 weeks. Instead, the link between early gestational diabetes and an increased likelihood of autism diagnosis could mean that a fetus’ early exposure to uncontrolled high blood sugar may somehow affect brain development.

“We want to get mothers in early to make sure they’re on their vitamins, folic acid and that they check blood sugar to make sure it’s under control early on,” said Curry. “I think that’s the real takeaway message from this study.”

The second application, according to Curry, is for moms who know they were diagnosed with gestational diabetes before 26 weeks. These moms should remain extra vigilant about their baby’s developmental milestones. Are they making eye contact, babbling and pointing? Parents should also tell their child’s pediatrician about the gestational diabetes diagnosis, and ensure that pediatricians screen for autism appropriately at 12, 18 or 24 months old.

“We as pediatricians are supposed to be screening [by at least] 18 and 24 months, but it never hurts for the parents to have increased vigilance,” explained Curry. He also emphasized that his finding needs to be confirmed with more studies, as well as a few that can find out the causal link between gestational diabetes and autism, if there is one.

Dr. Annette Estes, the director of the University of Washington Autism Center, was not involved in Curry’s research but praised it for the large sample size, the length of time covered and the fact that the analysis controlled for multiple factors beyond gestational diabetes. The next step, said Estes, would be to do a prospective study, which looks forward in time by following pregnant moms, collecting data along their fetus’ growth and the child’s development. And, of course, the ultimate goal would be to figure out why there’s such a strong association between early gestational diabetes and the risk of autism diagnosis in children.

While scientists don’t know what exactly causes autism spectrum disorder, research to date suggests that a mix of genetic and environmental factors are at play. It’s known that autism tends to run in families and that having one child with autism increases the risk of subsequent siblings being diagnosed with the condition as well. Autism has also been linked in past studies to factors like air pollution, maternal obesity, periods of prenatal oxygen deprivation, exposure to pesticides and advanced parental age, according to the National Institutes of Health. The amount of preliminary research that’s out there right now can be confusing for parents and lay readers, explained Estes.

“The main factor that we are all in agreement is that genetics plays a major role in autism, but it doesn’t account for everything,” said Estes. “Once we get the genetics of autism a little more clear, then we can understand more about other risk factors; There’s going to be a number of risk factors, as we can see.”

“I think at this point, what parents can take away is that [autism research] is a science that’s in process,” she concluded.

Autism is a lifelong disorder that is characterized by lack of eye contact, communication delays, difficulty forming relationships and a preoccupation with niche subjects or objects. Other behaviors typical in people with autism include rocking one’s body, banging one’s head against a hard surface and flapping one’s hands, although the severity of the condition can vary from person to person, ranging from mild impairment to severe disability.

Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that currently, 1 in 68 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, and that the condition is about five times more common in boys.

Curry’s study was published online April 14 in JAMA.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/16/gestational-diabetes-autism_n_7073578.html?ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

Related Online Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Professionals:

Autism: The New Spectrum of Diagnostics, Treatment & Nutrition is a 4-hour online continuing education (CE/CEU) course that describes DSM-5 diagnostic changes, assessment, intervention models, dietary modifications, nutrition considerations and other theoretical interventions.

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence-Based Screening and Assessment is a 3-hour online CEU course that identifies DSM-5 diagnostic changes in the ASD diagnostic criteria, summarizes the empirically-based screening and assessment methodology in ASD and describes a comprehensive developmental approach for assessing students with ASD.

See more @ https://www.pdresources.org/searchlisting?search_input=autism&search_title=1

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Professional Development Resources maintains responsibility for all programs and content. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by theTexas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners.

 

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Continuing Education Information for California Speech Language Pathologists

california speech language pathologists continuing education informationCalifornia-licensed speech language pathologists have a license renewal every two years with a date of birth deadline. Twenty-four (24) continuing education hours are required every two years, and six (6) hours of home study are allowed if ASHA approved. Content must be directly relevant to practice.

Speech Language Pathology & Audiology 
California Speech Language & Audiologist Board
View the Board Website or Email the Board
Phone: 916-263-2666
CE Required: 24 hours every 2 years
Home Study Allowed: 6 hours if ASHA approved (self-study)
License Expiration: DOB, every 2 years
National Accreditation Accepted: ASHA
Notes: Content must directly relate to practice

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. See course page for number of ASHA CEUs, instructional level and content area. ASHA CE provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures. CEUs are awarded by the ASHA CE Registry upon receipt of the CEU Participant Form from the ASHA Approved CE Provider. Please note that the completion date that appears on ASHA transcripts is the last day of the quarter, regardless of when the course was completed.

Data gathered from the California Speech Language Pathology and Audiology and Hearing Aid Dispensers Board on April 13, 2015.

Original: California Speech Language Pathologists CE Requirements

 

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Continuing Education and License Renewal Information for Texas Marriage and Family Therapists

Texas Marriage and Family Therapists Continuing Education and License Renewal InformationA Texas Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) must complete 30 clock hours of continuing education relevant to Marriage and Family Therapy each renewal period.

A Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Associate (LMFT Associate) must complete 15 clock hours of continuing education each renewal period. Hours may not be carried over from one renewal period to the next renewal period.

Each licensee is responsible for maintaining documentation of his or her completed continuing education hours. Each licensee will report continuing education hours at the time of renewal.

Continuing education undertaken by a licensee shall be acceptable to the board under two circumstances:

  • if it is offered by a board-approved sponsor.
  • if it is provided by a board-approved provider of continuing education by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors, the Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners, or the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists, and it is relevant to the practice of marriage and family therapy.

Of the total Clock hours:

  • at least 6 hours must be in professional ethics (completion of the jurisprudence exam may count for 1 hour of ethics)
  • at least 3 hours must be in clinical supervision education, if the licensee is a board-approved supervisor.
  • no more than 12 hours every renewal period through completion of correspondence courses, satellite or distance learning, audio/video courses, and/or other learning formats of self study.
Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

Information obtained from the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists on April 15, 2015.

Continuing Education Courses for Marriage and Family Therapists: 

From Contention to Contemplation: Overcoming Core Impasses in Couples Therapy is a 1-hour online video CE course. Many couples come to therapy emotionally disconnected from each other, polarized by a constant state of struggle and unable to see past the last fight. Couples often engage in a repetitive cycle of interaction, resulting in their feeling stuck and hopeless. Once this reciprocal pattern can be identified, couples can be empowered to break the pattern and learn new ways of relating to one another that better satisfies their needs. The purpose of this course is to train therapists to conduct a strength-based assessment and identify those dynamics in a couple’s interaction that serve to perpetuate unsatisfactory relationship patterns. Therapeutic techniques discussed include diagramming a couple’s vulnerability cycle using pictorial representations and facilitating new patterns by identifying the partners’ beliefs and core premises and providing training in retroactive analysis of conflictual interactions.

Couples No-Fault Counseling is a 3-hour online CE course. Couples counseling is a challenging undertaking for both counselors and couples. Counselors need to take a detailed history of both partners and gradually discover the real reasons they overreact to certain things their partner says and does. Couples need to be motivated enough to keep counseling appointments and need to believe that they can improve their relationship. This course will share four interesting case studies, where you will witness couples who came to therapy for an identified problem and left with a much greater understanding of the underlying causes of their difficulties. The studies clearly reveal the reasons the partners were attracted to each other, and what they can learn from one another began in their childhoods. After taking this course, you will know how to help couples to give up their BAD (blame, argue & defend) communication style and replace it with active listening. In doing so, you will help them to create more harmonious relationships by increasing the empathy they feel for each other. By helping a couple who has children, you are making a positive difference in the couple’s lives, in the lives of their offspring and in the lives of countless unborn generations. The Couples No Fault Workbook, with twelve exercises to help couples begin their journey into greater self-awareness, is included at the end of this course.

The Challenge of Co-Parenting: Helping Split Couples to Raise Healthy Kids is a 2-hour online CE course. Parents who have chosen not to remain together as a couple are still responsible for the healthy upbringing of their mutual children. They must face not only the typical challenges of parenting, but also those unique tasks that come from living in separate homes. While therapists and other professionals have long worked with intact couples on parenting skills, they must now also be versed in teaching parents who live in separate homes how to establish healthy “co-parenting” abilities as well. This course will provide a basic understanding of the significant issues unique to children of split couples, and how to help co-parents address these issues while at the same time overcoming the common blocks that prevent them from working together in a healthy way.

Click Here to See More CE Courses for Marriage and Family Therapists…

Source: http://www.pdresources.org/blog_data/texas-marriage-and-family-therapists-continuing-education-requirements/

 
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Posted by on April 15, 2015 in General

 

California Occupational Therapists CE Requirements

california occupational therapists continuing educationCalifornia-licensed occupational therapists have a biennial license renewals with a birth date deadline. Twenty-four (24) PDU’s (hours) are required every two years for license renewal. There are no home study limits if AOTA approved, and half of the hours must directly relate to the delivery of occupational therapy services.

Occupational Therapy 
California Board of Occupational Therapists

View the Board Website or Email the Board
Phone: 916-263-2294
CE Required: 24 PDUs (hours) every 2 years
Home Study Allowed: No limit, must have cert.
License Expiration: DOB, every 2 years
National Accreditation Accepted: AOTA
Notes: Twelve hours must directly relate to OT service delivery 

Professional Development Resources is an AOTA Approved Provider of continuing education (#3159). OT Content Focus – Professional Issues: Legal, Legislative, Regulatory, & Reimbursement Issues & Contemporary Issues and Trends. This program is offered for 0.1 CEU. The assignment of AOTA CEU’s does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Professional Development Resources is also approved by the Florida Board of OT Practice (#34). Participant successfully completed the required assessment component for this activity.

Information gathered from the California Board of Occupational Therapy on April 13, 2015.

Original: License Renewals and Continuing Education for California Occupational Therapists

 
 

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Continuing Education Requirements for California Mental Health Professionals

california mental health professionals ce requirementsCalifornia mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and social workers have a license renewal every two years with a date of license issue deadline. Thirty-six (36) hours of continuing education are required for license renewal. There are no limits on home study if courses are done entirely online (course and test), and NBCC, APA, or ASWB approved. Six hours of laws and ethics are required at each renewal.

First Renewal Only:  MFT and SW- 7 hrs in detection and treatment of alcohol and other chemical substance dependency, and  7 hrs HIV

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); and the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625).

Continuing Education Courses for Mental Health Professionals: 

Helping Your Young Client Persevere in the Face of Learning Differences is a 3-hour online video CE course. Clinicians and teachers working with students struggling at grade level are committed to raising their students’ achievement potential by creating opportunities to learn. In order to accomplish this, they need to learn new techniques that can help encourage discouraged students – particularly those who have different ways of learning – by supporting and motivating them without enabling self-defeating habits. This course will provide strategies and techniques for helping students minimize the patterns of “learned helplessness” they have adopted, appreciate and maximize their strengths, develop a growth mindset, value effort and persistence over success, view mistakes as opportunities to learn, and develop a love of learning that will help them take personal responsibility for their school work. The course video is split into 3 parts for your convenience.

The Use of Humor in Therapy is a 2-hour online CE course. Should therapists and counselors use humor as a therapeutic technique? If so, should they be formally trained in those procedures before their implementation? This course will review the risks and benefits of using humor in therapy and the relevant historical controversies of this proposal. The paucity of rigorous empirical research on the effectiveness of this form of clinical intervention is exceeded only by the absence of any training for those practitioners interested in applying humor techniques. In this course a representative sample of its many advocates’ recommendations to incorporate humor in the practice of psychological therapies is reviewed. Therapeutic humor is defined, the role of therapists’ personal qualities is discussed, and possible reasons for the profession’s past resistance to promoting humor in therapy are described. Research perspectives for the evaluation of humor training are presented with illustrative examples of important empirical questions still needing to be answered.

Living a Better Life with Chronic Pain: Eliminating Self-Defeating Behaviors is a 5-hour online CE course. Certainly no one would choose a pain-filled body over a healthy, pain-free body. Yet every day, people unwittingly choose actions and attitudes that contribute to pain or lead to other less-than-desirable consequences on their health, relationships or ability to function. These actions and attitudes are what are called self-defeating behaviors (SDBs) and they keep us from living life to the fullest—if we let them. This course is a self-instructional module that “walks” readers through the process of replacing their self-defeating chronic pain issues with healthy, positive, and productive life-style behaviors. It progresses from an analysis of the emotional aspects of living with chronic pain to specific strategies for dealing more productively with it. Through 16 guided exercises, readers will learn how to identify their self-defeating behaviors (SDBs), analyze and understand them, and then replace them with life-giving actions that lead to permanent behavioral change.

Data obtained from the California Board of Behavioral Sciences on April 13, 2015.

Source: http://www.pdresources.org/blog_data/california-mental-health-continuing-education-and-license-information/

 

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