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Dealing with Aggression Online

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Course excerpt from Managing Anger & Aggressive Behavior

At the root of aggression is an anger system. Anger is an essential human feeling and emotion. It is likely that humans developed an anger system to protect and enforce our own interests against those of other people, other creatures and from environmental threats. Ironically if we did not have an anger system we would not, in all likelihood, maintain our social networks or improve them. Anger allows us to express our concern for one another. In expressing our anger we may incite another to respond with an apology or change in behavior and this in turn leads to the relationship improving and getting repaired. This happens with individuals, within families and communities and at the national and international level. Anger may lead to war and conflict but it also leads society to rectify or respond to social injustices.

Anger is activated by triggers. These triggers vary from person to person and by age, gender and culture. Women are often triggered by their close relationships. For instance, they may feel let down by family members and friends. According to studies conducted into anger and gender, men are more likely to be angered by objects not working correctly, encounters with strangers, and societal issues (Thomas, 2003). Children’s anger is most often roused when they are blocked from doing something they’ve set their minds on, such as when they throw a temper tantrum because their toys are taken away.

Anger, when it is emoted, encompasses everything from mild irritation to intense rage. When a cartoon character gets angry, steams comes out the ears. We say things like ‘That makes my blood boil!’ In real life the response varies from individual to individual, but typical indicators include grinding teeth, clenching fists, or going red and flushed. We may also go pale, experience numbness or muscle tensions, or get hot and clammy.

However, when anger turns into aggression, steps must be taken. Aggression, in general terms, is defined as harmful behavior which violates social conventions and which may include deliberate intent to harm or injure another person. These include overt aggression, passive aggression, covert aggression, verbal aggression and a newer, frequent, form of aggression; online aggression, which can be overt or passive in form. In this article, we will focus on dealing with online aggression.

Anonymity is one aspect behind aggressive online behavior. People are more aggressive and forthright online because they’re anonymous and can act unpleasantly without immediate consequence. Anonymity or operating undercover enables people to do things they wouldn’t ordinarily do. Online harassment is on the rise and the problem of cyber harassment has escalated in recent times. Some individuals, including politically prominent people and celebrities, have taken to naming and shaming and/or prosecuting those who are aggressive online.

Cyber-bullying, e-bullying, or trolling is intrusive and a form of psychological abuse. This type of bullying takes place through online forums, such as social networking sites, messaging apps, gaming sites, and in chat rooms such as Facebook, XBox Live, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat. Cyber harassment is the act of sending offensive, rude, and insulting messages and being abusive. It may involve:

  • Denigration – This is when someone sends information or shares photos about another person that is false, damaging and untrue for the purpose of ridiculing or spreading malicious rumors and gossip about them.
  • Flaming – This is when someone purposely uses extreme and offensive language and gets into online arguments and fights. They do this to cause reactions and they enjoy the fact it causes someone distress.
  • Impersonation – This is when someone hacks into another person’s email or social networking account and uses that person’s online identity to send or post vicious or embarrassing material to and about others.
  • Outing and Trickery – This is when someone tricks a person into revealing secrets about themselves, then forwards these and other personal information to third parties. They may also do this with private images and videos. This can take the form of doxing (sometimes written as doxxing). The term derives from an alteration of the abbreviation “docs” (for “documents”) and is an activity in which someone openly reveals and publicizes information about an individual for revenge via the violation of privacy.
  • Cyber Stalking – This is an act of harassment in which the stalker repeatedly sends intimidating messages, which may include threats of harm, or engages in other online activities that make a person afraid for his or her safety.
  • Exclusion – This is when others intentionally leave someone out of a group such as group messages, online apps, gaming sites, and other online engagement. This is a form of social mistreatment.
  • Doxing – This is a controversial issue, as it highlights the conflicts surrounding freedom of information. For example, the internet-based group of hacktivists, Anonymous, became known for a series of well-publicized stunts and for Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks on government and corporate websites. They make frequent use of doxing, as do related groups like AntiSec and LulzSec; the latter came to international prominence after hacking the websites of the Public Broadcasting Service, Sony, and the United States Senate. These groups claim that they aim to protest government censorship and monitoring of the internet. Supporters call members of these groups “freedom fighters” and digital Robin Hoods, while critics describe them as “cyber lynch-mobs” or “cyber terrorists.”

Tips for Dealing with Aggression Online

As soon as you determine that you are being harassed by someone, tell that person in clear terms to stop contacting you and leave it there. You do not need to explain why, just state that you do not want the person to contact you. Keep a record of the messages. A normal initial reaction upon receiving harassing emails or messages is to delete the communications. However, it is important to save every communication you have with the harasser. If you receive phone calls from the harasser, your local phone company can help trace them. Do not destroy any evidence and, as soon as you can, turn the evidence over to the police.

Complain to the Appropriate Parties – It can at times be a little difficult for people to determine who the appropriate party is. If you’re harassed in a chat room, contact whoever runs the server being used. If you’re harassed on any kind of instant messaging service, read the terms of service and harassment policies provided, and use any contact address given there. If someone has created a website to harass you, complain to the server on which the site is hosted. If you’re being harassed via email, complain to the email service (like Hotmail) used to send the messages.

Holding the Harasser to Account – If the circumstances and behavior of the harasser are threatening to your safety and wellbeing, report the harasser to the police. However online communication is nearly impossible to effectively monitor, and could have dire consequences for freedom of speech. The best way to deal with online negative and aggressive behavior is to refuse to engage with it. If, as a collective body, we refuse to respond or engage with aggressive online behavior then we have a better chance of making it socially unacceptable. Therefore, we each need to do our individual bit online to assert prosocial communication over antisocial forms.

For information on  the difference between anger and aggression and to learn more about the different types of aggression, follow the link below:

Click here to learn more

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE |  School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Learning Level: Introductory

Course Type: Online

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159);  the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE |  School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2018 in Mental Health

 

What is Your Sense of Purpose?

 

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Course excerpt from Motivation: Igniting the Process of Change

Tony Robbins often refers to himself as “The Why Guy.” The point Robbins makes, and has made a fortune promoting, is that why we do something matters more than how we do it. As Robbins says, There is a powerful driving force inside every human being that, once unleashed, can make any vision, dream, or desire a reality” (Robbins, 2017).

Sense of Purpose

Motivation relies on this driving force, and more specifically, the purpose behind it. Having a strong sense of purpose, as one study shows, doesn’t just drive motivation; it also drives health and longevity.

Looking to expand upon previous research that have suggested that finding a purpose in life lowers risk of mortality above and beyond other factors that are known to predict longevity, Patrick Hill of Carleton University in Canada and Nicholas Turiano of the University of Rochester Medical Center used nationally representative data available from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study to explore whether the benefits of purpose vary over time, such as across different developmental periods or after important life transitions.

The data included self-reported purpose in life (e.g., “Some people wander aimlessly through life, but I am not one of them”) and other psychosocial variables that gauged their positive relations with others and their experience of positive and negative emotions from over 6,000 participants.

At the 14-year follow-up period, a strong connection emerged: those participants who had died (569 in total) had reported lower purpose in life and fewer positive relations than did survivors. Conversely, greater purpose in life consistently predicted lower mortality risk across the lifespan, showing the same benefit for younger, middle-aged, and older participants across the follow-up period (Hill & Turiano, 2014).

“Our findings point to the fact that finding a direction for life, and setting overarching goals for what you want to achieve can help you actually live longer….So the earlier someone comes to a direction for life, the earlier these protective effects may be able to occur” (Hill, 2014).

While Hill and Turiano noted that there are many reasons to believe that a sense of purpose would have protective health effects in older adults, a surprising outcome was that it was just as important for younger and middles aged adults. Moreover, purpose had similar benefits for adults regardless of retirement status – a known mortality risk factor – and the longevity benefits of purpose in life held even after other indicators of psychological well-being, such as positive relations and positive emotions, were taken into account (Hill & Turiano, 2014). “These findings suggest that there’s something unique about finding a purpose that seems to be leading to greater longevity,” summarizes Hill (2014).

As a sense of purpose seems to act so salubriously in our lives, it makes sense that without it, we suffer.

For information on  factors that affect motivation, follow the link below:

Click here to learn more

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Learning Level: Intermediate

Course Type: Online

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

 
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Posted by on August 24, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Back To School Sale

Just $10 Per Credit!

Offers valid on future orders only. Have a coupon? Apply it at checkout for additional savings! Hurry, sale ends August 26, 2018.

      
Posted by Beth
CE Sale @pdresources.org

Let us help you with all of your Back To School CE Needs! With many courses to choose from, you are sure to find one ( or several) topics that will help you prepare for the upcoming year.

Don’t forget to look at our closeout courses too!

         

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

 

 
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Posted by on August 15, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Ohio Psychologists CE & Renewal Info

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Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

Ohio psychologists have an upcoming license renewal deadline of September 30, 2018.
23 hours of continuing education (CE) are required to renew, and must be completed by August 31, 2018.

Ohio Board of Psychology  
CE Required: 23 hours every 2 years
Online CE Allowed: No limit
License Expiration: 9/30, even years – CE due 8/31
National Accreditation Accepted: APA
Notes: 4 hours in ethics or cultural competency required each renewal
Date of Info: 8/10/2018

Ohio Psychologists Save 20% on CE

Ohio psychologists can earn all 23 hours required for renewal through online courses offered @pdresources.org. Over 100 courses available.

Click here to view APA-sponsored online CE courses.

PLEASE NOTE: ALL CE COURSES must be sent to OPA or OSPA for certification before the associations send the hours to the Board. This includes APA-approved courses. Unless you send CE certificates to OPA or OSPA, they will have no way of knowing that the course was completed! The Ohio State Board of Psychology does not accept CE certificates directly.

Course Directions

Our online courses provide instant access to the course materials and CE test. Successful completion of the online CE test (80% required to pass, 3 chances to take) and course evaluation are required to earn a certificate of completion. Click here to learn more. Have a question? Contact us. We’re here to help!

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Georgia OTs & CE Broker

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Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

Georgia-licensed Occupational Therapists (OTs) have a biennial license renewal deadline of March 31st of even-numbered years. Twenty four (24) hours of continuing education (CE) are required to renew, and effective April 1, 2018, all courses must be reported to CE Broker.

CE Broker

CE Broker is a continuing education tracking and management system used by accrediting organizations to electronically track CE compliance of licensees. The purpose is to ensure 100% compliance without having to perform audits. Licensees are unable to renew their licenses until they have met their CE requirements and posted the credits to CE Broker.

Georgia Board of OT 
CE Required: 24 hours every 2 years
Online CE Allowed: 12 hours (12 must be live)
License Expiration: 3/31, even years
National Accreditation Accepted: AOTA
Notes: 2 hrs in ethics of OT practice req’d each renewal. 14 hrs must relate to “hands on” patient care.
Date of Info: 7/26/2018

If a GA OT has not registered earned CE credits with CE Broker, the licensee must include all CE certificates of completion with the license renewal application or application for reinstatement.

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation approved to sponsor online continuing education (CE) for GA OTs by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and reports all course completions to CE Broker.

Georgia OTs can earn up to 12 hours per renewal through online courses offered @pdresources.org. Over 90 online courses to choose from. Click here to view AOTA-approved online CEU courses.

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Christmas in July!

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CE Sale @pdresources.org

Enjoy $5 off every $25

With only a few hours to go, now is the time to stock up on any CE courses you need! Earn CE wherever YOU love to be and save $5 on every $25 you spend.

Have a coupon? Apply it at checkout for even greater savings.

Your instant savings will automatically apply at checkout based on your order total (after coupons). Max discount is $50 on orders $250 or more. Offer valid on future orders only. Sale ends tonight, Tuesday, July 31st at midnight!

APA Approved Courses:

APA-Approved Online CE for Psychologists
NBCC-Approved CE for Counselors & MFTs
ASHA-Approved Online CEUs for SLPs
AOTA-Approved Online CEUs for OTs
ASWB-Approved Online CE for Social Workers

Professional Development Resources is a nonprofit educational corporation 501(c)(3) organized in 1992. We are approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board and Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners; and are CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: PsychologistsCounselorsSocial WorkersMarriage & Family Therapist (MFTs)Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)Occupational Therapists (OTs)Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs)School Psychologists, and Teachers

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 
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Posted by on July 31, 2018 in Mental Health

 

Personality and Temperament in Young Clients

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Course excerpt from Personality and Temperament: Connecting with Young Clients

The traits and tendencies that comprise one’s personality and temperament are inborn and enduring aspects of our functioning. Therefore, we can never alter or select an individual’s temperament or personality. However, we can strive to learn as much as possible about them so that we can deal with their behavior realistically. We may serve as guides for our clients by assisting them in understanding their attributes and traits. We should highlight their strengths and teach them the skills that they require to appropriately manage themselves.

The exercise below illustrates the importance of working with a child’s dominant traits (Sheedy Kurcinka, 2003, p. 36).

  • Write your name with your dominant hand.
  • Would you write a letter with this hand?
  • Now write your name with your non-dominant hand.
  • When you write your name with your dominant hand, how does it feel?
  • Would you write a letter with this hand?

When you use your dominant hand, you are more confident and willing to a complete a task. When you are asked to complete this exercise with your non-dominant hand, you are less confident or willing to write a letter or will not even consider trying.

It is the same with personality and temperament. When our clients are asked to perform activities in their non-preferred style (e.g., a child with high energy being asked to sit still all day, or a child with low energy being asked to be on the go the entire day), they will become frustrated, refuse to cooperate, or even throw tantrums.

As clinicians, we should strive to find ways to work with children’s preferred temperaments and personalities, to ensure the highest chance of success, cooperation, and motivation to learn.

A useful way of comprehending personality types is outlined in David Keirsey’s book Please Understand Me, written and published originally with Marilyn Bates in 1984 and reprinted in a number of iterations since that time. Keirsey based his work on that of several writers, including Carl Jung and Isabel Myers, with particular attention to the sixteen types described in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).

Keirsey (1998) condensed the sixteen MBTI types into four primary groups, which he equated with the following classical temperaments: Artisans, Guardians, Idealists, and Thinkers.

Let’s look at the first classical temperament:

Artisan

This type comprises 38% of the U.S. population (Keirsey, 1998, pp. 32-33).

Artisans have tremendous stamina and energy and don’t like being tied down. They are very creative with tools, can be artistic, they like to work with their hands. They have a hard time with authority and being told what to do. They are also fun-loving like to take risks and enjoy adventure and excitement. They constantly need variety, new projects to engage in, and can be impulsive and passionate. They often like to perform.

Children who are artisans will have a difficult time with authority and difficulty sitting quietly in school. They like to rock the boat. They will usually lead the merrymaking and pranks.

At school, they are motivated to work through fun activities, new adventures and working with their hands.

To help them understand themselves and manage their needs, we need to help them get in touch with their feelings:

  • “You wish there weren’t so many rules.”
  • “Sitting for a long time is hard for you.”

Motivators: In order to engage their cooperation in therapy, it is best to refrain from direct commands. Children with this personality type need to assert their independence. They are not afraid of authority and will actually enjoy a heated power struggle. These children like to know the rules so they can find ways to get around them. It is helpful to encourage them to help set the rules. This may increase their willingness to comply. These children love humor and fun and will respond well to imaginative activities. Therapy sessions with these children can be high energy with fun playground activities, contests and arts and crafts (Sheedy Kurcinka, 2015).

  • “Let’s pretend we are airplanes and fly back to the waiting room.”

These children need to be praised for their enthusiasm and creativity because they value that within themselves. They do not respond well to praise that highlights that they complied with the rules. That can actually backfire. Instead, we can say:

  • “I enjoyed our session today; I have fun being with you.”
  • “Thank you. Therapy was lively and exciting today.”

We can give them a new perspective of themselves, and let them know:

  • “You know how to make things fun while still making sure you are safe.”
  • “I have heard your jokes, but I also like your opinions on serious matters.  (Faber & Mazlish, 2012, p. 223)

Artisans might be cast into negative roles of’ ‘troublemaker’, or ‘rabble-rouser’.  It is helpful for us to view them in more positive ways, i.e., fun loving or as organizers and leaders (Faber & Mazlish, 2012, p. 223).

The Therapist Who is an Artisan:

  • May employ innovative, hands-on, and creative techniques.
  • Project a high-energy environment; hence, they should be mindful of children who are low energy.

The course Personality and Temperament: Connecting with Young Clients continues by describing the remaining major personality traits of Guardian, Idealist, and Thinker. The author goes on to look at each trait or tendency individually, discussing:

Triggers – Conflicts that arise when the client’s personality and temperament are being compromised

Skills to develop effective strategies to enhance therapy sessions

Vocabulary – Teach specific vocabulary to clients so they may “describe their emotional states” and request assistance or comfort. This will enable clients to manage their feelings and assist them to maintain their equilibrium in all situations (Bloomquist, 2013, pp.74-75).

For information on all of the personality types and tendencies, follow the link below:

Click here to learn more

CE Credit: 3 Hours

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Learning Level: Introductory

Course Type: Online

Professional Development Resources is approved to sponsor continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); the Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678); and is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within a few days of completion).

Target Audience: Psychology CE | Counseling CE | Social Work CE | Occupational Therapy CEUs | Marriage & Family Therapy CE | Nutrition & Dietetics CE | School Psychology CE | Teaching CE

Earn CE Wherever YOU Love to Be!

 

 
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Posted by on July 17, 2018 in Mental Health

 
 
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