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Illinois Speech Language Therapists Continuing Education Requirements

Illinois Speech Language Therapists Continuing Education Requirements

Illinois-licensed speech language pathologists have a biennial license renewal with a deadline of October 31st, odd years.

Twenty hours of continuing education are required for license renewal, and there are no limits for online CE courses if ASHA approved.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. See course page for number of ASHA CEUs, instructional level and content area. ASHA CE provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures. CEUs are awarded by the ASHA CE Registry upon receipt of the CEU Participant Form from the ASHA Approved CE Provider. Please note that the completion date that appears on ASHA transcripts is the last day of the quarter, regardless of when the course was completed.

Continuing Education Courses for Speech Language Pathologists

Healthy professional and personal relationships rely heavily on effective communication techniques and respectful conversational skills. Clinicians and other professionals who work with children and their families can benefit from adding to their repertoire by learning communication techniques that improve the quality of these relationships. The correct use of language can increase your young clients’ self-esteem, motivate children to learn, engage their willing cooperation, defuse power struggles, and teach conflict resolution skills. With this information, you will also be better prepared to manage difficult conversations. The purpose of this course is to teach clinicians effective and practical communication and conversational skills to use in the classroom and in one-on-one situations with young clients and their families.Course #30-79 | 2015 | 52 pages | 21 posttest questions
As the population of the United States ages, more healthcare professionals find themselves treating elders. Schools, private practice, and hospitals will always be major practice settings, but the demographics of our country point to a growing need for geriatric treatment. In 2014 there were an estimated 1.5 million people in 16,000 skilled nursing facilities. By 2030 this number may be as high as 2.6 million. There is a significant need now for treatment provided by speech-language pathologists in the skilled nursing facility setting which will only grow in the years to come.Every practice setting has unique characteristics that affect clinical practice. Skilled nursing facilities have a multitude of regulations, complicated billing practices, and a culture of care that must be learned and integrated into the SLP’s treatment habits. This can make it difficult for the SLP working part-time or PRN in a skilled nursing facility. This course will provide a framework for providing care in a skilled nursing facility. It is intended to give the SLP an overview of the important aspects of long-term care that affect treatment. The average resident and common treatment areas will also be discussed.Course #20-91 | 2015 | 27 pages | 14 posttest questions
This is a test only course (book not included). The book (or e-book) can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.This CE test is based on the book “Early Childhood Music Therapy and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Developing Potential in Young Children and their Families” (2012, 304 pages). This text includes the work of many researchers and practitioners from music therapy and related disciplines brought together to provide a comprehensive overview of music therapy practice with young children who present with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The authors present an overview of ASD including core characteristics, early warning signs, prevalence rates, research and theories, screening and evaluation. The book explores treatment approaches and strategies as applied in music therapy to the treatment of ASD. The authors present a wealth of practical applications and strategies for implementation of music therapy within multi-disciplinary teams, school environments and in family-centered practice.Course #60-97 | 42 posttest questions

Professional Development Resources is approved by the Continuing Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM) to provide continuing education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. See course page for number of ASHA CEUs, instructional level and content area. ASHA CE provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures. CEUs are awarded by the ASHA CE Registry upon receipt of the CEU Participant Form from the ASHA Approved CE Provider. Please note that the completion date that appears on ASHA transcripts is the last day of the quarter, regardless of when the course was completed.

 

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A New Theory on Why Neurotics Are Creative

@mstanyabasu

A wandering mind might explain why creative leaders tend to be neurotic.

Adam Perkins is a psychologist and a self-proclaimed neurotic, contemplating things to the point of obsession. He can get anxious about things that might seem mundane to another person. And he’s admittedly quite sensitive.

Perkins also has a new theory, described in a piece published Thursday in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, about why he and many others like him channel their neuroticism into creativity and problem solving. He argues it comes from how certain people daydream.

Neuroticism and creative thinking have long been correlated: some of history’s more exciting minds, from Isaac Asimov to Winston Churchill to Woody Allen, have been famously anxious with a tendency to brood. The trait is also often associated with being risk-averse; neurotic people are often considered “threat sensitive,” a classification that the psychologist Jeffrey Gray first pinpointed while developing a test that predicted a person’s tendency to be neurotic. Gray’s test showed that high scorers on the neuroticism test tended to avoid “dangerous” jobs, preferring occupations that kept them out of harm’s way—hence the association with more analytical jobs, which require creative problem solving, as opposed to physical ones.

But Gray’s analysis seemed simplistic, Perkins says. “Why should having a magnified view of threat make you good at coming up with solutions to difficult problems?” he tells TIME. “It doesn’t add up. On one hand, it’s a clever theory—it shows the difficulty of holding down a dangerous job, for example—but on the other hand, it doesn’t explain why [neurotic people] tend to feel unhappy or why they’re more creative.”

Perkins had an epiphany when he attended co-author Jonathan Smallwood’s lecture on mind wandering. Smallwood, an expert who studies the neuroscience of daydreaming, was describing self-generated thought and its origins in the brain’s medial prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain that has been linked with memories and recall.

“He started describing how people whose minds wander are better at things like creativity, delaying gratification and planning. He also talked about the way that daydreamers’ minds wander when they’re feeling kind of blue,” Perkins says. “And my ears perked up.”

Smallwood had run a series of tests on volunteers, where he’d put them through an MRI scanner with no instructions. Naturally, the volunteers began daydreaming. Those with negative thoughts would display greater activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. “If you have a high level of activity in this particular brain area, then your mind wandering tends to be threat-related,” he says.

That’s what happens in the brains of neurotic people when their minds wander.

And of course, no surprise, the longer one dwells on a problem, unwilling to let it go, the more likely they are to come up with a solution—making that a potential upside to neurotic daydreaming.

“There’s costs and benefits to being a neurotic,” Perkins says. “What’s interesting is that you can be neurotic and have a creative benefit, but we still don’t understand it.”

Source: http://time.com/4011917/neuroticism-creativity-daydreaming/?xid=tcoshare

 
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Posted by on August 28, 2015 in General

 

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Back to School CE Specials at PDResources

Back to School CE Sale Ends Monday - Hurry and Save at PDResources!

There are only 3 days left to save up to 50% on your Back to School CEUs. With 3 years to complete for credit, why not stock up and save?

For our Florida friends tracking #Erika, here are tips to prepare and make your home hurricane-ready. We are monitoring in Jax. Our thoughts are with #Dominica.

 

Back to School CE Sale – There are only 3 days left to save up to 50% on your Back to School CEUs.

Online Courses: Provide instant access to the course materials (pdf download) and the CE test (to mark your answers on while reading). These courses are text-based so you can print or simply view on screen.

 

Healthy professional and personal relationships rely heavily on effective communication techniques and respectful conversational skills. Clinicians and other professionals who work with children and their families can benefit from adding to their repertoire by learning communication techniques that improve the quality of these relationships. The correct use of language can increase your young clients’ self-esteem, motivate children to learn, engage their willing cooperation, defuse power struggles, and teach conflict resolution skills. With this information, you will also be better prepared to manage difficult conversations. The purpose of this course is to teach clinicians effective and practical communication and conversational skills to use in the classroom and in one-on-one situations with young clients and their families.Course #30-79 | 2015 | 52 pages | 21 posttest questions

 

It has long been observed that there are certain children who experience better outcomes than others who are subjected to similar adversities, and a significant amount of literature has been devoted to the question of why this disparity exists. Research has largely focused on what has been termed “resilience.” Health professionals are treating an increasing number of children who have difficulty coping with 21st century everyday life. Issues that are hard to deal with include excessive pressure to succeed in school, bullying, divorce, or even abuse at home. This course provides a working definition of resilience and descriptions of the characteristics that may be associated with better outcomes for children who confront adversity in their lives. It also identifies particular groups of children – most notably those with developmental challenges and learning disabilities – who are most likely to benefit from resilience training. The bulk of the course – presented in two sections – offers a wide variety of resilience interventions that can be used in therapy, school, and home settings.Course #30-72 | 2014 | 53 pages | 21 posttest questions

 

This introductory course, from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), describes the symptoms and treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents. All parents can relate to the many changes their children go through as they grow up. But sometimes it’s hard to tell if a child is just going through a “phase,” or showing signs of something more serious. In the last decade, the number of children receiving the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, sometimes, called manic-depressive illness, has grown substantially. But what does the diagnosis really mean for a child? This course discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens, including signs and symptoms, differences between child/adolescent and adult BPD, diagnostic types, medications for BPD (along with their individual cautions), and other therapies.Course #10-68 | 2012 | 24 pages | 10 posttest questions

 

Clinicians and teachers working with students struggling at grade level are committed to raising their students’ achievement potential by creating opportunities to learn. In order to accomplish this, they need to learn new techniques that can help encourage discouraged students – particularly those who have different ways of learning – by supporting and motivating them without enabling self-defeating habits. This course will provide strategies and techniques for helping students minimize the patterns of “learned helplessness” they have adopted, appreciate and maximize their strengths, develop a growth mindset, value effort and persistence over success, view mistakes as opportunities to learn, and develop a love of learning that will help them take personal responsibility for their school work. The course video is split into 3 parts for your convenience.Course #30-75 | 2014 | 21 posttest questions

 

Temperament plays a significant role in a child’s development, experience, relationships, and behaviors. Children often need supportive intervention to allow them to function in healthy ways and reach their potential. This video course will include a discussion of normal early childhood development and the range of normal functioning as it is impacted by temperament. The purpose of this course is to help participants understand the role that temperament plays in the trajectory of normal child development including inner experience, relationships, and behavior and learn effective, supportive interventions. It is intended for all types of therapists who work with children or their parents, as well as for school-based personnel and classroom teachers.

 

This is a test only course (book not included). The book can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.This CE test is based on the book “Apps for Autism” (2015, 436 pages), the ultimate app planner guidebook for parents/professionals addressing autism intervention. There are hundreds of apps for autism, and this course will guide you through them so that you can confidently utilize today’s technology to maximize your child or student’s success. Speech-language pathologist Lois Jean Brady wrote this book to educate parents and professionals about the breakthrough method she calls “iTherapy” – which is the use of mobile technology and apps in meeting students’ individual educational goals.For those who are new to the wonderful world of apps, worry not! This award winning reference will review hundreds of excellent apps, accessories and features organized into 39 chapters for parents and professionals alike. There are also helpful sections of how to choose apps, evidence-based practices, choosing an iDevice, internet safety, a helpful toolbox and much, much more.Course #30-82 | 2015 | 21 posttest questions

 

Sale ends August 31, 2015.

Offers valid on future orders only.

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy, Psychology & School Psychology, Dietetics & Nutrition, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice; the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board; the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs; and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists and State Board of Social Worker Examiners. Professional Development Resources is CE Broker compliant (all courses are reported within one week of completion).

 

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Getting Out of Your Own Way Can Be Easier Than You Might Think

Sometimes, some of the most profound life improvements come from simple changes. As the saying goes, what you’re looking for might be right in front of you.

There is indeed plenty of value in adding life skills. In therapy, people can learn how to overcome obstacles and improve relationships. However, the main reason I practice solution-focused therapy is it never neglects the strengths and skills a person already possesses.

“But I’m coming to therapy because my strengths and skills aren’t working,” you might protest. “I’ve tried everything I can to fix my situation and I’m stuck in the same place.” Perhaps, but overcoming depression, anxiety, or relationship problems can take a lot of work. It is usually a combination of both significant new skills and small, simple tweaks that effects lasting change. So in order to concentrate on these adjustments, it helps to get out of your own way.

What does it look like to get out of your own way? Start noticing the wonderful, quirky things that make you uniquely you, and start going with them instead of against them.

Maybe you are cranky in the morning, quick to snap at your partner, before you’ve had your coffee. Perhaps you are prone to eating a carton of ice cream in one sitting, which makes you feel bad. Or you might have noticed that you tend to spend all of your money when you go out with a certain friend, which makes you feel guilty.

Are these problems? Not necessarily. But if you are constantly fighting yourself over such situations, or feeling guilty about their outcomes, they can get in your way.

To get out of your own way, accept that, for now—to use the above examples—you need to make coffee as soon as you get up, not keep ice cream in the house, and bring only as much cash as you are comfortable spending when you hang out with your friend.

These are simple changes, but many people disregard the power of simple changes. We have unrealistic expectations of our own willpower, when our willpower isn’t really the issue; the issue is that we haven’t accepted ourselves or opted to work with our vulnerabilities.

It takes a good therapist to help a person decide if a problem is one he or she should address with change or bypass with acceptance. For example, therapy can help increase willpower by teaching cognitive therapy skills.

But it also might not be in a person’s best interest to use these skills in every area. Maybe it’s just not a big deal to not buy ice cream anymore. Or maybe it’s not worth feeling bad about eating it all when we do have it.

Seeking professional help can be so important. A therapist will listen carefully to the way a person talks about his or her goals and problems, and pay attention to how the person uses the resources the therapist provides. Some people can benefit from adding tools to their self-care routine. Others sometimes need someone to point out that if they go with their tendencies, they can free up a lot of energy for other things. Even telling ourselves that we are going to postpone working on a problem, or “bookmark” it for later, can make a recurring issue subside.

Life has real complications, and it requires our best effort more often than not. Make it easier for yourself by taking away some of the “shoulds” and embracing more of who you are. If you know you hate going to the gym, don’t buy a membership; choose something else instead. If you are prone to being affected by the nightly news, don’t watch it before bedtime; it will be there in the morning. If you forget about voicemails after listening to them and fail to call people back, listen to voicemails only when you are able to return them.

These are simple solutions, or “hacks,” for unique problems.

Can you think of some opportunities to get out of your own way so you can focus on more important stuff?

© Copyright 2015 by Lindsey Antin, MA, MFT, therapist in Berkeley, CA. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/getting-out-of-your-own-way-may-be-simpler-than-you-think-0826154

Popular CE Courses for Mental Health

Self-defeating behaviors are negative on-going patterns of behaviors involving issues such as smoking, weight, inactive lifestyle, depression, anger, perfectionism, etc. This course is designed to teach concepts to eliminate these negative patterns. The course is educational: first you learn the model, then you apply it to a specific self-defeating behavior. A positive behavioral change is the outcome. Following the course, participants will be able to identify, analyze and replace their self-defeating behavior(s) with positive behavior(s). The course also provides an excellent psychological “tool” for clinicians to use with their clients. The author grants limited permission to photocopy forms and exercises included in this course for clinical use. Closeout Course #40-08 | 2007 | 44 pages | 35 posttest questions
The breath is intrinsically linked to the nervous system and has a powerful effect on both the mind and body, yet has been largely overlooked as a mechanism of change within medicine and mental health. This course is based on an audio book by Andrew Weil, MD, Breathing: The Master Key to Self-Healing (1999), in which he describes the physiological mechanisms by which the breath affects the mind and body. After an introductory lecture, he teaches several calming, relaxing breathing techniques, as well as an energizing breathing technique. This audio book is a valuable resource for therapists and medical professionals to learn these techniques and to use with clients.
This course will give you the mindfulness skills necessary to work directly, effectively and courageously, with your own and your client’s life struggles. Compassion towards others starts with compassion towards self. Practicing mindfulness cultivates our ability to pay intentional attention to our experience from moment to moment. Mindfulness teaches us to become patiently and spaciously aware of what is going on in our mind and body without judgment, reaction, and distraction, thus inviting into the clinical process, the inner strengths and resources that help achieve healing results not otherwise possible. Bringing the power of mindful presence to your clinical practice produces considerable clinical impact in the treatment of anxiety, depression, PTSD, chronic pain, high blood pressure, fibromyalgia, colitis/IBS, and migraines/tension headaches. The emphasis of this course is largely experiential and will offer you the benefit of having a direct experience of the mindfulness experience in a safe and supportive fashion. You will utilize the power of “taking the client there” as an effective technique of introducing the mindful experience in your practice setting. As you will learn, the mindfulness practice has to be experienced rather than talked about. This course will provide you with an excellent understanding of exactly what mindfulness is, why it works, and how to use it. You will also develop the tools that help you introduce mindful experiences in your practice, and how to deal with possible client resistance. Course #60-75 | 2008 | 73 pages | 27 posttest questions
This course examines the biological, social, and psychological aspects of aging, offering a definition of aging that allows for more variability than simply the attainment of a specific age, including the essential element of declining vigor. It describes a developing societal crisis in the making, in which 20% of the U.S. population is over the age of 65 and facing challenges that will demand intelligent responses for years to come. Chapters identify factors that can positively alter and extend the time before the inevitable end of life, with a special focus on the Eriksons’ suggested ways for seniors to remain vitally involved. Of particular interest are the strategies that are offered for assisting aging individuals to use the resources of a lifetime in meaningful ways to enhance their own lives and those of others. These include wellness planning, physical activity, mood and motivation.Closeout Course #30-07 | 2004 | 36 pages | 20 posttest questions
This CE test is based on the book “A Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Workbook” (2010, 224 pages). Stress and pain are nearly unavoidable in our daily lives; they are part of the human condition. This stress can often leave us feeling irritable, tense, overwhelmed, and burned-out. The key to maintaining balance is responding to stress not with frustration and self-criticism, but with mindful, nonjudgmental awareness of our bodies and minds. Impossible? Actually, it’s easier than it seems. In just weeks, you can learn mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), a clinically proven program for alleviating stress, anxiety, panic, depression, chronic pain, and a wide range of medical conditions. Taught in classes and clinics worldwide, this powerful approach shows you how to focus on the present moment in order to permanently change the way you handle stress. As you work through A Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Workbook, you’ll learn how to replace stress-promoting habits with mindful ones-a skill that will last a lifetime.

Professional Development Resources is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists; by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB Provider #1046, ACE Program); by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA Provider #AAUM); by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR Provider #PR001); by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); by the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635), Dietetics & Nutrition (#50-1635), Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Occupational Therapy Practice (#34); by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); by the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and by the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2015 in General

 

Louisiana Occupational Therapists License Renewals and Continuing Education Information

Louisiana Occupational Therapists Continuing Education and License Renewals

Louisiana OT’s CE Requirements

Louisiana-licensed occupational therapists have a yearly license renewal with an expiration on the last day of the birth month.

Fifteen (15) continuing education hours are required to renew a license. There are no limits on home study if AOTA approved.

Click Here to See Continuing Education Courses Online for Occupational Therapists!

Professional Development Resources is an American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

Information gathered from the Louisiana Board of Medical Examiners on August 27, 2015.

Popular Online Courses for Occupational Therapists

Healthy professional and personal relationships rely heavily on effective communication techniques and respectful conversational skills. Clinicians and other professionals who work with children and their families can benefit from adding to their repertoire by learning communication techniques that improve the quality of these relationships. The correct use of language can increase your young clients’ self-esteem, motivate children to learn, engage their willing cooperation, defuse power struggles, and teach conflict resolution skills. With this information, you will also be better prepared to manage difficult conversations. The purpose of this course is to teach clinicians effective and practical communication and conversational skills to use in the classroom and in one-on-one situations with young clients and their families.Course #30-79 | 2015 | 52 pages | 21 posttest questions
In Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) the human-animal bond is utilized to help meet therapeutic goals and reach individuals who are otherwise difficult to engage in verbal therapies. AAT is considered an emerging therapy at this time, and more research is needed to determine the effects and confirm the benefits. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of research and case studies that illustrate the considerable therapeutic potential of using animals in therapy. AAT has been associated with improving outcomes in four areas: autism-spectrum symptoms, medical difficulties, behavioral challenges, and emotional well-being. This course is designed to provide therapists, educators, and caregivers with the information and techniques needed to begin using the human-animal bond successfully to meet individual therapeutic goals. This presentation will focus exclusively on Animal Assisted Therapy and will not include information on other similar or related therapy.Course #21-05 | 2015 | 36 pages | 16 posttest questions
The Occupational Therapist in Long-Term Care Laura More, MSW, LCSW; Edie Deane-Watson, MS, CCC-A, CCM Occupational therapists work in a variety of settings. The most common workplace is schools, followed by private practice and hospitals. A growing number of occupational therapists, however, are working full or part-time in skilled nursing facilities as the population of the United States ages. Every practice setting has unique characteristics that affect clinical practice. Skilled nursing facilities have a multitude of regulations, complicated billing practices, and a culture of care that must be learned and integrated into the clinician’s treatment habits. This can make it difficult for the OT working part-time or PRN in a skilled nursing facility. This introductory course will provide an overview of the important aspects of long-term care that affect treatment, including the structure, organization and reimbursement system of skilled nursing facilities. The average resident and common treatment areas will also be discussed.Course #20-87 | 2014 | 27 pages | 14 posttest questions
Physical inactivity is among the most critical public health concerns in America today. For healthcare professionals, the creation and implementation of sustainable fitness solutions is a relevant cause. This course will help you become familiar with the physical and psychological rewards involved in the activity of running, identify risks and the most common running injuries – along with their symptoms and most probable causes – and describe strategies that can be used in preventing running injuries and developing a healthy individualized running regimen.Course #10-70 | 2014 | 16 pages | 10 posttest questions
The first section of this course traces the history of the diagnostic concept of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), culminating in the revised criteria of the 2013 version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the DSM-5, with specific focus on the shift from five subtypes to a single spectrum diagnosis. It also aims to provide epidemiological prevalence estimates, identify factors that may play a role in causing ASD, and list the components of a core assessment battery. It also includes brief descriptions of some of the major intervention models that have some empirical support. Section two describes common GI problems and feeding difficulties in autism, exploring the empirical data and/or lack thereof regarding any links between GI disorders and autism. Sections on feeding difficulties offer interventions and behavior change techniques. A final section on nutritional considerations discusses evaluation of nutritional status, supplementation, and dietary modifications with an objective look at the science and theory behind a variety of nutrition interventions. Other theoretical interventions are also reviewed.Course #40-38 | 2013 | 50 pages | 30 posttest questions
 
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Posted by on August 27, 2015 in General

 

New CE Course on Bipolar Disorder in Adults

Bipolar Disorder in Adults - New CE Course from PDResources.org!



Bipolar Disorder in Adults


Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out daily tasks. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and this new introductory course can help…

10-92

Bipolar Disorder in Adults is a new 1-hour online CEU course that provides a brief overview of the signs and symptoms, diagnostic considerations, co-morbid conditions, risk factors, and treatment options for bipolar disorder in adults. Course #10-92 | 2012 | 28 pages | 10 posttest questions

CE Credit: 1 Hour
Learning Level: Introductory
Course Price: $12

Click here to enroll…

***

You might also like…

Bipolar Disorder in Children

1 Hour CE | $12

Managing Chronic Pain

5 Hours CE | $60

Anxiety

4 Hours CE | $56

Nutrition in Mental Health

3 Hours CE | $39

Professional Development Resources is approved to offer continuing education by the American Psychological Association (APA); the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC ACEP #5590); the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWBProvider #1046, ACE Program); the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA Provider #3159); the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (#PCE1625); the Florida Boards of Social Work, Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy (#BAP346), Psychology & School Psychology (#50-1635); the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker & MFT Board (#RCST100501); the South Carolina Board of Professional Counselors & MFTs (#193); and the Texas Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists (#114) and State Board of Social Worker Examiners (#5678).


 

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Texas Occupational Therapists Continuing Education and License Renewals

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Texas OT CEU Requirements

Texas licensed occupational therapists have a biennial license renewal with a birth month deadline. Thirty continuing education hours are required to renew a license. There are no limits for online CE courses if AOTA approved, and there must be a post-test and certificate for the course.
Two types of courses are required to fulfill the CE requirement: Type 1 courses are general information (ex: supervision), and Type 2 course must be specific to occupational therapy practice (15 hours must be from type 2).
Texas occupational therapists can earn all 30 hours required for renewal through online courses offered on the Occupational Therapy page at PDResources.org. Click Here to View AOTA-approved online CEUs.

Continuing Education Courses for Texas Occupational Therapists

This is a test only course (book not included). The book can be purchased from Amazon or some other source.This CE test is based on the book “Apps for Autism” (2015, 436 pages), the ultimate app planner guidebook for parents/professionals addressing autism intervention. There are hundreds of apps for autism, and this course will guide you through them so that you can confidently utilize today’s technology to maximize your child or student’s success. Speech-language pathologist Lois Jean Brady wrote this book to educate parents and professionals about the breakthrough method she calls “iTherapy” – which is the use of mobile technology and apps in meeting students’ individual educational goals.For those who are new to the wonderful world of apps, worry not! This award winning reference will review hundreds of excellent apps, accessories and features organized into 39 chapters for parents and professionals alike. There are also helpful sections of how to choose apps, evidence-based practices, choosing an iDevice, internet safety, a helpful toolbox and much, much more.Course #30-82 | 2015 | 21 posttest questions Click Here to Learn More!
Certainly no one would choose a pain-filled body over a healthy, pain-free body. Yet every day, people unwittingly choose actions and attitudes that contribute to pain or lead to other less-than-desirable consequences on their health, relationships or ability to function. These actions and attitudes are what are called self-defeating behaviors (SDBs) and they keep us from living life to the fullest—if we let them. This course is a self-instructional module that “walks” readers through the process of replacing their self-defeating chronic pain issues with healthy, positive, and productive life-style behaviors. It progresses from an analysis of the emotional aspects of living with chronic pain to specific strategies for dealing more productively with it. Through 16 guided exercises, readers will learn how to identify their self-defeating behaviors (SDBs), analyze and understand them, and then replace them with life-giving actions that lead to permanent behavioral change. Click Here to Learn More!
This course, from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), focuses on research findings reported and projects funded in 2011 and the first half of 2012. These highlights, prepared by NIH’s National Institute on Aging (NIA), the lead institute within NIH for Alzheimer’s research, covers work by an active scientific community. This work aims to elucidate the basic mechanisms and risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease, and then apply this knowledge to the development and testing of new interventions to treat or prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The efforts of researchers and clinicians—made possible by the many people who volunteer for clinical studies and trials—may one day lead to a future free of this devastating disorder. This course details some of the recent progress toward that goal. Click Here to Learn More!

Professional Development Resources is an American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) approved provider of continuing education (#3159). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

 
 

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